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I7 - 2700k OC @4.5Ghz Help!

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January 18, 2013 2:21:11 AM

I am just finishing my build, and want to overclock my 2700k to 4.5ghz.

Specs:

Cpu: i7 - 2700k
Mobo: MSI Z77 MPOWER
Gpu: Asus GTX670
Ram: Corsair Vengeance 16GB 2x8GB
Cooler: Corsair H100i

I would like to know what settings i need to change to get a stable overclock at 4.5Ghz. Also any moneriting programs and tips are much appreciated, as this is my first over clock. Thanks

More about : 2700k 5ghz

a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 3:33:19 PM

First download realtemp to check cpu temps and prime95 for seeing if its stable.
h100i is plenty for 4.5Ghz

first change multiplier from 35 to 45. then change cpu voltage to 1.300 and then disable Intel Turbo Boost. simple. now do into windows and run realtemp and prime95 for 1hour (just to be safe) if temps are over 80C then reduce multiplier to 43 and voltage to 1.290

If its still over 80C go another step down. but ur cpu shouldn't hit very high temps with the h100i.
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January 19, 2013 3:54:57 PM

timarp000 said:
First download realtemp to check cpu temps and prime95 for seeing if its stable.
h100i is plenty for 4.5Ghz

first change multiplier from 35 to 45. then change cpu voltage to 1.300 and then disable Intel Turbo Boost. simple. now do into windows and run realtemp and prime95 for 1hour (just to be safe) if temps are over 80C then reduce multiplier to 43 and voltage to 1.290

If its still over 80C go another step down. but ur cpu shouldn't hit very high temps with the h100i.


So i dont have to change anything like the v-droop and confusing stuff like that? Also i heard something about offset voltage???
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:21:56 PM

naah u dont have to mess with those stuff.

i miss typed run prime95 for atleast 2 hours. and if the comp hangs when running prime95 either decrease multiplier or increase voltage. if your temps arent high increase voltage but if your temps are high the decrease both the multiplier and voltage.
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:30:36 PM

H100i!!!!!!!! crank up your vcore to 1.4v turn up the mulitplier to 50, enable PLL at 1.8v. If its stable try lowering the vcore to 1.39, and if thats stable after prime95 try 1.385.

H100i + 2700k is a recipe for the big 5.0Ghz
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January 19, 2013 4:33:51 PM

redeemer said:
H100i!!!!!!!! crank up your vcore to 1.4v turn up the mulitplier to 50, enable PLL at 1.8v. If its stable try lowering the vcore to 1.39, and if thats stable after prime95 try 1.385.

H100i + 2700k is a recipe for the big 5.0Ghz


id like to keep the processor for 2+ years thanks.

What is pll tho?
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:35:26 PM

My i5 2500k at 1.39v cooled by my H100 hits 73c after hours of prime95 Large FFT, just make sure your LLC is set to extreme so your vcore doesn't flactuate.

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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:37:44 PM

hiporc said:
id like to keep the processor for 2+ years thanks.

What is pll tho?



You will be fine dude 1.52v is the max, 5.0Ghz @ 1.4v with an H100i is perfectly ok for 24/7 use. The whole point of your 2700k is to hit 5.0Ghz with lots of vcore, its a binned chip!
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a c 105 K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:41:33 PM

1.4v can cause early CPU failure due to electromigration. It is NOT safe to tell someone to just go for 5Ghz and not even mention safe temps! Very irresponsible post, dangerous even. 1.4v and up needs a custom water loop not a closed loop cooler.

Every chip is different. Meaning anyone telling you to do this exactly or that exactly does not understand fundamentals.

There are very good guides online including in these forums. I suggest you spend a few days reading and actually understanding what you are about to try to do before attempting it.
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:42:08 PM

PLL is overvoltage only need to high clocks, helps with stability. My CPU has been running a long time, with no problems. As long as you got proper cooling vcore shouldnt matter.
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:43:45 PM

anort3 said:
1.4v can cause early CPU failure due to electromigration. It is NOT safe to tell someone to just go for 5Ghz and not even mention safe temps! Very irresponsible post, dangerous even. 1.4v and up needs a custom water loop not a closed loop cooler.

Every chip is different. Meaning anyone telling you to do this exactly or that exactly does not understand fundamentals.

There are very good guides online including in these forums. I suggest you spend a few days reading and actually understanding what you are about to try to do before attempting it.



1.4v is perfectly fine for Sandy Bridge, max stated by Intel is 1.52v. The lower the better of course I suggest to do some research about overclocking with Sandy Bridge then comeback!
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:47:49 PM

Dont go higher than 1.35!
when that much cash is on the line why risk it?
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a c 105 K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:49:05 PM

The testers here at Tom's own labs found 1.4v kills Sandy Bridge chips in as little as a matter of months due to electromigration without proper cooling. Voltage is a measure of force.
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a c 105 K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:51:20 PM

Oh and I bought Sandy Bridge the week it was released in January 2011 and have been overclocking since. I'm pretty much up on my research thanks...... :sarcastic: 
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:54:18 PM

timarp000 said:
Dont go higher than 1.35!
when that much cash is on the line why risk it?



I am suprised that there are not more informed individuals, I say again as long as temps are fine 1.4v is perfectly safe. This is Sandy Bridge were talking about here not Ivy, you guys realise that a cpu even degrades at stock voltage!
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:56:01 PM

anort3 said:
Oh and I bought Sandy Bridge the week it was released in January 2011 and have been overclocking since. I'm pretty much up on my research thanks...... :sarcastic: 



well juding by your own clocks I would say your amature at best
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a c 105 K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 4:58:45 PM

redeemer said:
well juding by your own clocks I would say your amature at best



Or just not stupid. Learn physics.


http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/automatic-overclock...

" Our overclocking articles often mention a process called “electromigration,” where material is physically transferred from one part of a circuit to another. While the full description of this phenomenon is complex, it’s easy to understand that an insulator contaminated with conductive particles no longer insulates. Transistor gates function as either insulators or conductors depending on charge state and are particularly prone to this type of damage. And yet, many technology enthusiasts place the blame for a fried processor or GPU solely on heat, ignoring the fact that voltage is a measure of force.

Force causes electromigration, and colder silicon more easily resists that force by being less pliable. Colder temperatures also increase the insulation capabilities of transistor gates in the “off” phase, reducing the number of electrons that are forced through the closed gate. The problem with blaming heat alone on a failure is that moderate increases in electromigration resistance usually require drastic temperature reductions. When it comes to protecting hundreds of dollars in equipment, we always make our recommendations to you erring on the side of caution.

We've learned through trial, error, and dead processors that voltage levels beyond 1.45 V at above-ambient temperatures can kill an Intel CPU etched at 32 nm (Sandy Bridge-based parts included) very quickly. Those same processors die a fairly slow death at voltage levels between 1.40 V and 1.45 V (somewhere between weeks and months on our test benches). And we're expecting more than a year of reliable service from the parts we've dutifully kept below 1.40 V. Not all motherboards are perfect however. Voltage instability on a particularly cheap motherboard fried one of our processors when it was set to only1.38 V. Subsequently, you've seen us use 1.35 V for the overclocking tests in older motherboard round-ups, embracing 1.38 V to 1.40 V in more recent pieces covering higher-end platforms."
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January 19, 2013 4:58:52 PM

k, hold up... I am just going to stick with 4.5.
will i need to change pll? what exactly does pll do?
Also what is llc, and will i need to change it?
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:01:26 PM

You do not need PLL for 4.5ghz just turn up your vcore to 1.26v for starters and turn up your multiplier to 45.
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January 19, 2013 5:04:28 PM

but what does pll do?
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:05:15 PM

k, stick with 4.5.

Change multiplier to 45
change voltage to 1.300
disable Intel Turbo

run prime 95 and realtemp for 2hrs. if its unstable increase voltage to 1.310 and do it again. keep doing this process untill cpu is stable. dont go above 1.350v.
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January 19, 2013 5:05:48 PM

k thank you
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:07:11 PM

hiporc said:
k thank you

No problem dude...
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January 19, 2013 5:07:49 PM

say, if it is stable at a low voltage, and i want to try something at more like 4.7Ghz... would i need to change any other settings?
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:09:12 PM

anort3 said:
Or just not stupid. Learn physics.


http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/automatic-overclock...

" Our overclocking articles often mention a process called “electromigration,” where material is physically transferred from one part of a circuit to another. While the full description of this phenomenon is complex, it’s easy to understand that an insulator contaminated with conductive particles no longer insulates. Transistor gates function as either insulators or conductors depending on charge state and are particularly prone to this type of damage. And yet, many technology enthusiasts place the blame for a fried processor or GPU solely on heat, ignoring the fact that voltage is a measure of force.

Force causes electromigration, and colder silicon more easily resists that force by being less pliable. Colder temperatures also increase the insulation capabilities of transistor gates in the “off” phase, reducing the number of electrons that are forced through the closed gate. The problem with blaming heat alone on a failure is that moderate increases in electromigration resistance usually require drastic temperature reductions. When it comes to protecting hundreds of dollars in equipment, we always make our recommendations to you erring on the side of caution.

We've learned through trial, error, and dead processors that voltage levels beyond 1.45 V at above-ambient temperatures can kill an Intel CPU etched at 32 nm (Sandy Bridge-based parts included) very quickly. Those same processors die a fairly slow death at voltage levels between 1.40 V and 1.45 V (somewhere between weeks and months on our test benches). And we're expecting more than a year of reliable service from the parts we've dutifully kept below 1.40 V. Not all motherboards are perfect however. Voltage instability on a particularly cheap motherboard fried one of our processors when it was set to only1.38 V. Subsequently, you've seen us use 1.35 V for the overclocking tests in older motherboard round-ups, embracing 1.38 V to 1.40 V in more recent pieces covering higher-end platforms."



That is the biggest bunch of bull i have ever seen, 1.4v is safe for Sandy Bridge electromigration happens all the time even at stock VID. Temps is what you have to worry about, Intel has stated that MAX VID for Sandy is 1.52v so 1.4v is perfectly exceptable with good cooling. Myself and millions of others have been using 1.4v for the longest time since the intro of Sandy K processor with no signs of electromigration.

You would not use a cheap motherboard for aggressive overclocking anyway. So many individuals fold 24/7 at high clocks for years! Pulling up a Toms article on overclocking does not mean squat tbh
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:10:13 PM

hiporc said:
say, if it is stable at a low voltage, and i want to try something at more like 4.7Ghz... would i need to change any other settings?



only multiplier and vcore
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a b K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:21:12 PM

Well you basically do it like this it might be a little different.First off Download CPU-Z - Realtemp -Prime95 - just like any overclocking you will need to enter the bios. Depending on your motherboard I always recommend going to the Save/Exit section and select restore to Defaults just in case some settings were changed if you were adjusting things so we can start fresh.






Main BIOS Screen:


Save/Exit


One thing that I always recommend is disabling all the things you are not using such as eSata, USB 3.0 etc. After that depending on your motherboard you should have an Overclocking section so we need to go here next.


First go ahead and set your CPU Multiplier between 40 and 45. Since the Baseclock on most P67 motherboards should be 100mhz, 100mhz x 40=4ghz etc. This is the option that we will use because Sandy Bridge is very testy when it comes to adjusting the Baseclock.


Next go to VDroop and change this to without Vdroop. This will basically help reduce sagging while we run Prime95 or Linx and keep the voltage stable.


Next go to Internal PLL Voltage Override and set this to Enable- This is a very important step whenever you are using a multiplier of 40 and greater.


Next go to CPU VCore and set this to manual and then I would recommend starting at 1.300V for 4ghz and if you want 4.5 you will more than likely need about 1.325 but always remember to test in small increments in order to achieve a nice stable overclock. This may vary on your CPU whether or not you have the same identical one as someone else.


Next head over to the memory section of your BIOS and set the DIMM voltage to whatever the manufacturers specifications.


Now we need to configure some other very important features in our Bios which some are completely optional but I would highly recommend changing them for stability.


First go to EIST (Intel Speedstep Technology)and disable this feature. Basically this allows your CPU to throttle down below even the stock 3.4ghz when tasks are at a minimum so it is optional but I always disable it.


Next got to C1E Support and disable this feature. This is another power saving feature but enabling this might cause instability.


Next go to CPU C3 Support and set this to disable. I believe this is also called Sleep where the processor does not need to keep its cache coherent but maintains another state.


Next make sure you have Turbo Mode enabled. Most P67 -Z68 motherboards have this feature.



Next up, memory settings! Make sure to configure this per your memory specifications, or use the XMP function to use the built in SPD settings (if applicable)


Now you can go ahead and Save/Exit to Windows. I would definitely recommend having some Temperature software previsously installed on your system. I swear by Coretemp but there are many others out there. Make sure you keep a close eye on your temps after booting into windows.


Now that you are in windows check you clock settings with CPUZ and I recommend running a stability test such as Prime95. Another great one is LinX which is very intense. You can run it as long as you want and there are many different opinions as to how long you should run the tests to do some research online and make your decision.I usually run LinuX for two hours and then i run prime 95 for twelve hours so far those are what work best for me they might not for you.


That is basically it.
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a c 145 K Overclocking
January 19, 2013 5:29:26 PM

Used these guides to get Son No. 3's box set up (2600k) ..... have saved BIOS profiles for stock, 4.0, 4.2, 4.4, 4.6 and 4.8 Ghz so far. I spent about 3.5 hours setting up each profile.... 5 minutes in BIOS and then a 30 minute run. I have him run torture tests at night after he's done playing....all passed so I'm sure further tweaking is possible.

These profiles are all set up so that the system is not overclocked 24/7..... it responds to load and only ramps up when needed so as to to extend system life. Voltages go below 1.0 when processor is not being worked hard and temps using typical everyday programs are in low 30s. I don't see the logic in being locked at 4.x GHz or firing 1.4 volts thru the thing 24/7 when ya reading THG Forums.

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=26...
http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...

It's my 16 year old son's box so all settings are very conservative. Hope this helps.

4.6 Ghz - Everyday Profile

Per core multiplier = 46
Load Line Calibration = High
VRM Frequency Mode = manual
VRM Fixed Freq. Mode = 350
Phase Control = Extreme
Duty Control = Extreme
CPU Voltage Control = Offset
Offset Mode Sign = +
Offset Mode Voltage = 0.050
CPU Spread Spectrum = Disabled
Intel Speed Step = Enabled

CPU ratio = Auto
Hyperthreading = Enabled
CPU C1 Report = Enabled
CPU C3 Report = Enabled
CPU C6 Report = Enabled
Intel Virtual tech = Disabled

Vcore ranges from 1.31 to 1.34
Core Temps are 59, 63, 64, 59 under full torture test (OCCT, Linpack, Prime 95) loading

4.8 Ghz - Gaming Profile
HT useless here so I turned it off

Per core multiplier = 46
Load Line Calibration = High
VRM Frequency Mode = manual
VRM Fixed Freq. Mode 350
Phase Control = Extreme
Duty Control = Extreme
CPU Voltage Control = Offset
Offset Mode Sign = +
Offset Mode Voltage = 0.060
CPU Spread Spectrum = Disabled
Intel Speed Step = Enabled

CPU ratio = Auto
Hyperthreading = Disabled
CPU C1 Report = Enabled
CPU C3 Report = Enabled
CPU C6 Report = Enabled
Intel Virtual tech = Disabled

Vcore ranges from 1.38 to 1.39
Core Temps are 60, 64, 65, 62 under full torture test loading

We had a 5.0 Ghz profile under the old MoBo

Upon boot, if ya wanna change profiles you simply enter BIOS and tell it which profile to load....1 click switch.

Cooler is Thermalright Silver Arrow which is generally about 1/4 warmer than the H100 but much quieter.

I just replaced the MoBo (P8P67 WS Revolution) under an RMA which suddenly stopped recognizing the SSD and GFX card..... haven't had time to try and push it any higher. Danged kid got too many games for Xmas and I cant get any time on the thing :) 

BTW, I use OCCT to do my 30 minute testing (no need for additional temperature and voltage monitors), memtest86+ for memory and prime 95 for final stability test.
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January 19, 2013 7:07:11 PM

0.0!

It went from turning off turbo boost, increasing the multiplier and setting vcore voltage. To changing every single setting...

I dont constantly be stressing it when im not rendering video...

also bigcyco, you have helped me alot in the past, i was wondering if you could help me again by explaining each of those settings in more detail please :) 

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January 20, 2013 3:52:09 AM

Who ever explains all the different settings to me in detail of what they do.etc gets the best answer medal :) 
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January 23, 2013 3:21:26 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Used these guides to get Son No. 3's box set up (2600k) ..... have saved BIOS profiles for stock, 4.0, 4.2, 4.4, 4.6 and 4.8 Ghz so far. I spent about 3.5 hours setting up each profile.... 5 minutes in BIOS and then a 30 minute run. I have him run torture tests at night after he's done playing....all passed so I'm sure further tweaking is possible.

These profiles are all set up so that the system is not overclocked 24/7..... it responds to load and only ramps up when needed so as to to extend system life. Voltages go below 1.0 when processor is not being worked hard and temps using typical everyday programs are in low 30s. I don't see the logic in being locked at 4.x GHz or firing 1.4 volts thru the thing 24/7 when ya reading THG Forums.

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=26...
http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...

It's my 16 year old son's box so all settings are very conservative. Hope this helps.

4.6 Ghz - Everyday Profile

Per core multiplier = 46
Load Line Calibration = High
VRM Frequency Mode = manual
VRM Fixed Freq. Mode = 350
Phase Control = Extreme
Duty Control = Extreme
CPU Voltage Control = Offset
Offset Mode Sign = +
Offset Mode Voltage = 0.050
CPU Spread Spectrum = Disabled
Intel Speed Step = Enabled

CPU ratio = Auto
Hyperthreading = Enabled
CPU C1 Report = Enabled
CPU C3 Report = Enabled
CPU C6 Report = Enabled
Intel Virtual tech = Disabled

Vcore ranges from 1.31 to 1.34
Core Temps are 59, 63, 64, 59 under full torture test (OCCT, Linpack, Prime 95) loading

4.8 Ghz - Gaming Profile
HT useless here so I turned it off

Per core multiplier = 46
Load Line Calibration = High
VRM Frequency Mode = manual
VRM Fixed Freq. Mode 350
Phase Control = Extreme
Duty Control = Extreme
CPU Voltage Control = Offset
Offset Mode Sign = +
Offset Mode Voltage = 0.060
CPU Spread Spectrum = Disabled
Intel Speed Step = Enabled

CPU ratio = Auto
Hyperthreading = Disabled
CPU C1 Report = Enabled
CPU C3 Report = Enabled
CPU C6 Report = Enabled
Intel Virtual tech = Disabled

Vcore ranges from 1.38 to 1.39
Core Temps are 60, 64, 65, 62 under full torture test loading

We had a 5.0 Ghz profile under the old MoBo

Upon boot, if ya wanna change profiles you simply enter BIOS and tell it which profile to load....1 click switch.

Cooler is Thermalright Silver Arrow which is generally about 1/4 warmer than the H100 but much quieter.

I just replaced the MoBo (P8P67 WS Revolution) under an RMA which suddenly stopped recognizing the SSD and GFX card..... haven't had time to try and push it any higher. Danged kid got too many games for Xmas and I cant get any time on the thing :) 

BTW, I use OCCT to do my 30 minute testing (no need for additional temperature and voltage monitors), memtest86+ for memory and prime 95 for final stability test.


I will give you the best answer if you can explain:

LLC:
Phase Control:
Duty Control:
Speed Step:
Vrm frequencies:

also do i disable intel turbo boost?

i really just want a answer so i have an idea on what exactly i am doing to my pc when i overclock it.
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a c 105 K Overclocking
January 23, 2013 5:18:41 PM

Google these things. You should understand what you are doing before you do it anyway. Also you need to understand no two systems are identical. What works on one may very well not work on another due to microscopic differences in CPUs with the same name. Thus even two "identical" 2700K chips may very well overclock differently.

And honestly overclocking is not for everyone. Personally I would say if you can't be bothered to at least learn what settings you are changing you have no business overclocking.
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January 24, 2013 12:33:19 AM

I agree with anort3. It's highly recommended you understand what you're doing with all those settings. A little reading goes a long way.

As far as longevity, my rig runs my 2500K at 4.5GHz 24/7 with an H50. It's never off, as it hosts a Minecraft server, along with other things. It's been running strong for at least a year and a half, no hitches. :) 
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