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Is future proofing your socket important?

Last response: in CPUs
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Is it better to go with AM3 because 1156 is dead?

Total: 33 votes (6 blank votes)

  • Yes
  • 60 %
  • No
  • 41 %
May 22, 2010 6:45:58 PM

I just want to get a feel for what people really think is the right choice by means of a poll. Any comments about this topic are greatly appreciated.
a c 83 à CPUs
May 22, 2010 9:48:07 PM

Bulldozer is rumored AM3+ with backwards compatibility with AM3, however it's not known what features you will loose by using it on AM3 or which motherboards will be compatible with it. I personally buy for what is here now based on price/performance.
a b à CPUs
May 22, 2010 9:51:41 PM

1156 was dead the day it came out, but the irresistable thing about it is the i5 dual core series, which although is priced insanely high, is quite easy to cool and power
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a b à CPUs
May 22, 2010 10:42:54 PM

The its dead line is a fan boy catch phrase.
So Intel is going to have new hardware in 2011 ? If that hardware appeals to you, you upgrade ? You sell your m/b~cpu, just like you would, just your cpu. Most people upgrade both together.
For AMD was 790 dead, when they introduced 890 ? I've heard the Bulldozer might not be all AM3, but 890XX AM3, its not here yet , who knows ?

Last time I checked if you want a new chipset, you buy a new m/b, even with AMD ,lol
May 22, 2010 11:01:49 PM

I think it's pretty safe to say that "future proofing" is an AMD exclusive feature. I dare saying that if you are an Intel fan, don't bother. You just can't future proof it. I bought a 1156 board myself and I never belived I had a chance of a significant upgrade with it so I just knew from the start that it'll be the exact same system until I change it completely (hopefully in like 3 years since I'm don't care much about high end).
May 22, 2010 11:41:54 PM

Considering how AMD was able to put a 6 core CPU on a old socket yeah I think AM3 will last longer.
a b à CPUs
May 22, 2010 11:52:13 PM

go with what you want to do and give up the notion of "future proofing".

if a core i5 (for example) will suit your purposes more than a Phenom II (for example) then get the i5 - it will last you a while, especially if you get the 750.

if you're one of these people who has the desire and/or funds to upgrade every year then it's hardly an issue anyway.

yes, AMD have an intentional track record of extending the life of their platforms, which is why AMD will always win out in terms of value, but if Intel suits your purposes better then just go with it.
May 24, 2010 11:32:35 PM

LePhuronn said:
go with what you want to do and give up the notion of "future proofing".

if a core i5 (for example) will suit your purposes more than a Phenom II (for example) then get the i5 - it will last you a while, especially if you get the 750.

if you're one of these people who has the desire and/or funds to upgrade every year then it's hardly an issue anyway.

yes, AMD have an intentional track record of extending the life of their platforms, which is why AMD will always win out in terms of value, but if Intel suits your purposes better then just go with it.


What if I'm looking to upgrade my system periodically. Some parts this year, others next year? Is there a way to stagger purchases so that a new motherboard purchase isn't always accompanied by a new processor purchase and vice versa or is it always going to be a pairing?
a c 131 à CPUs
May 25, 2010 5:29:36 AM

Slayer697 said:
What if I'm looking to upgrade my system periodically. Some parts this year, others next year? Is there a way to stagger purchases so that a new motherboard purchase isn't always accompanied by a new processor purchase and vice versa or is it always going to be a pairing?

Well, you might have to plan it out but don't be expecting to pay an equal amount every time. The GPU can be upgraded no problem. If you go with a lower end CPU now, then upgrading to a higher end one (high end today) could be an option. But at some point you will always find that you need to upgrade your system. Think about it; older chipsets don't support the new Athlon II or Phenom II, even if the socket does. At this point you'll be looking to spend on the CPU, motherboard and RAM.
Of course, you could simply do it all over again, purchase lower end parts then upgrade down the road.
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