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Critical box check in CCC for some LCD's + 5870 card running high res.

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 21, 2010 6:57:44 AM

ATI latest Catalyst Control Center 10.2 shows my 60hz Dell 2407WFP monitor at 75Hz and I was getting green pixels increasingly over time, then red text smearing on my 2 day old ATI Radeon 5870. I check a strange box deep inside the menus and it fixed the issue instantly.

A brand new 5870 card right out of the box running the latest version of ATI's Catalyst Control Center and using a 60 Hz high resolution display (1920 by 1080 or 1920 by 1200- ATI does not specify) can have graphics issues with the card depending on the LCD monitor unless a crtain box is checked.

Here is how I fixed the increasing worse over time pixel popups on even my desktop background.

ATI Catalyst Control Center-Desktop and Displays- right click on little down arrow in the upper right on bottom left display (rotten location!) and select configure- Digital Panel (DVI) (5) screen-Attributes tab-DVI settings-check the "Reduce DVI frequency on high resolution displays". Press the "Apply" button on the bottom. Now check to see if card is working correctly.


If you have a monitor capable of running "high resolution" and are using your windows recommended maximum resolution (in my case 1920 by 1200), you may have to check the "reduce DVI frequency for high resolution monitors". In my case, by not checking the box, I got green pixels. This box is NEVER automatically checked and it is your responsibility to do so. AMD moderator says that the unchecked box would work fine in my case only if I reduce my maximum resolution from say 1920 by 1200 to 1280 by 1024.



http://forums.amd.com/game/messageview.cfm?catid=260&th...
February 21, 2010 7:45:58 AM

/facepalm.

I don't even know where to begin with this one.
February 21, 2010 9:14:36 AM

welshmousepk said:
/facepalm.

I don't even know where to begin with this one.


Heh, had to look it up. Is this a stupid post? Not sure why tho. Does everyone know about this "reduce DVI" box except me? Am I wrong in thinking that my hundreds of green pixels everywhere would get worse? Is ATI allowed to default to a non working configuration because I am too stupid to figure it out? What?
February 21, 2010 11:32:42 AM

1900x1080 and 1900x1280 are news to me, when did monitors get these native resolutions ? lol
February 21, 2010 2:50:25 PM

lucuis said:
1900x1080 and 1900x1280 are news to me, when did monitors get these native resolutions ? lol


Heh, up all night. Look at the timestamp. I am lucky to get my NAME right at that point. Meantime, I fixed the errors (I think!)
February 21, 2010 3:00:53 PM

I've never had this problem, im using a 5850 and a LCD display at 1920 x 1080.

I've also never heard of 1900 x 1080 or 1900 x 1280.
February 21, 2010 11:00:17 PM

Johnpombrio said:
Heh, had to look it up. Is this a stupid post? Not sure why tho. Does everyone know about this "reduce DVI" box except me? Am I wrong in thinking that my hundreds of green pixels everywhere would get worse? Is ATI allowed to default to a non working configuration because I am too stupid to figure it out? What?


stupid isn't the word id use.

the fact is, you are in a minority who experiences an issue. ATI have a very simple fix, included in the drivers that solves said issue.
yet you seem to think thats not good enough? that the easy fix to an uncommon problem is enough to rant about? and that they should automatically reduce the output frequency of everyone else's card just so you dont have to check a tickbox?

any idea how many complaints THAT would cause?

i don't mean to be unnecessarily hostile, but like i said. i just don't know where to begin on this.

February 22, 2010 3:36:51 AM

Agree, way overkill on the issue. I went back and toned my post WAY DOWN and stuck to facts. After all, my card is now working fine. At least by yelling and stamping my feet a lot, I got an answer back from ATI/AMD (along with a threatened ban and a locked topic)

Your monitor obviously cannot handle a high pixel clock which is why you get the error. The feature reduces the pixel clock to a lower one.

Now I have to figure out what a pixel clock is and why my mainstream Dell 2407WFP monitor cannot handle the "high" pixel clock speed that ATI has defaulted the Radeon 5870 to by their software.

So a box marked "Reduce DVI Frequency on high-resolution monitors" is actually used to reduce the pixel clock speed. Huh, who would have known?
February 22, 2010 5:03:43 AM

they are one and the same, frequency means the refresh rate of the monitor.
pixel clock is a fancy word for the actual frequency that the images is output by the card. (both being, essentially, framerate)

hence why having this ticked by default is a bad idea. it would essentially be lowering the frequency for everyone, meaning lower framerates. not a good solution.
February 22, 2010 5:43:35 AM

I think I have if figured it out. The DVI EDID is not being read correctly given by my 4.5 year old monitor to the ATI software so It is setting the wrong resolution. 1920 by 1200 at 60Hz only has ONE correct pixel clock speed. The card is pumping out too many megapixels. the checked box forces the software to use the correct default megapixel speed for a 1920 by 1200 60Hz display. Probably be a software fix soon. I am done!


All right, making progress! Everest shows my Dell 2407WFP monitor as supporting a 760MHz Maximum Pixel Clock. Now I am going to try to find out what the possible pixel clocks on the Radeon 5870 are...

Huh, this makes no sense. on the DVI-D wikopedia page, it clearly states:

The DVI specification mandates a fixed single link maximum pixel clock frequency of 165 MHz.

Why should my monitor have trouble with that? Onward and Upward!

K, this is interesting. Lets go look at number of megapixels:

Another quote from DVI-D Wikopedia:

With a single DVI link, the largest resolution possible at 60 Hz is 2.75 megapixels (including blanking interval). For practical purposes, this allows a maximum screen resolution at 60 Hz of 1915 x 1436 pixels (standard 4:3 ratio), 1854 x 1483 pixels (5:4 ratio) or 2098 x 1311 (widescreen 16:10 ratio).

For my monitor:

WUXGA (1920 by 1200) resolution is equivalent to 2.3 megapixels.

Bottom line, it looks like my 5870 cannot tell what the resolution of my monitor is and is pumping too high a resolution. I need to check the box to get the card to sync up properly to my real resolution.

Anyone agree?
February 22, 2010 11:59:04 AM

If you had the cash for a 5870...maybe pick up a new lcd ?
!