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(random) distilled water + pc.

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March 12, 2010 6:41:46 PM

When i was at school a few years ago, the physics teacher put the PC in a oil(not sure what exact oil it was), (obviously without the case) and it worked.

Im wondering if this could be done with Distilled water if not, maybe double distilled water?

as pure water does not conduct, wouldn't this work? Not only this, would it keep the pc cool? Fans would probably have to be removed off heatsinks etc as well


like the title says, just a random thought.

More about : random distilled water

a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 6:49:00 PM

Yes, but it doesn't take long for even dust to end up in it and making it no longer totally pure. Heck, you might even have particles from your fingers on components when you put it together that would dissolve and make the water conductive again. So it still isn't worth the risk.
March 12, 2010 6:51:26 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
Yes, but it doesn't take long for even dust to end up in it and making it no longer totally pure. Heck, you might even have particles from your fingers on components when you put it together that would dissolve and make the water conductive again. So it still isn't worth the risk.


Oh i wouldnt try it with my pc.

Maybe some old piece of *** that no one wants. and yeah, the water would need some kind of lid to stop particles gettin inside, and the mobo etc would need cleaning properly beforehand.

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a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 6:56:33 PM

liquid cooling

distilled water is used mostly but there are other liquids
March 12, 2010 6:59:34 PM

obsidian86 said:
liquid cooling



I dont think you understood, i dont care about a real liquid cooling kit. I was talking about immersing the whole pc in distilled water. And how the whole pc immersed under water would be affected.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 7:00:06 PM

He wants to see it if you can do with just water what you could with submerged parts in mineral oil.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 7:13:48 PM

cant be done the board and metal parts will degrade in the first week then a gianT BUZZT and poof
a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 7:33:13 PM

I believe the answer you're looking for is: mineral oil.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtufuXLvOok

And no, I wouldn't do it with any sort of water. From wikipedia (grain of salt, etc.):

Quote:
Pure water containing no ions is an excellent insulator, but not even "deionized" water is completely free of ions. Water undergoes auto-ionization in the liquid state. Further, because water is such a good solvent, it almost always has some solute dissolved in it, most frequently a salt. If water has even a tiny amount of such an impurity, then it can conduct electricity readily, as impurities such as salt separate into free ions in aqueous solution by which an electric current can flow.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 7:55:55 PM

Distillation is not deionizing. It is boiling and using what condensates. It is totally free of anything. I was referring to the fact that it likely wouldn't take long for it to dissolve something. The part about auto-ionization, in short, is why neutral water gets a pH of 7; IIRC it doesn't actually pass electricity in that state.

So it is possible but I don't think it would last.
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 7:59:43 PM

You put your PC in a case with water, and your making a very expensive brick. A wet, metallic brick.
March 12, 2010 8:45:33 PM

MadAdmiral said:
You put your PC in a case with water, and your making a very expensive brick. A wet, metallic brick.


Sorry admiral but i dont think you understand water in this case, water conducts electricity because of impurities in the water, minerals, salts, etc. double distilled water is extremely pure. Therefore it cannot conduct electricity.

And like i said in a previous post, i wouldn't dream about trying it with my pc. more likely a old piece of shít that no one wants.

And i wouldnt put water in the case, the motherboard etc goes inside a plastic container, which is filled with super distilled water, or mineral oil, which seems to be a better option.

P.s that youtube video is nice example and a nice video, looks cool with the blue light, made me lol with the 'what would a aquarium be without bubbles'

although on the video, you can see the fans moving extremely slow, wouldnt this burn the bearing outs? Would this damage the psu if the fan burnt out? or do bearings only burn out when they get too hot? (with the mineral oil should keep it cool?)


a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2010 9:35:40 PM

You could disconnect all the fans but the PSU fan if you were concerned about it. And even have the PSU itself out of the "case"
March 12, 2010 10:10:06 PM

Even though the water may be distilled, it would still oxidize some of the metal components on the PCBs. A heat source would increase the oxidation rate further since it allows the oxygen atoms to dissociate from the water molecule more easily.
March 12, 2010 10:16:07 PM

hobbes_tx said:
Even though the water may be distilled, it would still oxidize some of the metal components on the PCBs. A heat source would increase the oxidation rate further since it allows the oxygen atoms to dissociate from the water molecule more easily.

Yeah, so mineral oil is better. But what does mineral oil do/doesnt do, that double distilled water does/doesnt do.
March 12, 2010 10:54:55 PM

Mineral oil is a primarily a non-polar molecule but water is very polar.

A molecule that is polar can dissolve ionic compounds most of which contain a metal atom. For example, salt is an ionic molecule. When it is put in water it dissolves into Na+ and Cl-. Na is Sodium, a metal, which conducts electricity and this is how water conducts electricity.

A non-polar molecule like oil is primarily made of hydrogen and carbon atoms. These can dissolve covalent-bonded molecules by the property of hydrogen bonding. Most non-polar molecules do not contain any metals so they are very poor conductors of electricity.

Of course there are situations where this doesn't apply but for the most part is does.
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