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Does Phenom ii x 4 955, come with thermal paste on the heatsink?

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May 9, 2010 11:33:30 AM

Heya about to by my new processor and was just wondering I am going to need buy any thermal paste. Does anyone who has bought the above processor know whether or not the heat-sink that comes with the processor has thermal paste already on it?

Thanks x
May 9, 2010 11:37:34 AM

Assuming you bought the retail version, the one that comes with a fan, yes it does.
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May 9, 2010 1:16:21 PM

So when I get one, i'm going to have to remove the stock one (thermal compund)? damn....
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May 9, 2010 1:18:57 PM

Yep it will be pretty straightforward to install. Just follow the instructions that come with your CPU but it's pretty self-explanatory. Make sure you have solid even pressure and you can't go wrong. Good luck!

@ uncfan_2563

You only have to remove the pre-applied thermal compound if you intend on applying your own after market compound. Otherwise the pre-applied stuff will do the job.
May 9, 2010 1:22:23 PM

Yeah i'll be putting OCZ Freeze on so.. that's not cool.
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May 9, 2010 1:25:25 PM

The pre-applied compound doesn't a decent enough job of cooling so I wouldn't bother if it were me but if you do want to apply your own compound then you will have to remove the pre-applied stuff using isopropyl alochol and cotton wool buds, then apply your new compound.
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May 9, 2010 1:26:30 PM

Sorry that should have read "does a decent enough job..." :sarcastic: 
May 9, 2010 1:26:48 PM

moody89 said:
The pre-applied compound doesn't a decent enough job of cooling so I wouldn't bother if it were me but if you do want to apply your own compound then you will have to remove the pre-applied stuff using isopropyl alochol and cotton wool buds, then apply your new compound.

Oh Joy. This is why I wish they'd stop simplifying things for non-tech savvy people. It didn't need to be there in the first place!
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May 9, 2010 1:52:18 PM

Your dreading a one minute job ? They include the paste because 97% of retail packages (come with heat sink,fan) install them as is. Buy a oem cpu , comes without that dreaded paste on the heat sink or the hs, :) .
May 9, 2010 2:05:42 PM

^ Notty, Its the principle of the thing.

It seems almost disrespuctfull, they should just include a tiny tube in the package and let people make the choice themselves!
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May 9, 2010 3:39:06 PM

The tim is usually on the hsf, not the cpu anyways. This is done to take another variable out of the equation. Should I say IDIOT proof ? There are people, yes they admitted it here. Who have taken a tube of tim, and thought they should put the whole container on the cpu. What do you think happened ?
You don't have to be dumb to make a mistake, you may have just never built or worked with electronics.
Principle and disrespectful ? lol Do you know how many people don't read the m/b manual, when installing their components ? This leads to common things like ,no tim, memory module installation mistakes, cpu power not installed.
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May 9, 2010 5:33:16 PM

hang on, hang on. surely there's a simpler point here:

OP, why do you want to apply OCZ Freeze to a stock cooler? Even the best TIM isn't going to make a stock cooler do a better job.

If you want lower temps then get a better cooler and Freeze to your heart's content.
May 9, 2010 5:35:27 PM

LePhuronn said:
Even the best TIM isn't going to make a stock cooler do a better job.



It would help by a few C.

And there are giving away free TIM on tom's so why not?
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May 9, 2010 5:47:50 PM

adam_x_brookes said:
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CP...

Okie dokie thanks, so it will be easy to install? It's my first build=)


Two pieces of advice I would pass on for a first build.

1) Make sure you have your motherboard standoffs positioned correctly. I am amazed how often this mistake is made.

2) Take static electricity precautions seriously.

3) Quality Power Supply.

Getting these 3 things right will solve a lot of problems that might arise down the line.
May 9, 2010 6:41:01 PM

FALC0N said:
Two pieces of advice I would pass on for a first build.

1) Make sure you have your motherboard standoffs positioned correctly. I am amazed how often this mistake is made.

2) Take static electricity precautions seriously.

3) Quality Power Supply.

Getting these 3 things right will solve a lot of problems that might arise down the line.


Isn't grounding things really expensive lol, I've got no money because of this build quite literally spending every penny I have.
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May 9, 2010 7:53:30 PM

Grounding is easy - grab an anti-static strap (cheap enough) clip it to the case and wear it at all times during the build. You can also use a length of fuse wire wrapped around your wrist and hook that into a hole on the case too.

Now, if you're assembling components outside of the case, plug the PSU into the wall but keep the power off and clip the anti-static strap to the fan grille - you're still grounded. When you're putting everything into the case, install the PSU first keep it plugged in and then clip the strap to the metal in the case.
May 9, 2010 9:00:33 PM

LePhuronn said:
Grounding is easy - grab an anti-static strap (cheap enough) clip it to the case and wear it at all times during the build. You can also use a length of fuse wire wrapped around your wrist and hook that into a hole on the case too.

Now, if you're assembling components outside of the case, plug the PSU into the wall but keep the power off and clip the anti-static strap to the fan grille - you're still grounded. When you're putting everything into the case, install the PSU first keep it plugged in and then clip the strap to the metal in the case.


ok thanks for the advice man I will do =D
May 9, 2010 9:19:46 PM

LePhuronn said:
hang on, hang on. surely there's a simpler point here:

OP, why do you want to apply OCZ Freeze to a stock cooler? Even the best TIM isn't going to make a stock cooler do a better job.

If you want lower temps then get a better cooler and Freeze to your heart's content.

I'm not the OP but i'm assuming you're talking to me.

I never said I was using the stock cooler ;) 
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May 9, 2010 9:31:25 PM

uncfan_2563 said:
I'm not the OP but i'm assuming you're talking to me.

I never said I was using the stock cooler ;) 


I've been awake far too long! Apologies lol I'd recommend ArctiClean for cleaning up TIM works a treat.
May 9, 2010 10:06:20 PM

LePhuronn said:
I've been awake far too long! Apologies lol I'd recommend ArctiClean for cleaning up TIM works a treat.

is it much better than just using alcohol?
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May 9, 2010 10:18:13 PM

people say just alcohol is fine, personally I like this stuff because of the surface cleanser - once in a while i've used just alcohol and no matter how much cleaning i've done it seems there's still a residue or film of something left.

My ArctiClean wasn't that expensive and it's not like you use a lot of it so it'll last a while.
May 10, 2010 8:41:01 AM

LePhuronn said:
Grounding is easy - grab an anti-static strap (cheap enough) clip it to the case and wear it at all times during the build. You can also use a length of fuse wire wrapped around your wrist and hook that into a hole on the case too.

Now, if you're assembling components outside of the case, plug the PSU into the wall but keep the power off and clip the anti-static strap to the fan grille - you're still grounded. When you're putting everything into the case, install the PSU first keep it plugged in and then clip the strap to the metal in the case.


Reasonably good advice, BUT I don't like the idea of fuse wire... A well made anti static wrist strap has a built-in pico fuse that will save your a$$ in the case of a dead short to ground. Also, that same technique will work just the same whether building inside the case or outside the case. No matter which method, start with the PSU, ground yourself, then start handling components. (I prefer to use the MB's anti static bag on top of the MB's foam cushion when starting a build outside of the case, but...)

HSF cleaner compound... Personal preferences, in order:
1) Lacquer thinner, 90% or higher.
2) MEK, fresh bottle or tin.
3) isopropyl alcohol 70% or higher.
4) partner's nail polish remover.

NOTHING will remove the HSF stains left by AS5, short of lapping (again). Iso needs some time to dry, and your partner's nail polish remover will leave some oils that MAY interfere with heat transfer in extreme circumstances....
!