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Computer Crashing after CPU OC

Last response: in Overclocking
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December 31, 2012 5:37:57 PM

Well before I Overclocked my Intel 2500k to 4.7GHz, then I was upgrading parts and reset my BIOS. I re-Overclocked to 4.7GHz and now once a day my computer will crash.

Now it doesn't crash during Gaming or Rendering or anything, just doing simple things like watching Netflix. I can go into my Bios and get all my settings but I'm wondering what may be causing this issue.

I believe I followed this guide, but am at x47 & +0.050Volts.

Quote:
Ok. I have the same mobo and CPU as you, and this is a 4.5ghz setting 100% stable.
Of course, if you so desire 4.0ghz, you should be able to leave everything at Default, and just change the CPU multiplier

CPU Multiplier x45
BCLK: 100mhz
Short and Long duration: 230/200.
core current limit 200
Vcore: OFFSET mode +0.020Volts
Load line calibration: LEVEL 4
Spread spectrum disabled
SpeedStep: on

Everything else leave auto.

max temps i get is 58C...H80 cooler. With a 212 expect like mid 60s

Everyone has a different 2500k, so test the voltage first. You might need higher or lower, but this is what worked successfully for me.
Don't forget to select a best answer!

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a b à CPUs
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December 31, 2012 5:52:58 PM

hello... try setting back your overclock... and see if that stops the problem.
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a c 102 à CPUs
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January 1, 2013 12:13:58 AM

CPUs differ among themselves depending upon from where the die was cut from the wafer. Some will perform better than others.

For your CPU 4.7 GHz seems too high and is causing instability. Lower the OC to 4.5 GHz and run it at the lowest voltage at which the CPU is stable. When it crashes, up the voltage a little bit (0.010V) - as always, closely monitor the temps.
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January 1, 2013 1:56:20 AM

Well the temps were normal on the Overclock, but I Un-Overclocked and things seem stable.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
January 1, 2013 2:14:55 AM

Typically when CPU is unstable and crashing you can

1) Add more voltage
or
2) Reduce overclock.

4.7 GHZ is pretty agressive. You might try 4.5 GHZ - Probably won't notice any decreased performance.

To get really good forum feedback you need to provide full system specs etc.
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January 1, 2013 4:06:58 AM

Adroid said:
Typically when CPU is unstable and crashing you can

1) Add more voltage
or
2) Reduce overclock.

4.7 GHZ is pretty agressive. You might try 4.5 GHZ - Probably won't notice any decreased performance.

To get really good forum feedback you need to provide full system specs etc.


I understand that, but what would cause it to become unstable? As it was previously.
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a b à CPUs
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January 1, 2013 6:44:30 AM

ISleepTheDayAway said:
I understand that, but what would cause it to become unstable? As it was previously.


Its hard to say, your original post was fairly vague. "I was adding more parts" doesn't give enough information to do anything with.

The new parts could also be a contributing factor.... No telling?
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a c 102 à CPUs
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January 1, 2013 12:17:51 PM

ISleepTheDayAway said:
I understand that, but what would cause it to become unstable? As it was previously.

Does your motherboard have the capability to supply a second 8-pins power to the CPU? This is recommended for severe OC as is your case.

I know that some motherboards like the EVGA Z77 has this second 8-pins power socket for the CPU power.
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a c 99 à CPUs
a c 231 K Overclocking
January 1, 2013 12:43:59 PM

ISleepTheDayAway said:
I understand that, but what would cause it to become unstable? As it was previously.


It probably was not as previously stable as you thought, most don't want to take the voltage to where it really needs to be to reach solid stability and you're using offset voltage settings anyway, according to what you've posted.

Offset voltage settings will allow a certain level of fluctuation which may have been just enough to cause your crashes.

Personally I use fixed voltage which brings more heat to be dissipated, but stops operating system fluctuations that can cause a crash, if the rest of your settings also work together to use fixed voltage in the first place.

When you said, "you followed this guide", it looks more like you followed someone elses suggestions?, which is really the best way to get into trouble, simply because what works for one may absolutely not work for someone else.

You may very well have followed a suggestion given to you by someone that was barely stable themselves.

If you want to follow a Guide, Here's one! (But make sure you have a good CPU cooling solution!)

Additionally regarding the 2500K an overclock past 4500mhz is really not necessary, especially if you are air cooling, it doesn't bring enough extra performance to the table to justify the extra voltage and heat to reach the multipliers above 45x.

Personally I would be the last person here to limit you past a simple caution, so whatever your goals are just remember you get there one step at a time.
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January 11, 2013 2:43:22 AM

Best answer selected by ISleepTheDayAway.
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a c 102 à CPUs
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January 11, 2013 9:20:08 AM

Thank you!
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March 18, 2013 3:40:53 AM

Ok people I need a help too!!! Does anyone know how to overclock intel E5200 2.5 Ghz on asrock g41c-gs motherboard.I have tried everything but when I change fsb on my cpu just for a little bit my computer restarts it self after short time. Please help !!!
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