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Very Old System = Slow Internet??

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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April 14, 2010 3:53:10 AM

The computer in my house that is connected to the router is about 9-1/2 years old, and even then it wasn't exactly top-shelf.

Will that cause the internet connection to be slower than it would be if the pc was brand new? I really couldn't care less about the old computer (which is why I have't updated it/replaced it), but I DO care about the connection it gets, because it's the source of the wi-fi being spread throughout the whole house, making my computer and everyone else's laptops and wireless ______'s slow.

I have at&t's elite plan, which boasts 3-6mbps, yet I get around 100-200 kbps. I've tried just about every little trick (port forwarding, new router, checking cables/interference, etc.), and I'm running out of ideas. I know 6mbps isn't realistic, but I'd like to get at least some bang for my buck.

Web browsing seems to be fine/fast, but download speed is just ridiculously slow.

Basically, Will a better computer connected to the router make our internet connection faster? For instance, the computer listed in my sig (my personal comp)?
If you can help, thanks alot guys
-Max

P.S. My PC's Specs are in the sig, didn't list the old PC's specs b/c they arent really necessary-just know it's really a terrible piece of machinery.

More about : system slow internet

April 15, 2010 1:54:27 AM

Is this speed that which is reported by something like DSL speedtest, or a download manager? Remember that the download managers speed should be approx. 1/8 of the 'actual' speed because most of them report in kiloBYTES rather than kiloBITS. I know that this doesn't account for all of your speed, but it might be some of it. (P.S. I'm guessing that you know this. Not trying to insult your inteligence, just covering all bases)
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April 15, 2010 6:07:03 AM

[#0005ff]Agreed although I'm not sure it isn't the other way around - they report in Bits of which there are eight to the Byte but Maclark's router is actually the "computer" in charge of the connection and anything else connected to it wouldn't improve the speed. It's also worth pointing out that ISPs lie through their teeth about the speed they offer and yes, they can sue me for that one. They then hide behind the "up to" in the small print when challenged as to why they aren't providing the full 8Mb or whatever.
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April 15, 2010 11:29:54 AM

Just thinking - have you tried connecting a new computer directly to the modem and doing a speed test to see what your ISP is actually giving you?
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April 16, 2010 3:11:45 AM

I'm beginning to see that Saga Lout is right. It's not a problem with anything connected to my router.

I can unplug my old computer and no changes are seen in the speed. Thanks for helping me see that Saga. This question's solved, Old Computer can't = Slow Internet in this case.

Btw: I got 1.23 Mb/s on speedtest.net. Is that normal then for At&t Elite? Is it just a ridiculously bad ISP? My friend got 33Mb/s on speed test on road runner. Normal difference?
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April 16, 2010 3:12:10 AM

Best answer selected by maclark13588.
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April 16, 2010 6:58:30 AM

maclark13588 said:
I'm beginning to see that Saga Lout is right. It's not a problem with anything connected to my router.

I can unplug my old computer and no changes are seen in the speed. Thanks for helping me see that Saga. This question's solved, Old Computer can't = Slow Internet in this case.

Btw: I got 1.23 Mb/s on speedtest.net. Is that normal then for At&t Elite? Is it just a ridiculously bad ISP? My friend got 33Mb/s on speed test on road runner. Normal difference?



[#0005ff]
Thanks for the Best Answer click - sadly I can't help on the A T & T speed because it's a US ISP and I'm in England where we have our own problems. Speed can even vary between telephone exchanges though and it also depends how far you are (in cable length terms) from that exchange.

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