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Thermal adhesive/troubleshooting for hot northbridge heatsink

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January 13, 2013 7:45:03 PM

First I will point out that I am not doing any overclocking on my computer yet, but I figured you folks would have the most experience with this topic. I recently upgraded my computer from stock components to 16GB RAM, 3.4 Ghz AMD Phenom II X4 965 processor, and a XFX Radeon HD 6670 video card. I haven't changed any other settings in the BIOS either, so the only change made to the system were with those hardware upgrades.

Then I basically had a northbridge that was getting pretty warm (60-70C) just when watching videos online (1080p) or with Skype after I upgraded my video card and processor. Idle was around 47-50°C. From what I've been able to gather these are pretty hot temps for a northbridge. It seemed like the stock heatsink wasn't doing the trick even after I replaced the stock TIM with Arctic Silver 5 paste. I found a bigger heatsink with a fan, but the downside to my motherboard is that it uses clips instead of the pushpins. Seems that there are few clip style heatsinks sold, and none of the other clip style heatsinks I've found fit on my motherboard due to other components getting in the way. The new heatsink can be attached with clips, but it's somewhat loose. It does bump my temperatures down slightly compared to the stock heatsink right after I have made sure it's seated correctly, but since it is top-heavy, it tends to move a little and becomes slightly unseated. That results in temperatures even worse than the stock heatsink.

Now I'm at the point of considering some kind of adhesive to secure this heatsink down better. I've seen two main options:

1. Put a small amount of superglue at the corners of the chipset, with thermal paste on the rest.
2. Go with an epoxy for a very permanent seat.

I'm worried about using an adhesive, but later finding out it moved slightly during the process resulting being seated improperly, but not being able to fix it. It sounds like the superglue method isn't quite a permanent as you should be able to carefully removed the heatsink if needed, but it kind of sounds like a Mickey Mouse set up that's asking for trouble down the line too. Any advice on how best to make a heatsink like this stay put while also making sure it's seated correctly?

The other things bothering me is that the stock heatsink seemed warm just for idle temperatures. Unfortunately being a novice I never thought of checking temperatures before I upgraded everything, so I don't know what this northbridge ran at prior. However, other folks have been getting similar temperatures as me, but they were overclocking, while I'm not. Is there anything else I should take a look at that may be raising the northbridge temps due to any of the components installed (RAM, CPU, GPU)?

If there's any other information you might need that might be helpful in figuring this out just let me know.
August 6, 2013 3:21:19 AM

kingofaces said:
First I will point out that I am not doing any overclocking on my computer yet, but I figured you folks would have the most experience with this topic. I recently upgraded my computer from stock components to 16GB RAM, 3.4 Ghz AMD Phenom II X4 965 processor, and a XFX Radeon HD 6670 video card. I haven't changed any other settings in the BIOS either, so the only change made to the system were with those hardware upgrades.

Then I basically had a northbridge that was getting pretty warm (60-70C) just when watching videos online (1080p) or with Skype after I upgraded my video card and processor. Idle was around 47-50°C. From what I've been able to gather these are pretty hot temps for a northbridge. It seemed like the stock heatsink wasn't doing the trick even after I replaced the stock TIM with Arctic Silver 5 paste. I found a bigger heatsink with a fan, but the downside to my motherboard is that it uses clips instead of the pushpins. Seems that there are few clip style heatsinks sold, and none of the other clip style heatsinks I've found fit on my motherboard due to other components getting in the way. The new heatsink can be attached with clips, but it's somewhat loose. It does bump my temperatures down slightly compared to the stock heatsink right after I have made sure it's seated correctly, but since it is top-heavy, it tends to move a little and becomes slightly unseated. That results in temperatures even worse than the stock heatsink.

Now I'm at the point of considering some kind of adhesive to secure this heatsink down better. I've seen two main options:

1. Put a small amount of superglue at the corners of the chipset, with thermal paste on the rest.
2. Go with an epoxy for a very permanent seat.

I'm worried about using an adhesive, but later finding out it moved slightly during the process resulting being seated improperly, but not being able to fix it. It sounds like the superglue method isn't quite a permanent as you should be able to carefully removed the heatsink if needed, but it kind of sounds like a Mickey Mouse set up that's asking for trouble down the line too. Any advice on how best to make a heatsink like this stay put while also making sure it's seated correctly?

The other things bothering me is that the stock heatsink seemed warm just for idle temperatures. Unfortunately being a novice I never thought of checking temperatures before I upgraded everything, so I don't know what this northbridge ran at prior. However, other folks have been getting similar temperatures as me, but they were overclocking, while I'm not. Is there anything else I should take a look at that may be raising the northbridge temps due to any of the components installed (RAM, CPU, GPU)?

If there's any other information you might need that might be helpful in figuring this out just let me know.


Why not ask adhesive experts? give these guys a call http://www.hstm.com
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a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2013 11:35:16 AM

I have a cooler similar to that on my x38 board.
you need some 4-40 nuts,bolts,nylon washers,small steel washers and some lockwashers to attach it .
the nylon washers go in between anything metal and the mobo.
starting from the bottom of board:bolt-steel washer-nylon washer-motherboard-nylon washer-steel washer-lockwasher-nut.
2 of those..then you use 1 nut+ lockwasher on top and tighten evenly.
oo..i forgot I made a backplate, too;mayhaps not necessary.
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a c 88 K Overclocking
August 7, 2013 12:08:17 PM

schmuckley said:
I have a cooler similar to that on my x38 board.
you need some 4-40 nuts,bolts,nylon washers,small steel washers and some lockwashers to attach it .
the nylon washers go in between anything metal and the mobo.
starting from the bottom of board:bolt-steel washer-nylon washer-motherboard-nylon washer-steel washer-lockwasher-nut.
2 of those..then you use 1 nut+ lockwasher on top and tighten evenly.
oo..i forgot I made a backplate, too;mayhaps not necessary.

no through-holes in his motherboard (other than the uATX mounts) bolts wouldn't work
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a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2013 3:22:02 PM

No through-holes? Okay..If not through-holes.
Here's the stuff: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
2-part epoxy ..mix with a toothpick on cardboard.
Hope you get the mount right the 1st-time.
Just a pea-drop on chip and smoosh down and hold.
You won't need much.
Is there any way to rig up zip-ties? :D 
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September 3, 2013 12:12:49 PM

Bruce Ungersbock said:
kingofaces said:
First I will point out that I am not doing any overclocking on my computer yet, but I figured you folks would have the most experience with this topic. I recently upgraded my computer from stock components to 16GB RAM, 3.4 Ghz AMD Phenom II X4 965 processor, and a XFX Radeon HD 6670 video card. I haven't changed any other settings in the BIOS either, so the only change made to the system were with those hardware upgrades.

Then I basically had a northbridge that was getting pretty warm (60-70C) just when watching videos online (1080p) or with Skype after I upgraded my video card and processor. Idle was around 47-50°C. From what I've been able to gather these are pretty hot temps for a northbridge. It seemed like the stock heatsink wasn't doing the trick even after I replaced the stock TIM with Arctic Silver 5 paste. I found a bigger heatsink with a fan, but the downside to my motherboard is that it uses clips instead of the pushpins. Seems that there are few clip style heatsinks sold, and none of the other clip style heatsinks I've found fit on my motherboard due to other components getting in the way. The new heatsink can be attached with clips, but it's somewhat loose. It does bump my temperatures down slightly compared to the stock heatsink right after I have made sure it's seated correctly, but since it is top-heavy, it tends to move a little and becomes slightly unseated. That results in temperatures even worse than the stock heatsink.

Now I'm at the point of considering some kind of adhesive to secure this heatsink down better. I've seen two main options:

1. Put a small amount of superglue at the corners of the chipset, with thermal paste on the rest.
2. Go with an epoxy for a very permanent seat.

I'm worried about using an adhesive, but later finding out it moved slightly during the process resulting being seated improperly, but not being able to fix it. It sounds like the superglue method isn't quite a permanent as you should be able to carefully removed the heatsink if needed, but it kind of sounds like a Mickey Mouse set up that's asking for trouble down the line too. Any advice on how best to make a heatsink like this stay put while also making sure it's seated correctly?

The other things bothering me is that the stock heatsink seemed warm just for idle temperatures. Unfortunately being a novice I never thought of checking temperatures before I upgraded everything, so I don't know what this northbridge ran at prior. However, other folks have been getting similar temperatures as me, but they were overclocking, while I'm not. Is there anything else I should take a look at that may be raising the northbridge temps due to any of the components installed (RAM, CPU, GPU)?

If there's any other information you might need that might be helpful in figuring this out just let me know.


Why not ask adhesive experts? give these guys a call http://www.hstm.com


I have the same graphics card chipset/AMD proc (Deneb, I think) on a Foxconn board with an 880G NB. NB Idle temp is 51C. The stock HS is a weird shape--rectanguloid and curved on top. I'm thinking of some sort of "orb" HS/Fan and AS adhesive. It may be best to use a bracket fan, instead. An old Big Typhoon is on--it now helps keep the CPU in the mid 30sC, very quietly too--it doesn't help the NB at all. Getting a bracket fan by the Typhoon may prove difficult. I don't wish to remove the stock HS--yet, I might.

I wish that I might simply "clip on" a 40mm or 60mm fan to that, or something in that vein--maybe attaching that to something nearby--somehow use friction instead of adhesive and a different HS/fan. I'm willing also to use adhesive, though: Somehow, I wish to get a decent fan onto the stock HS. It seems to me that such a fan would need some sort of special bracket for direct attachment....

It seems to me that AS Adhesive is similar to superglue or epoxy--according to AS, it transfers heat, though. I'm not going to use superglue/epoxy.

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