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extended warrenty on D70?

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Anonymous
November 28, 2004 7:23:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.

The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
warranty for it.

I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
bouncing against other gear while being carried.

More about : extended warrenty d70

Anonymous
November 28, 2004 7:23:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

william kossack wrote:
> My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>
> The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
> warranty for it.

Some will disagree with me on this, but I say no. Especially at the price
they want for some of them. I know Ritz wants about as much as a new D70
body for theirs. It's all a personal decision in how you feel about these
things. Run the numbers and see what it will cost you per month for the
same amount of coverage and put that money in a mason jar. At the end of
the term you will have enough to buy the latest body and sell your used one.
I never get extended warranties on anything, even new cars and trucks. The
other option is to call your insurance agent and see about getting a special
rider on your homeowners/renters insurance to cover your camera equipment
for a much cheaper rate.


Rita
--
http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2003/
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 7:23:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
> once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up to
> abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
> How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
> bouncing against other gear while being carried.

I would expect the mechanical ruggedness to be comparable to other lighter
Nikons such as the N70 and N80, i.e., not built like a tank, but not a
worry.

The main reason you might wish for an extended warranty is electrical
failure, especially pixel-by-pixel deterioration of the sensor. I have no
feel for how likely this is.
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Anonymous
November 28, 2004 7:23:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Good point, Rita.

You also have to remember that in 3 years, a good used D70 or a
comparable-performance new camera will be much cheaper than a D70 today.
You may want to simply set aside money so that in case of a catastrophic
failure, you can replace your D70 with a well-preserved secondhand one just
like it, or with a newer camera with comparable or better performance.
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 9:57:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Interesting. The extension I was quoted from wolf which is ritz was
about $140 for a year.

I'm mainly curious about how the camera holds up. I once had a Minolta
SLR that had what was described to me as a ceramic board in the prism.
It had the problem of being proned to cracking if the top of the camera
was hit (something that can happen when you carry two cameras around).
The electronics of the camera became unreliable. I had it lock up on me
while viewing the 3rd shuttle launch resulting in my getting no
pictures. After that I sold it and purchased my first F3

I don't expect the D70 to be as rugged as an F series Nikon. I'm just
wanting to know how it holds up under normal use.

Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
> william kossack wrote:
>
>>My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>>
>>The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
>>warranty for it.
>
>
> Some will disagree with me on this, but I say no. Especially at the price
> they want for some of them. I know Ritz wants about as much as a new D70
> body for theirs. It's all a personal decision in how you feel about these
> things. Run the numbers and see what it will cost you per month for the
> same amount of coverage and put that money in a mason jar. At the end of
> the term you will have enough to buy the latest body and sell your used one.
> I never get extended warranties on anything, even new cars and trucks. The
> other option is to call your insurance agent and see about getting a special
> rider on your homeowners/renters insurance to cover your camera equipment
> for a much cheaper rate.
>
>
> Rita
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 9:57:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

william kossack wrote:
> Interesting. The extension I was quoted from wolf which is ritz was
> about $140 for a year.

They generally try to scare you into a 5-year warranty and work downward
from there. If they only offered you a 1-year you got off easy. If you are
a nervous type person when it comes to electronics you might want the
comfort of a 1-year warranty, though I feel it a waste since you most likely
won't need it.

> I'm mainly curious about how the camera holds up. I once had a
> Minolta SLR that had what was described to me as a ceramic board in
> the prism. It had the problem of being proned to cracking if the top
> of the camera was hit (something that can happen when you carry two
> cameras around). The electronics of the camera became unreliable. I
> had it lock up on me while viewing the 3rd shuttle launch resulting
> in my getting no pictures. After that I sold it and purchased my
> first F3

The fit and feel of the camera is great. I have no problems or foresee any
issues arising from the polycarbonate body. I have had it on a hiking trip
with me with a 70-200VR lens, which weighs 3#, and I had no worries climbing
and jumping over rocks.

> I don't expect the D70 to be as rugged as an F series Nikon. I'm just
> wanting to know how it holds up under normal use.

I'm sure you'll do fine. I had the same concerns as you when I first got my
D70 and the great people of this group were very helpful with my concerns.
The only other Nikon body I had was an FE that I bought back in the 80's.
The quality is there and will do what you want under normal use provided, of
course, you aren't using it as a bullet proof vest or a sledgehammer. Good
luck and enjoy.


Rita
--
http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2003/
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 11:02:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

for the kids we got $100 digital camera

these have warrenties because I expect them to either be drop kicked
down the stairs or end up in the wash within a few weeks.

Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
> william kossack wrote:
>
>>Interesting. The extension I was quoted from wolf which is ritz was
>>about $140 for a year.
>
>
> They generally try to scare you into a 5-year warranty and work downward
> from there. If they only offered you a 1-year you got off easy. If you are
> a nervous type person when it comes to electronics you might want the
> comfort of a 1-year warranty, though I feel it a waste since you most likely
> won't need it.
>
>
>>I'm mainly curious about how the camera holds up. I once had a
>>Minolta SLR that had what was described to me as a ceramic board in
>>the prism. It had the problem of being proned to cracking if the top
>>of the camera was hit (something that can happen when you carry two
>>cameras around). The electronics of the camera became unreliable. I
>>had it lock up on me while viewing the 3rd shuttle launch resulting
>>in my getting no pictures. After that I sold it and purchased my
>>first F3
>
>
> The fit and feel of the camera is great. I have no problems or foresee any
> issues arising from the polycarbonate body. I have had it on a hiking trip
> with me with a 70-200VR lens, which weighs 3#, and I had no worries climbing
> and jumping over rocks.
>
>
>>I don't expect the D70 to be as rugged as an F series Nikon. I'm just
>>wanting to know how it holds up under normal use.
>
>
> I'm sure you'll do fine. I had the same concerns as you when I first got my
> D70 and the great people of this group were very helpful with my concerns.
> The only other Nikon body I had was an FE that I bought back in the 80's.
> The quality is there and will do what you want under normal use provided, of
> course, you aren't using it as a bullet proof vest or a sledgehammer. Good
> luck and enjoy.
>
>
> Rita
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 11:02:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

william kossack wrote:
> for the kids we got $100 digital camera
>
> these have warrenties because I expect them to either be drop kicked
> down the stairs or end up in the wash within a few weeks.

Yep, an extended warranty for this is a great idea since you know you will
probably use it three or four times in a year. For yourself, though, if you
know your handling capabilities I would be less anxious to buy one.



Rita
--
http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2003/
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:53:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:23:03 GMT, william kossack
<wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:

>My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>
>The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
>warranty for it.
>
>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>bouncing against other gear while being carried.


I think a lot of the choice depends on the price of the warranty.

For instance... generally one doesn't buy an extended warranty on a
new car. Well, I knew that, and on my first car, I said no... until
the dealer dropped the price to where it was too good to be true. Then
I said yes.

And it paid off. Even though I had a good, reliable model (Toyota), it
did develop an engine problem that would have cost me around $900 to
fix if I hadn't had the warranty. (Under $300).

OTOH... the price for an extended warranty on my Subaru is too much
and I won't be buying it.

I have no experience with the D70... but my little Olympus C3030 is 3
years old and still cooking along, never needed any kind of repair.


Cynthia
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 2:28:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

william kossack <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:

>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>bouncing against other gear while being carried.

Would the warranty cover that kind of damage, anyway? Most
warranties don't cover any sort of 'rough usage' and are just
for mfgr defects or parts that fail under normal use. 'Normal
kicking around' would be your interpretation, not theirs!

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 2:28:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 11:28:24 +0200, Ken Tough <ken@objectech.co.uk>
wrote:

>william kossack <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>>bouncing against other gear while being carried.
>
>Would the warranty cover that kind of damage, anyway? Most
>warranties don't cover any sort of 'rough usage' and are just
>for mfgr defects or parts that fail under normal use. 'Normal
>kicking around' would be your interpretation, not theirs!

I don't have a D70; I have a Digital Rebel (300D).
From what I've read here, the D70 is reported to at least feel more
robust than the DR, and my DR has been banged around inside a Lowepro
EX180 bag for some time now, with no ill effects at all.
Anecdotal evidence that these cameras may not be as fragile as is
sometimes suspected.

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:09:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <HXmqd.576885$mD.94359@attbi_s02>, william kossack
<wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:

> My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>
> The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
> warranty for it.
>
> I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
> once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
> to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
> How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
> bouncing against other gear while being carried.

I've used my D70 outdoors every day since July 1, taken more than 7000
shots, carried to every job, restaurant, and vacation including all
over Mexico, and the thing looks brand new -- not even a scratch -- and
works perfecty.

Check your credit card contract. My Mastercard automatically doubles
the warranty on all of my purchases, making extended warranties worth a
lot less.

Also, don't think about the cost of a single extended warranty. If you
refuse extended warranties on all the electronics and appliances you
buy, and then you end up paying for one or two repairs, you'll still be
way, way ahead.

Consumer Reports recently concluded that extended warranties were only
worthwhile on laptops and treadmills:

-----

The odds are heavily stacked against your collecting on an extended
warranty. In fact, the operating profit margins on such warranties are
nearly 70 percent, vs. 10 percent on the products they cover, says
Laura Champine, a consumer-products analyst at Morgan Keegan, a Memphis
investment bank.

Even for products more likely to need repair, such as projection TVs
(14 percent repair rate in their first three years), an extended
warranty is a poor bet. The average cost of a projection-TV warranty
was about the same as the repair cost.

Two exceptions: If you¹re buying an expensive treadmill with a
standard warranty of less than two years on parts and one on labor,
consider an extended warranty for two years. For laptop computers,
consider a one- to three-year extension of the standard one-year
warranty (buy from the maker; that extends tech support). If you travel
with the laptop a lot, consider screen and accidental-damage insurance,
too.

-----

-=-Joe
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:33:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The selling point they told us at the store that if anything happened
to the camera and as long as we could bring part of it in with the
serial number it would be replaced. I'd have to read the fine print but
my wife has that paperwork to be sure.

PS got an extended warrenty on a gitar also that one of them is getting.
I'm sure he will leave it on his bed and then fall on his bed at 3am.
When a 6 foot 5 kid falls onto something it doesn't do any good.

Ken Tough wrote:
> william kossack <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>
>>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>>bouncing against other gear while being carried.
>
>
> Would the warranty cover that kind of damage, anyway? Most
> warranties don't cover any sort of 'rough usage' and are just
> for mfgr defects or parts that fail under normal use. 'Normal
> kicking around' would be your interpretation, not theirs!
>
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:33:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 14:33:45 GMT, william kossack
<wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:

>The selling point they told us at the store that if anything happened
>to the camera and as long as we could bring part of it in with the
>serial number it would be replaced. I'd have to read the fine print but
>my wife has that paperwork to be sure.

I'd definitely read that fine print.
What the salesman said won't be worth spit if it's not spelled out in
the warranty.

>
>PS got an extended warrenty on a gitar also that one of them is getting.
> I'm sure he will leave it on his bed and then fall on his bed at 3am.
> When a 6 foot 5 kid falls onto something it doesn't do any good.
>
>Ken Tough wrote:
>> william kossack <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>>>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>>>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>>>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>>>bouncing against other gear while being carried.
>>
>>
>> Would the warranty cover that kind of damage, anyway? Most
>> warranties don't cover any sort of 'rough usage' and are just
>> for mfgr defects or parts that fail under normal use. 'Normal
>> kicking around' would be your interpretation, not theirs!
>>

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:36:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Normally I would not pay for a warrenty but these kids have a history of
not treating electronics well. One of them goes through a couple
portable CD players in a year. Typical use is to toss it onto the bed
and it falls to the floor or it gets put into a backpack which gets
tossed onto the floor (I think once one of the dogs chewed on it)

Eager wrote:
> In article <HXmqd.576885$mD.94359@attbi_s02>, william kossack
> <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>
>>My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>>
>>The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
>>warranty for it.
>>
>>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>>bouncing against other gear while being carried.
>
>
> I've used my D70 outdoors every day since July 1, taken more than 7000
> shots, carried to every job, restaurant, and vacation including all
> over Mexico, and the thing looks brand new -- not even a scratch -- and
> works perfecty.
>
> Check your credit card contract. My Mastercard automatically doubles
> the warranty on all of my purchases, making extended warranties worth a
> lot less.
>
> Also, don't think about the cost of a single extended warranty. If you
> refuse extended warranties on all the electronics and appliances you
> buy, and then you end up paying for one or two repairs, you'll still be
> way, way ahead.
>
> Consumer Reports recently concluded that extended warranties were only
> worthwhile on laptops and treadmills:
>
> -----
>
> The odds are heavily stacked against your collecting on an extended
> warranty. In fact, the operating profit margins on such warranties are
> nearly 70 percent, vs. 10 percent on the products they cover, says
> Laura Champine, a consumer-products analyst at Morgan Keegan, a Memphis
> investment bank.
>
> Even for products more likely to need repair, such as projection TVs
> (14 percent repair rate in their first three years), an extended
> warranty is a poor bet. The average cost of a projection-TV warranty
> was about the same as the repair cost.
>
> Two exceptions: If you¹re buying an expensive treadmill with a
> standard warranty of less than two years on parts and one on labor,
> consider an extended warranty for two years. For laptop computers,
> consider a one- to three-year extension of the standard one-year
> warranty (buy from the maker; that extends tech support). If you travel
> with the laptop a lot, consider screen and accidental-damage insurance,
> too.
>
> -----
>
> -=-Joe
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:36:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"william kossack" <wskossack@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:2uGqd.484403$D%.141512@attbi_s51...
> Normally I would not pay for a warrenty but these kids have a history of
> not treating electronics well. One of them goes through a couple portable
> CD players in a year. Typical use is to toss it onto the bed and it falls
> to the floor or it gets put into a backpack which gets tossed onto the
> floor (I think once one of the dogs chewed on it)

They need to learn something very important about their relationship with
the physical universe, rather than having Daddy just pay for the damage.

If you buy an extended warranty, don't tell them.
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:36:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Actually, there are 2 different concepts mixed together in a typical
warranty:

(1) Warranty that the equipment was properly assembled and working when it
left the factory. I.e., guarantee that the manufacturer made what he
claimed to make.

(2) Insurance against subsequent damage, wear and tear, or unavoidable but
unpredictable component failure.

It is traditional to offer (1) and about 90 days of (2) (to cover components
that may have had hidden defects at the time of manufacture). As you offer
more and more of (2) it becomes more of an insurance policy and has to be
evaluated by the same criteria as insurance: "would I rather have the risk
of loss or the expense of insurance?"
December 1, 2004 9:58:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

william kossack wrote:
> My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>
> The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
> warranty for it.
>
> I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
> once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
> to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
> How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
> bouncing against other gear while being carried.

As mentioned by another postee, check that the warranty covers
accidental physical damage. I'd be surprised if it does. At least in the
UK I've never come across one that does - mind you I never buy the
extended warranty from a store, they are usually a complete rip off.

I have a D70. It's nothing like as robust as my F5 but it certainly
doesn't feel fragile.

However....I did knock it off my desk onto a wooden floor and it
sustained damage to the bayonet mounting that required sending back to
Nikon for repair costing over 300GBP. I was able to claim this money
back from my Home Insurance Policy (which had no particular provision
for my photographic equipment), again no need for a warranty.

The D70 was attached to a Nikon 70-200VR lens and dropped between three
and four feet onto a hard wooden floor. The lens and body separated with
the lens taking some of the bayonet mounting with it. The lens was fine
and sustained no damage :-) the body, as I mentioned above, did.

Adey
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 1:23:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:23:03 GMT, william kossack
<wskossack@comcast.net> wrote:

>My D70 kit should be in by Wednesday.
>
>The one question I'm not sure about is if I should buy an extended
>warranty for it.
>
>I've shot 35mm for 20 years and I've never dropped a camera (lenses yes
>once or twice). Ofcourse my old F3s are tough cameras made to hold up
>to abuse but the D70? The question is the D70 particularly fragile?
>How does it hold up to normal kicking around inside a camera bag and
>bouncing against other gear while being carried.

We have bought three extended warranties; one on a pickup truck, one
on a digitasl camera, one on our DTIVO unit.
All three have paid for themselves.
Interestingly, these are the *only* items I can think of that woulkd
have paid off that way, had we bought them for everything.
So, in my experience(!) buying one guarantees you'll need it.
:-(

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
!