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Cooling Systms - Liquid or Heatsink?

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March 8, 2010 8:19:47 AM

Hello

It seems quite hard for me, and possibly other people to decide which cooling system should we use. The liquid system seems nice, while the heatsinks seems more organised.

I am not so sure with the effieciency of these methods, can anyone make matters much more clearer to me?

Thank you guys again.
March 8, 2010 2:24:32 PM

If you are not going to overclock then the stock fan that comes with the CPU will be fine.

If you do plan on doing a bit of OC'ing then just about anything from this list will work fine.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm

If you are going to OC the heck out of your CPU or have a need for a quite machine then water is your way to go.

The corsair h50 is a closed loop water system for just the CPU and it gets decent numbers. Especially if you add an extra fan for push/pull.
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March 8, 2010 2:55:46 PM

Agreed. I do some moderate overclocking, and with a decent heatsink, it's quite adequate. It's not until you start jumping into the +1Ghz range that you'll need to consider water.

My Q6600 is at 3.4Ghz, on air, idling right now around 26C, never breaking 60C.

Water is a fun experience though, it just depends if you're comfortable pumping water around inside your case :) 
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March 8, 2010 8:16:22 PM

jack_attack said:
Agreed. I do some moderate overclocking, and with a decent heatsink, it's quite adequate. It's not until you start jumping into the +1Ghz range that you'll need to consider water.

My Q6600 is at 3.4Ghz, on air, idling right now around 26C, never breaking 60C.

Water is a fun experience though, it just depends if you're comfortable pumping water around inside your case :) 


I'd say it was more of a 'are you comfortable replacing every component inside that case if it leaks'

However, Water looks much 'cooler' as well as actually keeping the system cooler. however if u do go the water way, dont buy some cheap crap n make sure you check around google for reviews on the product.

Fans are easier to maintain and cheaper, even stock fans will allow you to overclock quite a bit depending on the cpu.

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March 8, 2010 9:24:33 PM

Yes, that too. I'm not :) 
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March 8, 2010 9:34:15 PM

I'm running an OC'd Phenom II x4 965 at a little under 3.8ghz, and it idles at 32C on a Sunbeam Core Contact Freezer with some TX2. Maxed out at 55-57C during Prime95...
Good enough for me...
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March 8, 2010 9:50:30 PM

someguynamedmatt said:
I'm running an OC'd Phenom II x4 965 at a little under 3.8ghz, and it idles at 32C on a Sunbeam Core Contact Freezer with some TX2. Maxed out at 55-57C during Prime95...
Good enough for me...


I'd have to agree that aftermarket cpu fans are much better than stock and can usually overclock very high. there isnt really much reason for water cooling.

I have used no cooling paste with my artic pro 7 cpu fan with my q6600 g0 steppin and my max temp is 56 ish that i have noticed. (one of those things i forgot to buy, although cpu's do have some pre-applied paste on them)

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March 8, 2010 10:01:41 PM

Yeah, as lindley said, if you have a big enough case, a good heatsink and fan can easily bring down a cheap water cooling system. The Corsair H50 isn't exactly a top-of-the-line WCS, and even though it's probably one of the better built ones you can find, I've seen many benchmarks where the Prolimatech Megahalems have stomped it into the dust. It's pretty comparable to the Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme from what I've seen in benchmarks, actually. Sorry, Corsair... I still love your RAM, though... :whistle: 
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March 9, 2010 2:19:37 AM

Well, I want to overclock my Intel Core i7 920 to probably 3.6-4.5GHz. Are there any good liquid cooling systems, my local IT Store only has ThermalTake ProWater 850 and BigWater 770 which I am trying to avoid.
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March 9, 2010 2:31:30 AM

May I ask why you need such high speeds, boon_pek?
In my opinion it's easier and safer to go for the conventional heatsink + fan combo. If you're able to fill one of your pump systems with a non-conductive liquid such as a mineral oil, then go for it. I would never put any unnecessary cooling in the system that risks the components more than a few extra degrees would.
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March 9, 2010 12:50:53 PM

I'd agree with tom, 4.5ghz? Really? I can't think of any reason at all why you would need a i7 to run at that speed.
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