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Help for noob =P i5 3570K Z77 Extreme4

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December 30, 2012 8:13:12 PM

So, as the title suggests, I'm a noob and I need help overclocking haha. I really don't know much about what to do, while I do know my way around the BIOS for the most part. My goal is 4.0Ghz, but I'm going to start small and work my way up. Also, I have 1866 RAM that I want to OC to at least 2,000. And a GTX 660 that I may OC. I'll ask about those in their respective categories, but it's safe to, lightly, overclock all 3 at once right?

Parts list:
-ASRock Z77 Extreme4
-i5 3570K
-G.Skills Sniper Series DDR3-1866 RAM
-EVGA GTX 660 SuperClocked
-Thermaltake Frio Advanced CPU Cooler (I caught a deal on it, I know that normally it isn't a good deal)
-SeaSonic X750 Gold PSU
-Rosewill Thor V2 Case
-NZXT Sentry 2 (Fan controller and Temp. reader, so I don't have to mess with software =P)

I feel like I'm forgetting something (always feel like that) so if I did, just let me know.

Thanks in advance =)
a b à CPUs
December 30, 2012 8:30:15 PM

There are tons of guiedes around the web and alos here at Toms.

4.0Ghz is pretty much a kids play for most I5, and even with stock cooler most people can get 4.0ghz without much more than just bump the multiplier and have a bunch of fans near the socket.

Also, 4.0ghz can be reached by Software, thought its not recomended for stability you can play with ASRock eXtreme Tunner (should come in yours MOBO's driver CD) bumping the Multiplier to 40. For starting its pretty much the best think you can do without messing with BIOS or other stuff.


For going more deeper I recomend you read very well and understad this guiede

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274821-29-sandy-bridg...

For GPU overclocking, it will be done with software, your card should come with a CD with the EVGA Precision tool, which is great for monitoring and overclocking you GPU.
Also with MSI afterburner you can tweak clocks, just go little by little until there are artifacts or the driver stop responding in gameplay... Just dont get too greedy or bump voltages like crazy it WILL KILL you GPU... its kinda risky, thats why you should read guiedes and undertand what limits you can spect for your parts...

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December 30, 2012 8:50:13 PM

horaciopz said:
There are tons of guiedes around the web and alos here at Toms.

4.0Ghz is pretty much a kids play for most I5, and even with stock cooler most people can get 4.0ghz without much more than just bump the multiplier and have a bunch of fans near the socket.

Also, 4.0ghz can be reached by Software, thought its not recomended for stability you can play with ASRock eXtreme Tunner (should come in yours MOBO's driver CD) bumping the Multiplier to 40. For starting its pretty much the best think you can do without messing with BIOS or other stuff.


For going more deeper I recomend you read very well and understad this guiede

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274821-29-sandy-bridg...

For GPU overclocking, it will be done with software, your card should come with a CD with the EVGA Precision tool, which is great for monitoring and overclocking you GPU.
Also with MSI afterburner you can tweak clocks, just go little by little until there are artifacts or the driver stop responding in gameplay... Just dont get too greedy or bump voltages like crazy it WILL KILL you GPU... its kinda risky, thats why you should read guiedes and undertand what limits you can spect for your parts...



Holy crap, thanks. So I can bump the CPU to 4.0 in the eXtreme Tuner? (I use it to control my CPU fans, so I already have it). Which program should I use to put load on the CPU? I just read something about two of them, but I forgot the names. Which do you think is best? Also, do you think that I could get to 4.5? Since 4 isn't hard, I'll go for that. Definitely reading that guide though.
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a b à CPUs
December 30, 2012 9:20:10 PM

Intel Burn test its pretty much the easier and more demanding stability test out there, sure Prime95 and other will make your processor struggles but i prefer Intel Burn Test for its non brainer use.

Remember, you can damage your components and/or completly kill them. So play carefully, Overclocking with software wont give much stability, thats why I feel that 4.0ghz will be the top of it. Read the guide if you want to go farther, just be careful.
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December 30, 2012 10:37:15 PM

horaciopz said:
Intel Burn test its pretty much the easier and more demanding stability test out there, sure Prime95 and other will make your processor struggles but i prefer Intel Burn Test for its non brainer use.

Remember, you can damage your components and/or completly kill them. So play carefully, Overclocking with software wont give much stability, thats why I feel that 4.0ghz will be the top of it. Read the guide if you want to go farther, just be careful.


So should I do 4.0 with software or through the BIOS? And will I not have to apply any more voltage? Also, if I OC my ram to 2133 I should set it to 1.65V right?
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a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 1:22:11 PM

I really depends on your RAM, not all sticks OC the same, nor all processor OC the same, some I5 need a little bump of voltage just to get 4.0, some others can reach 4.5ghz with the stock voltage, you will never know if you dont try. The ideal set up is just to get 4.0ghz with the software then try stability with Intel Burn Test.

After that, you can get into the BIOS and do what the Guide told you to do, disabling all those saving energy features and disabling turbo core, then set up multiplier to the one you wan reach and the memos clock where you want them to be.

Also, OC will increment heat that the processor will produce, so keep an eye over them, for most sandy/Ivy Bridge intel chips 70ish is good, under 70 is ideal and over 80 is kinda risky...

Ando, No... to OC you ram is not mandatory to put 1.65v, most of the times 1.5 is enough, even some modules run at 1866 with just 1.3. So whats why you should try overclocking with everything at stock.
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December 31, 2012 9:31:35 PM

horaciopz said:
I really depends on your RAM, not all sticks OC the same, nor all processor OC the same, some I5 need a little bump of voltage just to get 4.0, some others can reach 4.5ghz with the stock voltage, you will never know if you dont try. The ideal set up is just to get 4.0ghz with the software then try stability with Intel Burn Test.

After that, you can get into the BIOS and do what the Guide told you to do, disabling all those saving energy features and disabling turbo core, then set up multiplier to the one you wan reach and the memos clock where you want them to be.

Also, OC will increment heat that the processor will produce, so keep an eye over them, for most sandy/Ivy Bridge intel chips 70ish is good, under 70 is ideal and over 80 is kinda risky...

Ando, No... to OC you ram is not mandatory to put 1.65v, most of the times 1.5 is enough, even some modules run at 1866 with just 1.3. So whats why you should try overclocking with everything at stock.


I was bumping my CPU voltage up yesterday, which explains why it ran so hot. I can get to 3.9 via the extreme tuner with stock voltage, but once I hit 4 it ran for a few then shut off. I stay around 70ish though, with a max of 76. I'm going to take my cooler off tomorrow and remount, make sure it's on their right.

This is somewhat unrelated, but it's also kinda related.
I have it set to 3.4 most of the time (stock) and I never noticed all 4 of the cores until I downloaded HWMonitor, but when the CPU is under very little load the core clocks switches between 1.6 and 3.4 (1.6 was the speed by default or whatever). Like one will be 1.6 while the others are 3.4. Is that normal?
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a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 11:58:13 PM

Yeah, thats normal. Thats the energy saving features on, which downlocks the processor and down volt it when its idle, like when you are reading news online, the processor has nothing to do, so it instead of running at its stocks 3.4ghz it get down to 1.6ghz to save energy which is good for most users, but for overclocking its bad, cuz it ll make the processor unstable.

For overclocking you need to disable those features, so the processor will run (always) to the speed you want it, which will make it consume more power, and also run kinda hotter compared to the processor runing with all those features enable.

If your cumputer shut down when it reaches 3.9ghz, forget about overclocking by software, just get into bios, disable all saving features (but no thermal throttle) and put the multiplier at 40 then leave everything at stock.


Also, remember not to tight too much the cooler on your MOBO, the MOBO pins that contact the processor may blend, causing the death of the mobo, at the best of case, it also may fry your processor, making a double death.

Just tight carefully, to secure it is on its place, but not too much, those pins are quite delicate.
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January 1, 2013 2:18:51 AM

horaciopz said:
Yeah, thats normal. Thats the energy saving features on, which downlocks the processor and down volt it when its idle, like when you are reading news online, the processor has nothing to do, so it instead of running at its stocks 3.4ghz it get down to 1.6ghz to save energy which is good for most users, but for overclocking its bad, cuz it ll make the processor unstable.

For overclocking you need to disable those features, so the processor will run (always) to the speed you want it, which will make it consume more power, and also run kinda hotter compared to the processor runing with all those features enable.

If your cumputer shut down when it reaches 3.9ghz, forget about overclocking by software, just get into bios, disable all saving features (but no thermal throttle) and put the multiplier at 40 then leave everything at stock.


Also, remember not to tight too much the cooler on your MOBO, the MOBO pins that contact the processor may blend, causing the death of the mobo, at the best of case, it also may fry your processor, making a double death.

Just tight carefully, to secure it is on its place, but not too much, those pins are quite delicate.


It freaked me out honestly, I thought that I had a bad chip. I'll mess with BIOS soon and fix it up. I tried 4.0 today and it worked for a bit and then shut down.

I don't think that it's tight enough, and I think that I put too much paste on it.

Unrelated, but I had a friend that accidentally ripped his CPU out of the socket. (Cooler snapped off or something) All of the pins bent pretty badly, he sat there for like 2 hours with some intense magnifying glasses (looked like microscopes haha) and bent them all back.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 1, 2013 2:48:33 AM

I would not recommend overclocking through software... Its just never as safe or reliable in my personal opinion.

Here is the safe way to overclock:

To start, do this BEFORE overclocking -

1) Download coretemp and/or speedfan, and CPU-Z
2) Check your idle temperatures through coretemp and speedfan. Check your core voltage through CPU-Z
3) Make sure your idle temperatures are where they should be. My 3570k idles around 28-35C, if you idle much higher than that there is something wrong. You may need to reseat heatsink or reapply thermal paste correctly

Now, start to try overclocking...

Rule number 1 = Do not overclock multiple components at the same time. You overclock your CPU, Ram, and GPU at same time... Then you get an error or BSOD and have no idea what made your system unstable.
**Another point of interest** Intel does not recommend you send more than 1.5V of power to your RAM you can damage Ivy Bridge memory controller. I can tell you right now - its not flipping worth it to overvolt your ram. 1866 @ 1.5V should be more than adequate - potentially damaging your CPU in the long-term is not worth the performance gains.

I recommend start by OC the CPU. Things to do:

1) Read OC guides, I recommend multiple guides - not just 1. Especially not just the one I am writing right now that offers little to no explanation of HOW to actually OC
2) Updating BIOS may be neccessary. Read about it, and DO NOT update it through software. Screwing this up is a great way to turn your motherboard into a paperweight.
3) Adjust your CPU multiplier ONLY for overclocking. DO NOT increase your bus speed. If you increase your bus speed, you will send more voltage to other parts of your computer and potentially fry something.
4) Manually set your voltages in BIOS, make sure you don't FRY your computer parts. You should know 100% how to adjust voltages before you start playing around in BIOS. If you fry your computer, you have yourself to thank for it (not someone else writing a sloppy guide). I would start your OC by manually setting your RAM voltage to 1.5V, and make sure your timing and speeds are what was suggested on your package. If your RAM is XMP enabled- this is your best friend, use it. If you want to be "safe" I would recommend not sending more than 1.20 Volts to your CPU to start with.


Other notes:
* As above poster mentioned, disabling turbo and power savings options can be helpfull if not 100% neccessary to stabilize your overclock. I agree not to disable the thermal halt.
* If you didn't read other OC guides for at least a couple hours - you have no business playing in your BIOS. Consider yourself warned.
* Crashes and blue screens are not uncommon while overclocking.
* Overclock your CPU first to a safe level, then try overclocking other stuff

***The single most important things to know is that temperatures are your worst enemy on an Ivy Bridge system. High temperatures will result directly to the amount of voltage you send AND how high you clock. Intel TJMAX for 3570K is 105C, I personally don't want to push mine much over 70C***

High voltage and high temperatures = death to your expensive PC parts.

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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 1, 2013 2:56:53 AM

P.S. I am running my 3570K @ 4.2GHZ with:
1.20 V Core voltage
Average high 50's for temperatures while running AIDA64
Turbo boost disabled
Thermal Halt Enabled
EIST enabled
LCC at medium

And for other BIOS settings I followed a good guide, and recommend you do the same.

HAPPY NEW YEAR
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January 2, 2013 1:33:56 AM

Adroid said:
I would not recommend overclocking through software... Its just never as safe or reliable in my personal opinion.

Here is the safe way to overclock:

To start, do this BEFORE overclocking -

1) Download coretemp and/or speedfan, and CPU-Z
2) Check your idle temperatures through coretemp and speedfan. Check your core voltage through CPU-Z
3) Make sure your idle temperatures are where they should be. My 3570k idles around 28-35C, if you idle much higher than that there is something wrong. You may need to reseat heatsink or reapply thermal paste correctly

Now, start to try overclocking...

Rule number 1 = Do not overclock multiple components at the same time. You overclock your CPU, Ram, and GPU at same time... Then you get an error or BSOD and have no idea what made your system unstable.
**Another point of interest** Intel does not recommend you send more than 1.5V of power to your RAM you can damage Ivy Bridge memory controller. I can tell you right now - its not flipping worth it to overvolt your ram. 1866 @ 1.5V should be more than adequate - potentially damaging your CPU in the long-term is not worth the performance gains.

I recommend start by OC the CPU. Things to do:

1) Read OC guides, I recommend multiple guides - not just 1. Especially not just the one I am writing right now that offers little to no explanation of HOW to actually OC
2) Updating BIOS may be neccessary. Read about it, and DO NOT update it through software. Screwing this up is a great way to turn your motherboard into a paperweight.
3) Adjust your CPU multiplier ONLY for overclocking. DO NOT increase your bus speed. If you increase your bus speed, you will send more voltage to other parts of your computer and potentially fry something.
4) Manually set your voltages in BIOS, make sure you don't FRY your computer parts. You should know 100% how to adjust voltages before you start playing around in BIOS. If you fry your computer, you have yourself to thank for it (not someone else writing a sloppy guide). I would start your OC by manually setting your RAM voltage to 1.5V, and make sure your timing and speeds are what was suggested on your package. If your RAM is XMP enabled- this is your best friend, use it. If you want to be "safe" I would recommend not sending more than 1.20 Volts to your CPU to start with.


Other notes:
* As above poster mentioned, disabling turbo and power savings options can be helpfull if not 100% neccessary to stabilize your overclock. I agree not to disable the thermal halt.
* If you didn't read other OC guides for at least a couple hours - you have no business playing in your BIOS. Consider yourself warned.
* Crashes and blue screens are not uncommon while overclocking.
* Overclock your CPU first to a safe level, then try overclocking other stuff

***The single most important things to know is that temperatures are your worst enemy on an Ivy Bridge system. High temperatures will result directly to the amount of voltage you send AND how high you clock. Intel TJMAX for 3570K is 105C, I personally don't want to push mine much over 70C***

High voltage and high temperatures = death to your expensive PC parts.


My idles are fine, but at 4.0 I've seen as high as 80. I just am not having good luck overclocking it. I'll read some guides though.

I've read that about the RAM, which is why I didn't particularly want to increase the voltage.

I have a good list of guides bookmarked that I need to read when I have the time, I've just been busy haha.

I heard a few things about updating the BIOS but it freaked me out. I don't know if I should or not, I will research it. I don't really want to update it in case I screw something up.

I heard to never increase the bus speed on another guide as well. I have my BIOS multiplier set at 34, to reach the stock speed.

I don't know a whole lot about adjusting voltages, but I had to OC my RAM to get it to run at stock speed, and therefore had to increase the voltage. I set it to 1.5V though. I also set my CPU to 1.1V, but I was wondering if 1.0V would be sufficient.

Thanks for all of the help.
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January 6, 2013 1:08:59 AM

Just figured that I would post an update, I'm still researching stuff about the BIOS. However, I tightened my CPU Cooler a bit, retried with the extreme tuner, and I was able to hit 4.0 with only one core hitting 60 degree all the others stayed around 50-55.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 6, 2013 1:14:56 AM

That sounds like things are much closer to where they should be.
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a b à CPUs
January 6, 2013 1:39:50 AM

Pretty good, indeed. If you want to get a higher clock, just unsintall Extreme tuner and forget about kids play, you will need to get into your bios and start running your own overclock. No I5 is the same, so you may get good clocks, or not...
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January 9, 2013 9:02:08 PM

I have a break coming up, I'll be out of school for about 2 weeks. Gonna use that free time to research this stuff, I'll post results here!
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February 25, 2013 11:37:17 AM

Hi I am planning to buy DDR3 more than the processor's 1600Mhz like 1866 or 2000Mhz.

How will this work. Will the Mboard autometically reduce it to 1600Mhz until I overclock or will I have stabillity issues with Ram frequency more than 1600Mhz.


Thank You
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