Article Request: Best Workstation CPU

Just wondering why there are regular best gaming CPU articles but not workstation CPU's? I'm not the biggest tech nut but i do understand that gaming is more about your graphics card than your CPU and so the gaming CPU articles are not so helpful when you are building a workstation with audio and video encoding in mind. Couldn't find a contact to ask so thought i would put a request here.
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More about article request workstation
  1. You'd probably be better off putting this in the requests section, down at the bottom of the main forum in the tom's hardware section.
  2. without treading into Xeon/Opterons territory, either the Intel I7 980X or the AMD X6 1090T will be one of the best CPU's to put into a workstation. (for audio/video encoding)
  3. Saw this on the front page and wanted to let you know that I have a story comparing the Xeon 5500s to the Xeon 5600s in the works, Meta. Stay tuned. Might be a couple more weeks before it's done.

    Best,
    Chris Angelini
  4. Lmeow said:
    You'd probably be better off putting this in the requests section, down at the bottom of the main forum in the tom's hardware section.


    ok will do
  5. arterius2 said:
    without treading into Xeon/Opterons territory, either the Intel I7 980X or the AMD X6 1090T will be one of the best CPU's to put into a workstation. (for audio/video encoding)



    I'm sure as they are the most expensive :??: but would like to see an article with best in price range like the gaming articles.
  6. There is not that big of a difference anymore between desktop/workstation rigs. Asus AMD desktop motherboards even work with ECC RAMs.

    In fact, because of the difficulties associated with the NUMA arch, these days a multi-core in a single socket can pack quite a wallop in memory intensive applications when compared to a 2p system with multiple DIMM banks.

    Years ago (LOL-it hasn't been that long) workstation cards required extended AGP-Pro slots with supplemental molex power connections. Not any more.

    Motherboards with multiple PCIe Gen2 x16 slots are $100. Motherboards with quad PCIe Gen2 x16 slots are less than $150.

    SATA 6Gb/s with RAID and USB3? Check.
    Multiple 1394a and eSATA? Check.
    Dual GLAN? (you get the point :D )
  7. Quote:
    Depends on what kind of workstation your talking about.

    Workstation could mean anything from using word documents to typing letters to Autocad or Video editing.



    mainly video and audio editing.
  8. Wisecracker said:
    There is not that big of a difference anymore between desktop/workstation rigs. Asus AMD desktop motherboards even work with ECC RAMs.

    In fact, because of the difficulties associated with the NUMA arch, these days a multi-core in a single socket can pack quite a wallop in memory intensive applications when compared to a 2p system with multiple DIMM banks.

    Years ago (LOL-it hasn't been that long) workstation cards required extended AGP-Pro slots with supplemental molex power connections. Not any more.

    Motherboards with multiple PCIe Gen2 x16 slots are $100. Motherboards with quad PCIe Gen2 x16 slots are less than $150.

    SATA 6Gb/s with RAID and USB3? Check.
    Multiple 1394a and eSATA? Check.
    Dual GLAN? (you get the point :D )



    well an article for best desktop/workstation would be great
  9. Yes article for desktop/workstation would be great . . . . . .
  10. well depends on quantum of load. For single socket the intel xeon 3680. For dual socket intel w5680
  11. Quote:
    Depends on what kind of workstation your talking about.

    Workstation could mean anything from using word documents to typing letters to Autocad or Video editing.

    Imo, I usually consider a "workstation" to be a PC that's using a 2P (or more) with a more than normal amount of RAM that will be running Maya, Inventor,etc.
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