Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Ssd question!

Last response: in Storage
Share
March 26, 2012 5:38:42 PM

hello,
I am building a new computer and i really don't use that much storage, so i was wondering if i could just buy a 256gb ssd and use it as my only drive.
The reason i ask, its because i have read that using an ssd as i would a normal hdd lowers the life of the ssd.
i was just wondering if this was true or just a myth?

Thanks in advance!!

More about : ssd question

a c 303 G Storage
March 26, 2012 6:53:31 PM

It's a matter of opinion. Writing to the drive does wear it out, but assorted testing (if I find a thread I'll post it here) shows that massive write usage, more than you or I are likely to generate, won't wear out the drive in 5 years. So I consider that to be a reasonable, if expensive, approach.

A few notes. First, backup early and backup often. Make sure that you have backups that can be restored to a brand-new SSD and have the system boot, in case your SSD fails.

Second, you will see a lot of argument about the wear the a pagefile on the SSD will generate, and whether you should do away with the page file. Both sides are right. If you have your page file on the SSD, make sure that you have plenty of memory to minimize paging.

One of the lovely things about an ssd-only machine is the elimination of one source of noise.
m
0
l
a b G Storage
March 26, 2012 7:05:46 PM

If you use less than 256 GB of space total, then a single SSD at that size would be fine for you. Worries about lifespan of SSDs is totally overblown, in my opinion. Normal HDDs fail all the damn time, and when they do they take terabytes of data with them. SSDs are more reliable, not less.

As long as you don't leave your SSD 99% full, you won't be wearing out its write cycles that fast. Given the rate at which SSD technology is progressing, I doubt many consumer drives today will be in use in another two or three years, which is a fairly common update cycle. In this case, the question of reliability isn't will the SSD last, it's by how much will it outlast every other component in your system.
m
0
l
Related resources
March 27, 2012 1:47:50 PM

SSD's can perform better overtime, It probably depends how you use it.I would suggest using separate SDD's for boot drive and apps but the bigger the ssd the better it performs overtime. This is a choice that is very much up to you.

If you care about spending the money get a 60-120gb ssd & 500gb HDD. If not go for!
m
0
l
March 27, 2012 2:00:38 PM

IMO going with what suave said would be the best bet. a relatively cheap 80 gig ssd for boot and some programs, then toss all your garbage on the hdd. although i know you said you dont store alot of data, it will be there incase you decide to start.
m
0
l
March 27, 2012 2:42:13 PM

Suave145 said:
SSD's can perform better overtime, It probably depends how you use it.I would suggest using separate SDD's for boot drive and apps but the bigger the ssd the better it performs overtime. This is a choice that is very much up to you.

If you care about spending the money get a 60-120gb ssd & 500gb HDD. If not go for!


Thanks for the reply,
I'm fairly new to building computers and I don't really know how to set up an ssd & hdd combination. So if you know of any easy to follow tutorials, I would really appreciate it!
Thanks!
m
0
l
a b G Storage
March 27, 2012 2:48:56 PM

I don't think there has been any conclusive evidence to indicate that you should worry about using a large solid state as your only storage on a computer. What type of system will this be going in - laptop or desktop?

If you're planning on using it in a laptop, I would use a 128-256GB SSD (depending on how much media you'll realistically need at your fingertips).

If you're planning on using it in a desktop, I would use a 80-128GB SSD for the OS and a separate HDD for your files. Transfer speeds between drives internally are pretty good so you can just move documents from your quick SSD storage to your HDD slower storage. You could also use an online storage platform for backup if you wanted to go that route.

It is important to pick the right tool for the job - I am a movie and music guy so I use a 120 GB Intel 520 SSD for my OS and a 1.5 TB HDD for my media, I have plenty of space for my OS & program files on the SSD so my applications launch quickly and I never have to worry about not having enough room for my media because it's on a separate disk.
m
0
l
April 15, 2012 9:15:40 PM

yogi6994 said:
Thanks for the reply,
I'm fairly new to building computers and I don't really know how to set up an ssd & hdd combination. So if you know of any easy to follow tutorials, I would really appreciate it!
Thanks!


When you install the os onto the ssd you can also put small programs on it. Ex SSD location name is C drive and you install games on the HDD named D drive or what ever just install it to that when it asks you where to put it. Follow?
m
0
l
!