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Solder wont melt

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November 17, 2010 5:35:44 AM

hi there
i want to replace capacitors on motherboard for megaforce touchscreen, but the solder does not want to melt no matter how long I try. Any suggestions?
Thanks

More about : solder wont melt

a b V Motherboard
November 17, 2010 6:56:18 AM

What wattage of soldering iron do you use? I'm guessing that manufacturers using high wattage (very hot) with needle like tip to concentrate the heat better.

Careful though, too long on the soldering can damage other parts due to excessive heat build up.
a c 81 V Motherboard
November 17, 2010 7:23:30 AM

It's a touch screen? you need to use the dry solder iron to get the solder off, it's not the normal everyday solder iron that we use, it's more like a vacuum cleaner bulky and blows out a very hot stream of air to solder and de-solder stuff.
You everyday soldering iron is not going to work on it and will damage the component next to it or under it.... within seconds...I think it's called Hot Gun......
Heres what it looks like...
http://gsmserver.com/shop/equipment/soldering_sssembly/...
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a b V Motherboard
November 17, 2010 6:07:12 PM

As stated manufacturing solder is not the same as what you get from radio shack, it melts at a higher temp. Use a high watt iron that is fully heated then melt some solder on the tip and let that get hot a sec. you can then stick the ball of melted solder over what you are trying to de-solder. the melted solder gives a higher contact area than just touching one spot on the iron (similar to tinning wires before making a joint). the goal is to get the iron as hot as possible with the greatest area of contact possible while staying on the joint. If you do not, you will have the iron on it to long and damage the board itself or a nearby component. Just to be thorough, while you are heating the joint you should be pulling out from the other side with a pair of needle nose pliers
a b V Motherboard
November 17, 2010 6:11:15 PM

damasvara said:
I'm guessing that manufacturers using high wattage (very hot) with needle like tip to concentrate the heat better.


To the best of my knowledge most manufacturing uses wave soldering, or some variation thereof
November 16, 2011 6:37:57 AM

Some soldering irons need to heat for a good five minutes before melting anything. Some connections may require more than a few seconds of direct heat to melt. Make sure the tip of the soldering iron is closely and tinned.
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