Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Another CPU/FSB question!

Tags:
Last response: in CPUs
Share
May 20, 2010 11:35:41 AM

Hi guys,

I'm a definite novice when it comes to PC building, but i've been doing my research, and have just ordered all the parts for my first custom build (quite a cheap one at that). Here's the mobo/CPU/Memory i've bought (I actually bought these pieces seperatly on ebuyer for a lower price, but this is just for quick reference):

http://www.awd-it.co.uk/scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=...

and here's the RAM I chose (the bundle's RAM was just a generic variety): http://www.ebuyer.com/product/166995

Now my question is this- If the DDR3 memory operates at 1333Mhz, the motherboard can support 1333Mhz (OC), and the processor's bus runs at 800Mhz, how will these interact? Will the RAM just safely downclock to 800Mhz and run normally? And also, do I have the option later to clock the CPU speed to operate it's bus at 1333? I'm worrying myself now that they won't be compatible- even though they come as part of a bundle.

Thanks in Advance,
Mark

More about : cpu fsb question

a b à CPUs
May 20, 2010 1:15:17 PM

The motherboard will use a divider to attempt to run the memory at rated speed. I would need the make of the motherboard, but most Gigabyte boards overclock pretty well. Later on if you want to experiment, you should be able to run your FSB at 333 for a 1:2 FSB to ram ratio. You will probably need to drop the cpu multiplyer down a notch or two to achieve this. I would do some reading in the forums in the overclocking sections before you jump in and start messing around. Good luck
m
0
l
May 20, 2010 2:27:54 PM

Thanks for the reply! The overclocking won't be a huge deal, I was just more worried that the clash of speeds might cause instability in the system.
m
0
l
Related resources
May 20, 2010 2:44:01 PM

sportsfanboy said:
The motherboard will use a divider to attempt to run the memory at rated speed. I would need the make of the motherboard, but most Gigabyte boards overclock pretty well. Later on if you want to experiment, you should be able to run your FSB at 333 for a 1:2 FSB to ram ratio. You will probably need to drop the cpu multiplyer down a notch or two to achieve this. I would do some reading in the forums in the overclocking sections before you jump in and start messing around. Good luck


What benefit does a 1:2 FSB to RAM ratio provide?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
May 20, 2010 3:46:26 PM

1:2 is one of many dividers, so the benefits will depend on what base your starting from. In his case, the ram will be running a bit closer to the FSB speed, so the latency will be a tad lower.
m
0
l
!