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Help with first time watercooled system

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 10, 2013 4:10:48 PM

Im currently in the process of building a new system for my work for use with programs like Revit which runs off the CPU. I also use programs like 3D Max, Maya, Lumion so I need a decent Graphics card, but my thought is to build a rendering farm in the future.

My Current build thought is
CPU: i7 Extreme
MB: ROG Rampage
PSU: Corsair AX1200i
RAM: 32GB Corsair Dominator Platnium
SSD: For progams and OS 2x240 Corsair Neutron 1 Primary one back up
HDD: 1T For files
GPU: I have a GTX 680 I plan to put in this system, with other rendering working on a future render farm.

I would like to run the CPU at about 4.2, but would like the option to push it further in the future. As I have never done a watercooled system, can someone guide me in what they think is the best on pumps, fittings, blocks and res. As well as what you think about my propsed system.
January 10, 2013 11:58:00 PM

On the watercooling end, mlcaouette's link is good for what you need to know. I would say specifically that compression fittings are probably the easiest and cleanest looking. I would also say that you are probably better off with clear coolant and colored tubing if you are planning to go that route. I went with the clear tubing and colored coolant, and the tubing doesn't look that great after a while.

As for your build, I'm not so sure about the reasoning behind using two SSDs with one as backup. I would personally recommend just one SSD for the programs and OS, and get a mechanical drive to not only backup the OS, but your work. It would be cheaper. That's my view of it, but maybe someone has a different idea.
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a c 78 K Overclocking
January 11, 2013 5:21:09 PM

OP - question, dya plan on playing games while you wont be working on those rendering softwares? I game as much as I render and work off of autocad and photoshop. The latter has support for optimization with GPU's the former is more cpu intensive but with the workstation line up of cards made specifically for offloading cpu duty, I think the Quadro or Firepro cards in your lineup.

That being said, I don't think they make waterblocks for workstation grade graphics cards. You could go with a cpu only loop, but then again we need you to understand the need for cooling on a Ivy Bridge - E system.

+ 1 to reading the watercooling sticky and the other point is yeah, would you need two SSD's? one is more than plenty and a larger storage drive would be better - perhaps 2~3 x 1TB drives

case selection will also govern some of your loops layout.
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January 11, 2013 11:55:31 PM

Thanks for the information, I dont play games, but not opposed to playing from time to time, but its really just for me to work on. The Watercooling would really be for the CPU so I can obtain a min 4.6 to speed up the processors while I work and render inside of Revit. If I moved my GTX 680 in the system, I would also hit that with the loop, but for major rendering, I am really thinking to go with a render farm as I think I can build it cheaper than trying to get the pro cards I would need.

On case, I do like my 600T, I know that it will require some modding, which I am not opposed to doing. The size of it is about perfect to me, with a full size case being just to big in my opinion.

I know I could go with a system just for the CPU like the H-100, but from what I have read building your own system is better and you can push the processors more. The goal is to hold off till the Ivy Bridge E is out and then keep that chip for 3 to 5 years by continuing to pushthe chip.

On tubbing, I was thinking about colored tubbing, but what about the ability to see the liquid with it? Do you just check at the res? Also how often should you be replacing tubbing and water? every year?
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a c 150 K Overclocking
January 12, 2013 7:12:00 AM

cbjones said:
Thanks for the information, I dont play games, but not opposed to playing from time to time, but its really just for me to work on. The Watercooling would really be for the CPU so I can obtain a min 4.6 to speed up the processors while I work and render inside of Revit. If I moved my GTX 680 in the system, I would also hit that with the loop, but for major rendering, I am really thinking to go with a render farm as I think I can build it cheaper than trying to get the pro cards I would need.

On case, I do like my 600T, I know that it will require some modding, which I am not opposed to doing. The size of it is about perfect to me, with a full size case being just to big in my opinion.

I know I could go with a system just for the CPU like the H-100, but from what I have read building your own system is better and you can push the processors more. The goal is to hold off till the Ivy Bridge E is out and then keep that chip for 3 to 5 years by continuing to pushthe chip.

On tubbing, I was thinking about colored tubbing, but what about the ability to see the liquid with it? Do you just check at the res? Also how often should you be replacing tubbing and water? every year?

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/281840-29-corsair-600...
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a c 78 K Overclocking
January 12, 2013 8:37:08 AM

Quote:
On tubing, I was thinking about colored tubing, but what about the ability to see the liquid with it? Do you just check at the res? Also how often should you be replacing tubing and water? every year?
watercooling sticky, in my sig has alot of those questions detailed. Be patient and read it through. At the end of it you'll have a pretty smile for knowing alot about WC'ing :) 

IF its going to be located in the office, might want to reconsider a Fractal Design case.
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