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Eyepiece shutter where none built into camera?

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Anonymous
November 30, 2004 1:03:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've just ordered a factory refurbished Olympus C-2020Z with a 5 year
extended
warranty, which should give me enough time to gain some experience in IR
and
UV photography with the same camera. However, I've now just read online
that
an eyepiece shutter is quite important for these types of photography, to
keep
out unwanted visible light when using a tripod with a remote or
self-timer.
However, apparently the 2020 doesn't come with an eyepiece shutter.

A piece of black electrician's tape over the view-finder is recommended
as a
stop-gap, but since I plan to use this camera just for UV and IR, I'm not
looking for stop gaps. Someone told me that instead of taping over the
camera's
eyepiece, I should get an eyecup and use tape over that, but that doesn't
really
seem like a solution to me.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks alot.

Dale Bricker
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 2:12:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 30 Nov 2004 10:03:18 -0600, in rec.photo.digital Dale Bricker
<dbricker@cyburban.com> wrote:

>I've just ordered a factory refurbished Olympus C-2020Z with a 5 year
>extended
>warranty, which should give me enough time to gain some experience in IR
>and
>UV photography with the same camera. However, I've now just read online
>that
>an eyepiece shutter is quite important for these types of photography, to
>keep
>out unwanted visible light when using a tripod with a remote or
>self-timer.
>However, apparently the 2020 doesn't come with an eyepiece shutter.

This is only pertinent to slr camera, not your C-2020Z
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990 and 5700 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 9:22:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dale Bricker <dbricker@cyburban.com> writes:

> I've just ordered a factory refurbished Olympus C-2020Z with a 5
> year extended warranty, which should give me enough time to gain
> some experience in IR and UV photography with the same camera.
> However, I've now just read online that an eyepiece shutter is quite
> important for these types of photography, to keep out unwanted
> visible light when using a tripod with a remote or self-timer.
> However, apparently the 2020 doesn't come with an eyepiece shutter.

You don't need one.

There is no light path connecting the viewfinder on the Oly 2020z, to
the sensor, so no stray light from the viewfinder can hit the sensor.

The eyepiece shutter advice you've read only apply to SLRs.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
========================================================================
When you say you live in the real world, which one are you referring to?
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 9:22:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gisle Hannemyr wrote:

> Dale Bricker <dbricker@cyburban.com> writes:
>
>> I've just ordered a factory refurbished Olympus C-2020Z with a 5
>> year extended warranty, which should give me enough time to gain
>> some experience in IR and UV photography with the same camera.
>> However, I've now just read online that an eyepiece shutter is quite
>> important for these types of photography, to keep out unwanted
>> visible light when using a tripod with a remote or self-timer.
>> However, apparently the 2020 doesn't come with an eyepiece shutter.
>
> You don't need one.
>
> There is no light path connecting the viewfinder on the Oly 2020z, to
> the sensor, so no stray light from the viewfinder can hit the sensor.
>
> The eyepiece shutter advice you've read only apply to SLRs.


This is one of the pitfalls of declaring all cameras DSLRs and ZLRs
because they are "SLR like".

It causes confusion.. With a *true* DSLR you definitely have to
block the viewfinder on occasion.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 12:29:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> This is one of the pitfalls of declaring all cameras DSLRs and ZLRs
> because they are "SLR like".
>
> It causes confusion.. With a *true* DSLR you definitely have to
> block the viewfinder on occasion.
>
A previous discussion determined that my E-10 was not a DSLR or ZLR...yet it
does have and need an eyepiece shutter...so maybe some other cameras use
them too? Or you can let me join your club (Oh...Please...Please...Please!)
But, whatever....your agenda based answer did not apply here...nobody is
calling the 2020 an slr of any sort. Its not anything like.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 12:29:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I thought I understood cameras pretty well, but what exactly is an
eyepiece "shutter"? I have a number of film SLRs, and none have an
eyepiece shutter. Why is an eyepiece shutter necessary on a digital
SLR?


"Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message news:<9agrd.3098$_C2.698@trndny01>...
> > This is one of the pitfalls of declaring all cameras DSLRs and ZLRs
> > because they are "SLR like".
> >
> > It causes confusion.. With a *true* DSLR you definitely have to
> > block the viewfinder on occasion.
> >
> A previous discussion determined that my E-10 was not a DSLR or ZLR...yet it
> does have and need an eyepiece shutter...so maybe some other cameras use
> them too? Or you can let me join your club (Oh...Please...Please...Please!)
> But, whatever....your agenda based answer did not apply here...nobody is
> calling the 2020 an slr of any sort. Its not anything like.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 1:07:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Stauffer in Minneapolis" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:a5a17b6f.0412010602.1b69f063@posting.google.com...
>I thought I understood cameras pretty well, but what exactly is an
> eyepiece "shutter"? I have a number of film SLRs, and none have an
> eyepiece shutter. Why is an eyepiece shutter necessary on a digital
> SLR?
>

Light entering the camera through the eyepiece can affect metering and
exposure. Not a huge deal, but it can affect the images. My D2H and all
pro-body cameras from Nikon (F5, D1, D1H, D1X, D2H, D2X) all have a lever
next to the eyepiece that you can flip down a shutter completely blocking
the eyepiece. All other Nikon SLR and dSLR cameras come with a little
plastic piece (that is almost immediately lost) that can be slipped over the
eyepiece and block it (less conveniently, but just as effectively). One
little side benefit is that the eyepiece can't be unscrewed while the
shutter is open so that it's less likely to come unscrewed and get lost.

I rarely use the eyepiece shutter except maybe on long tripod eposures. Most
of my shooting is with my eye at the eyepiece and I have the accessory DK-1
eyecup which, when my eye is at the eyepiece, effectively blocks most of the
light anyway.

HMc
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 1:31:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Stauffer in Minneapolis wrote:

> I thought I understood cameras pretty well, but what exactly is an
> eyepiece "shutter"? I have a number of film SLRs, and none have an
> eyepiece shutter. Why is an eyepiece shutter necessary on a digital
> SLR?

SLR's (not just digital) see through the lens with the use of
a mirror. Light goes both ways. If you hold a flashlight up to the
viewfinder and look into the lens, you'll see light from the
flashlight.

If stray light gets in the veiwfinder, it can be sensed by the metering
circuitry and throw the exposure off.

Normally, you have your eye blocking the viewfinder as you peer through
it so stray light isn't a problem. But, if you're shooting with a remote
shutter release, the eyepiece isn't covered. If there is ambient light
behind the camera, it can enter the viewfinder and interfere with metering.

You might not have had an eyepiece shutter on any of your cameras, but they
are available. They're not uncommon in high end cameras. (Look up the
specs of the Nikon F4)

I don't know about others, but Canon includes one built into the carry strap
of the 10D. You can slide off the rubber eyepiece cushion and slide on the
strap mounted eyepiece shutter to block unwanted light.

I used mine last month, when I used my remote release to do short time exposures
of the northern lights.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 7:49:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

stauffer@usfamily.net (Don Stauffer in Minneapolis) writes:
> I thought I understood cameras pretty well, but what exactly is an
> eyepiece "shutter"?

It is a small lever-operated shutter that you close to prevent light
from entering the mirror-box of an SLR through the eye-piece.

> I have a number of film SLRs, and none have an eyepiece shutter.

Are you sure?
I own two SLRs (a Nikon F2 and a N90s) - and both have one.
I believe they are commonplace (they are very simple devices).

> Why is an eyepiece shutter necessary on a digital SLR?

No photographer keeps his eye to the eyepiece during bulb type
exposures. When the eyepiece is open - light will enter it.
Some of this stray light may find its way around the mirror
and enter the mirror box of the SLR where it, during a long
exposure, may fog the film or the sensor.

To prevent this from happening, you close the eyepiece shutter
before using bulb. (For normal exposures, the eye and the mirror
is suffiscient to keep stray light out of the mirror box.)
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
========================================================================
When you say you live in the real world, which one are you referring to?
!