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Which build would be better for gaming

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March 9, 2010 8:01:53 PM

Which build would be better for pretty much just pc games and firefox.

Intel Build:

# Antec EarthWatts, 650W Power Supply [ PSU ]. Model: EA650
# Intel Core i7-860, LGA 1156, 2.8GHz, 64-Bit Quad-Core
# Intel factory Auto-RPM Silent CPU Air Cool
# MSI Intel P55, 8GB DDR3 Max, CrossFireX, RAID,1394, eSATA, Audio, GbLAN. [ P55M-GD45 ]
# 8GB (4 x 2GB) DDR3 at 1333 MHz Dual Channel
# Radeon HD 5850: 1024MB [ DirectX 11 Support ]
# Seagate 750GB Serial ATA-II 7200RPM w/ 16MB Buffer
# Standard Setting : Non-RAID
# 22x Dual-Format/Dual-Layer DVDRW Driver
# High Definition 7.1 Digtial Surround Sound
# Onboard Gigabit LAN Network

AMD Build:

# Antec EarthWatts, 650W Power Supply [ PSU ]. Model: EA650
# AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition, Socket AM3, 3.4GHz, 64-Bit Quad-Core, 4x512KB Cache
# AMD factory Auto-RPM Silent CPU Air Cool
# MSI AMD 790X, AM3, 8GB DDR3 Max, CrossFireX, RAID, Audio, GbLAN. [ 790X-G45 ]
# 8GB (4 x 2GB) DDR3 at 1333 MHz Dual Channel
# Radeon HD 5870: 1024MB [ DirectX 11 Support ]
# Xtreme Performance in SLI/CrossFireX Gaming Mode Supports Single Monitor
# Seagate 750GB Serial ATA-II 7200RPM w/ 16MB Buffer
# Standard Setting : Non-RAID
# 22x Dual-Format/Dual-Layer DVDRW Driver
# High Definition 7.1 Digtial Surround Sound
# Onboard Gigabit LAN Network

Both systems would be run on windows 7, I will do absolutely no overclocking, and I will eventually add another 5850 to the intel or a 5870 or the AMD, but will definitely get a better psu when I do. Thanks for the help, I really appreciate it.

More about : build gaming

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March 9, 2010 8:05:24 PM

Assuming these are pre-built (just based on the formatting), the AMD build is better, you don't need the hyperthreading that the i7 has, and the beefier graphics card on the AMD system will provide more real gaming benefit.

You also really don't need 8 GB for gaming, 4 is just fine.

As a standard disclaimer though, this is a homebuilt forum, and most people here are going to recommend that you build your own system.
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March 9, 2010 8:07:13 PM

Both are pretty poor gaming builds, but the second would be better. Might want to follow the guidelines for better advice.

Here's a much gaming build:

CPU/Mobo: X4 955 and Gigabyte GA-790XTA-UD4 $265 after rebate
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws 2x2 GB 1600 mhz CAS Latency 7 $115
HDD: Seagate 7200.12 500 GB $55
Case: HAF 922 $90
GPU: HD 5870 $380
PSU: Corsair 750W 80+ $100
Optical: Cheap SATA DVD burner $24
HSF (only if overclocking): Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus $35

Total: $1,064.

Of course, I'm just guessing at the actually budget. If I had a definite number, I'd be willing to bet I'd give you a better build...
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March 9, 2010 8:20:02 PM

well, to answer your question, the amd would. but, there are many improvement you could make to either build:

CPU: since the 965 cost 200$ now, and the 860 makes no sense for gaming, i would get the i5 750, with this mobo:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

MOBO: above, its better than the one you picked...

RAM: i would get this ram:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

it is better, and probs cheaper. also, i highly recommend only getting 4 gigs of good ram, vs 8 gigs of ok ram. also, if you are gaming, you will see no extra performance.

VID: get the 5870, but to get the 8.3% off, you have to go to bing, type in laptop, and click tiger direct:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

HDD: get either a samsung f3, or a seagate 7200.12 at either 500 gigs or 1 tb, nothing else.

everything else looks ok, but thats my advice...it will probs be cheaper too.
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March 9, 2010 8:26:37 PM

Okay, thanks for the info. A local shopkeeper built these 2 pc's. He says he can make changes, but it will probably cost more. The intel pc is about $1320, and the AMD is about $1350. I'm leaning toward the AMD because it seems like the I7 won't give me as much of a boost over the 965 as the Radeon 5870 will over the 5850. I will eventually add another, better hard drive to the pc, and another 5870 eventually, but will definitely need a better psu, right?
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March 9, 2010 8:31:58 PM

Not really the Antec 650 Earth watts is a good PSU.
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March 9, 2010 8:36:58 PM

So, you're saying that I could add another hard drive and a 5870 with this psu?
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March 9, 2010 8:53:50 PM

coldsleep said:
Assuming these are pre-built (just based on the formatting), the AMD build is better, you don't need the hyperthreading that the i7 has, and the beefier graphics card on the AMD system will provide more real gaming benefit.

You also really don't need 8 GB for gaming, 4 is just fine.

As a standard disclaimer though, this is a homebuilt forum, and most people here are going to recommend that you build your own system.



+1^, simply for the 5870 really, and you will ALWAYS be better of building your own system.
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March 10, 2010 4:36:56 PM

Aright, thank you very much. You've all been extremely helpful. I've decided to get his AMD build because:

-He said he could take out one of the 2gb sticks of ram and change the price to $1309

-The next AMD cpu's are compatible with the motherboard

-The 5870 is much better than the 5850

-The AMD 965 will perform pretty much the same as the Intel 860 as far as gaming goes.

-The AMD comes in a sweet looking case that is bigger, and will probably have enough room for another 5870 when I am ready for it

Thanks again, you've all helped me a lot. I really appreciate it.
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March 10, 2010 4:42:28 PM

A quick note. He should take out TWO of the RAM sticks. The AM3 boards use dual channel memory, meaning it runs best if you have sticks in pairs. Removing just one stick would leave 3x2 GB of RAM, which will operate a lot slower. See if he'll take out two sticks and charge you $1,259.
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March 10, 2010 4:49:12 PM

Oh, thanks. I can't believe I missed that. Hey, quick question. Would it be better if I eventually added two 4gb sticks rather than two 2gb sticks to put into the extra two slots?
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March 10, 2010 4:56:24 PM

Maybe. That would technically satisfy the dual channel requirement, but you may have compatibility issues if the 4 GB sticks don't have matching voltages, timings, and speeds to the 2 GB sticks.

Also, 4 GB sticks are crazy expensive right now. You'd probably be better off adding 2x2 GB sticks later on (8 GB isn't needed now), then later upgrading to 4x4 GB sticks if necessary (it won't be).
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March 10, 2010 4:58:32 PM

Okay, thanks.
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March 10, 2010 4:58:49 PM

KBlack said:
Oh, thanks. I can't believe I missed that. Hey, quick question. Would it be better if I eventually added two 4gb sticks rather than two 2gb sticks to put into the extra two slots?


As long as you add sticks with the same specs as the original set, then it shouldn't matter too much (increase from 4 GB to 12 GB with 2x 4 GB sticks). And it won't matter at all if you completely replace your RAM (increase from 4 GB to 8 GB by replacing with 2x 4 GB sticks vs. increase to 8 GB by adding 2x 2 GB sticks). You should base that future decision on the price difference and your system requirements.

Unless you start doing a lot of photoshop or audio/video editing (or running a bunch of virtual machines), 4 GB is likely to last you for a while (at least a couple of years, if not longer). Barring any unforseen killer app that requires a ton of memory, of course.

EDIT: Beaten to the punch by MadAdmiral, as per usual. :p 
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March 10, 2010 5:07:42 PM

Okay, so I have to make sure the 4gb stick have the same timings as the 2gb sticks it started with?
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March 10, 2010 5:29:23 PM

KBlack said:
Okay, so I have to make sure the 4gb stick have the same timings as the 2gb sticks it started with?


You can try running with a mismatched set, but at best, you're going to run with the slower timings. At worst, you won't be able to boot to the OS. It's always best to match timings, voltage, etc. when adding RAM.

Again, if you chose to completely replace the 2 GB sticks with 4 GB sticks, you wouldn't have to worry about it. (But you would be shelving perfectly good RAM.)
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March 10, 2010 5:42:06 PM

Yes, but notice how 4 GB sticks are over twice as expensive as 2 GB sticks. And to reiterate, you DON'T NEED MORE THAN 4 GB of RAM.
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March 10, 2010 5:47:24 PM

Not to be incredibly redundant, but MadAdmiral is right. For gaming, you don't need more than 4 GB right now. You really only need more than 4 GB if you're going to be doing a lot of memory-intensive tasks, like HEAVY Photoshop use, audio or video editing, CAD, or other things like that.

Save the money on RAM right now. Put it towards something more useful or just save it and buy more RAM in a couple of years if you feel like you need it then.
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March 10, 2010 5:47:54 PM

Yeah, you're right. Okay, I'm done. Thanks for all the help. I really appreciate it.
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March 10, 2010 5:50:31 PM

Best answer selected by KBlack.
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