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Hp class action lawsuit

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October 24, 2010 10:07:14 PM

Is there a class action suite against HP for defective motherboards?
My desktop is just passed one year old and the motherboard went on it, HP says they can fix it for a fee of $220.
Somehow I feel that the system should last longer than one year, so someone had mentioned that there may be a lawsuite in progress, if so, how do I join?

Thanks,
John

More about : class action lawsuit

a b V Motherboard
October 24, 2010 10:52:46 PM

Things come things go, I'm sure HP isn't doing it intentionally. Just replace the board for $50 and you'll be on your way.
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October 25, 2010 4:24:37 AM

I've always built my own computers but I am amazed that you don't have a warranty that is over one year. As for a class action lawsuit I don't believe any are going on at this time so its likely your experience isn't very common.

I do advise however you do not pay that $220 as that is highly overpriced.
Replacing the motherboard yourself or if you feel incapable perhaps you have
a friend or family member who can do it for you. If you can tell us your computer
model we can certainly help you find a new motherboard that will meet your requirements.
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a b V Motherboard
October 25, 2010 5:34:17 AM

HP is one of the old players in computer business. I don't think a lawsuit is currently in progress. The fanatics numbers are a lot greater than the disappointed ones.

I agree with the others, get a new motherboard and move on. I wouldn't waste time for such simple issue.
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December 30, 2010 4:16:21 PM

I have a HP mod# P6116FPC and started having problems just before the warranty was up. When I contacted HP they wanted $150 to talk to them and said my warranty was up 2 days before. Now my computer does not work at all and I was told by an ex HP emp. that it is a bad motherboard. Would be interested in class action against HP
Thanks Glenn A.
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a b V Motherboard
December 30, 2010 5:34:17 PM

If your computer is out of warranty and broke...what do you want?...if you want more protection then buy a warranty. Why is it HP's fault that your HP broke, it might even be your fault lol. And nothing is perfect, *** happens, replace the parts you need and it will be fine.
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December 30, 2010 6:51:59 PM

If you were out of warranty and the machine broke HP has no further legal obligation to fix the computer for free. You agreed to the terms of the warranty when you purchased the computer and nowhere in there did it state that you have rights to service after the warranty has expired. HP has held up their end of the deal. Get over it.

..everyone wants to sue anymore...

Things break, the end.
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March 11, 2011 1:01:00 PM

Actually for class action suits it doesn't matter the warranty period. Its based on the useful life of the product. Most laptop are expected to last 3-5 years. if HP know that their system are failing before that time because of a defect in design or part then they are on the hook for it. HP actually has several class actions pending for just that reason.

The Xbox 360 ring of death is a perfect example. A design flaw meant a large number of system would die within the usefully life of the system but after the warranty period. MS jumped on it and was willing to fix them, before the class actions was ratified.
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March 18, 2011 2:41:27 AM

Psychoteddy said:
If you were out of warranty and the machine broke HP has no further legal obligation to fix the computer for free. You agreed to the terms of the warranty when you purchased the computer and nowhere in there did it state that you have rights to service after the warranty has expired. HP has held up their end of the deal. Get over it.

..everyone wants to sue anymore...

Things break, the end.


If the manufacturer is aware that there is a problem they are obligated to fix it period.
That is the problem with manufascturere they over charge you for their product but don't stan behind what they make.
The problem with some consumers is they are too stupoid to stand up and complain when the product they bought is defective and are affraid to confront the manufascturer or tell others not to buy from that manufacturer.

The only way to solve this problem is to sue and hit the company in their wallet, asw that is all they understand.
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May 15, 2011 10:11:53 AM

I would posit that anybody who gets on these forums and states "things break, get over it", "hp held up their end of the warranty", etc... is probably a plant from the company itself.
I have a HP laptop that just fried its video card/motherboard at 100 days after purchase date. The warranty since it was remanufactured was 90 days. You honestly think a company can make (and recertify) a product that only lasts 10 days past its warranty and they are off the hook completely? The company will pay for this - if not for my new motherboard then for a huge loss in reputation and future sales... they are most definitely on the hook for this.
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July 13, 2011 12:56:19 AM

blackhawk1928 said:
If your computer is out of warranty and broke...what do you want?...if you want more protection then buy a warranty. Why is it HP's fault that your HP broke, it might even be your fault lol. And nothing is perfect, *** happens, replace the parts you need and it will be fine.



Please don't think that just because you have a warranty with HP that you are going to get satisfaction in a service of the computer. They are useless. Read on if you want to know why.



05-19-2011 11:09 PM

I bought a Compaq presario V3700 model. Bought also the 3 year extended warranty. Over the first year and a half it developed screen problems that I could live with but then it got worse. Eventually had my computer in to be repaired once. They replaced the mother board and the screeen. Twice and they replaced the screen again. And lastly for the third time and final as the warranty has now expired again, to have the screeen yet again replaced. Either the parts are too cheaply manufactured or the service department is incompetant. Cost me so much waisted time and money posting the computer that it would have been better to bin the computer on the first fail. I won't buy another HP product no matter what they offer. Customer service and satisfaction is just not part of what they offer. They offer cheaper inferior products.

All this based on my experience and of my own opinion of course.

Oh, and lastly to finish, now Taiwan post won't accept postage of my computer any longer and so I will return there in 6 months time to pick up my garbage.
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a b V Motherboard
July 13, 2011 3:38:31 AM

Most retail computers are sold with a 1 year warranty, where you have an option to buy an extended warranty. Retail computers are typically built to survive the typical "usable life" of 3-5 years. The manufacturers have no way of knowing whether or not the consumer is going to buy the extended warranty, so trying to manipulate failure rates is a pointless gamble to them.

This thread reminds me of the funniest day I ever had at work. A guy comes in complaining about a "noise" in his engine compartment. The car is just out of warranty. He pays to have the "noise" diagnosed. After being told his car needed an engine, he immediately asked for the phone number for Ford Motor Company's legal department. When asked why he needed the number, he stated that he intended to sue Ford Motor Company for intentionally building his car with a faulty engine. Several days and a few phone calls later, he returns. The Ford Motor Company engineering rep meets him at the shop to discuss his "problem". The man got a new engine at no cost, as per Ford Motor Company's own policies that had been in place for nearly 2 decades, but at the same time was shown that a little intelligence and patience go a lot further that attempting to file BS lawsuits.

Now, I said all that to say this. Electronics, as well as all mass produced goods, will in fact fail at some point. Screaming lawsuit every time a product fails serves no purpose other than to make you look ignorant/greedy. Just because YOU experience a failure shortly after your product warranty expires, does not mean it's a common problem or a manufacturer defect of any sort exists. Sometimes, *** just happens. Over the weekend, my house A/C failed. Should I be able to sue the manufacturer of my A/C unit because of a failure? Unless you can prove, beyond any reasonable doubt that the failure occurred due to manufacturing defect of some sort, as well as the manufacturer having prior knowledge of failures, you're wasting your time even thinking about a lawsuit. Hell, I'd like to sue Asus over the 6 previous motherboards I bought from them failing....what's the odds that 4, K7V133 boards would fail within a 60day period? How about a K7M that Asus knew had a faulty Southbridge? Or K8V-X with it's known faulty IDE controller chip?

rako71 said:
Actually for class action suits it doesn't matter the warranty period. Its based on the useful life of the product. Most laptop are expected to last 3-5 years. if HP know that their system are failing before that time because of a defect in design or part then they are on the hook for it. HP actually has several class actions pending for just that reason.

The Xbox 360 ring of death is a perfect example. A design flaw meant a large number of system would die within the usefully life of the system but after the warranty period. MS jumped on it and was willing to fix them, before the class actions was ratified.

You also have to show that a significant number of consumers are effected, as well as showing relation of the instances. Several years ago, Dell was the subject of a class-action suit in which Dell Dimension 4600 power supplies were failing at 13-15months for consumers with 1yr warranty and within 1-3 months of warranty end for consumers who bought the extended warranties. I tried to find it...but apparently Dell spends more time dealing with class-action suits over their sub-par quality garbage that there's too many results on Google. But, basically, if the problem is known to exist and knowledge of such can be proven, you can get around the other requirements for class-action status in some courts, but you'll still have to show a negative impact to consumers.

Rook_B said:
Yes there is. This should be all the information you need.

www.hpelitedesktopsettlement.com


His particular model doesn't fall under that class-action settlement as it pertains to 8 specific "Pavilion Elite" models, which are listed on the site.
Quote:
Welcome to the Settlement Website for Kent v. Hewlett Packard Company, Case No. C 09-05341 JF. This website provides information about the class action settlement involving certain HP Pavilion Elite desktop computers. On April 15, 2011, the Court gave preliminary approval to the settlement and certified a settlement class of individual and entity end-users who purchased, leased, received as a gift or otherwise acquired in the United States an HP Pavilion Elite desktop computer model e9150t, e9180f, e9180t, m9600t, m9650f, e9280f, e9280t or e9290f.


HP model # P6116FPC is not listed.

climb1028 said:
I would posit that anybody who gets on these forums and states "things break, get over it", "hp held up their end of the warranty", etc... is probably a plant from the company itself.

That post is just pure ignorance....I've never had the first problem with an HP product. Legally, unless YOU can prove wrong-doing on HP's part, they have held up their end of the warranty contract. In the case of masegl53, he started experiencing problems prior to his warranty expiration, yet apparently failed to contact HP prior to the expiration. That isn't HP's faulty....that was masegl53's own fault.
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July 13, 2011 5:29:30 AM

In short you are on your own with a HP product. I've never had a computer fail so often and had it in for repairs so many times for the same problem. I've seen the same screen problem on other HP Compaqs as well. I believe people just give in and wear it most times but most definitely their Compaq series are junk.
And as for after sales service, for me it was basically non existent and incompetent.
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a b V Motherboard
July 13, 2011 6:04:13 PM

Your best bet is to contact a manager in HP offices if you feel you deserves better. I work in the computer industry, stuff fails. I actually work in the Enterprise Information Systems field thus, I work with servers daily. I've had several fail and always receive great customer service, even for out of warranty items. Mainly because I spend tens thousands of dollars on HP servers thus, they want to keep me going back. You are trying to leap forward from a consumer aspect and the business fo yours they will lose is irrelevant to them. It's basic economics. A single person in the market can't affect the price of major goods. This is known as a "Competitive Market" [-Mankiw. Principles of Macroeconomics. 5th Edition]

You could just buy a different manufacturer and it still won't matter to HP. They simply won't care. That's current business. If they lose my service, yes, they would notice but it still wouldn't matter financially to them. Your $700 computer isn't even a drop in the bucket.

Heck, to determine the failure rate and avoid the problems you're in, HP statistically calculates their machines failure rates and see when the machine is likely to fail. They figure that on a standard, 9X% of machines will perform without problems and often, they are quite correct. There all always the outliers but, the place their results as a standard distribution and know that they will, 97% of the time, not have issues. They calculate their confidence interval and their probability intervals and KNOW they will line up and the average of their standard deviations will equivocate to roughly the same average. (Probably >3 years). But, in your instance, you received an outlier that failed. You have one of the 3% of units that is expected to fail. Economics and Statistics would tell you everything you need to know to realize you can't have an intelligent lawsuit regarding this. So it failed just after the warranty period, it could have failed within the warranty period or after 10 years, but HP doesn't make products that fail just out of warranty, they make products that won't fail 9X% of the time within their designated time frame, which is likely 5 years.
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