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3570K temp variations

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January 15, 2013 2:15:31 AM

Just wondering guys, (I'm a new convert from AMD 6300 to the 3570K as of 2 days ago) and I'm wondering...right now I'm using a 212 evo with 2 SP120 HP edition fans... and wanting to know ...with a budget board (MSI Z77A-G41) am i going to have to expect a huge difference in voltage and temps required to get a 4.5 stable compared to a 4.4? because I've achieved 4.4 quite manageably, but 4.5 seems much harder...unless I'm doing something wrong. I still realyly dont much know what I'm doing as far as all these Disable Bit/overspeed protection/overvoltage options...if there's a good guide somewhere that someone could recommend or some of you have an answer for me..def appreciate it.
clint

PM is ok too if that's easier.

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a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2013 12:53:10 PM

Each chip is different. Some people hit 4.4 with ease while some have to start popping voltage like mad just to pass 4.2Ghz on the 3570k. If you hit 4.4 with ease and 4.5 is taking a dump of voltage, then you've found your wall. Remember the processors work like this. The further you go with the frequency, the more voltage will be required. The "Wall" as people call it is where the processor is really going to need big jumps of voltage to get to the next stop. If you're not wanting to pump a lot more voltage into it, then you may have found your sweet spot at 4.4Ghz
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a b K Overclocking
January 23, 2013 2:26:20 PM

No you shouldn't see any major differences between a high quality board and a budget board. Maybe 1Mhz, if that. 4.4Ghz isn't too bad though. I've got mine up to 4.8Ghz but it took 1.43v. Right now I have mine a 4.7Ghz with 1.396vcore. So it does take a lot of volts to get higher than 4.4. When I had mine clocked at 4.5Ghz my voltage was 1.32 but it would have still been stable at 1.3v. I like to run my PC at just a little higher voltage than it is stable to make sure it's really stable. I hope this helps you compare your chip to another chip to see about where you need to be.
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January 24, 2013 3:58:18 AM

Best answer selected by clintwilks.
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