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SSD and truecrypt okay now?

Last response: in Storage
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April 1, 2012 6:04:23 PM

When I googled putting truecrypt on the SSD I got a bunch of dire warnings from people saying that it was a horrible thing to do and should "never be done" (this thread http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/270227-32-truecrypt is the first in the google search)

However, when I tried it I benchmarked the SSD with and without encryption. My boot time was exactly the same. I'm running a new cpu with the AES-NI instructions so even though I disabled multi-threading in truecrypt (to save power) It STILL can encrypt data faster than the SSD can serve it (500+ MB/s)

Truecrypt now supports TRIM commands, the SSD uses synchronous flash so it's not slowed down as much by incompressible data and SSDs are a lot higher quality now so you don't have to worry about "wearing them out"

Is there any reason not to be doing this anymore?

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a c 289 G Storage
April 2, 2012 7:51:17 PM

Well, truecrypt's site still recommends against it. I would think that they understand the software fairly well.

There are two issues with this combo. One is that data can be recovered unencrypted; the other is that with increased write amplification you can lose performance and will increase the rate at which your SSD wears out.

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April 2, 2012 9:27:24 PM

I notice you are using "synchronous flash" this is the reason you are not taking a huge performance hit. This is still Sandforce's main weakness. But as for "not doing it" I see no logical reasons for it. If you need encryption for whatever reason, you use encryption... stuff like your SSD will last only 9 years, and not 10 years comes secondary. Or, at least it does to me.

Good luck :D 
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April 4, 2012 4:26:00 AM

WyomingKnott said:
Well, truecrypt's site still recommends against it. I would think that they understand the software fairly well.

There are two issues with this combo. One is that data can be recovered unencrypted; the other is that with increased write amplification you can lose performance and will increase the rate at which your SSD wears out.


Well if there is a performance loss, it's not showing up in any of my benchhmarks. Everything I do on this computer is just instantaneous now. Also does it really matter if my drive wears out in 6 years instead of 8? (SSDlife pro estimation)

In 6 years, I'll be able to rebuy this same drive for 20 bucks, lol. Thank you moore's law!
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