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Winter/Summer Overclocking

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 23, 2013 11:27:51 AM

I am very new to overclocking. So new, that I bought an ASRock OC Formula MB last month for my i7 3770k just to take all of the guesswork out of doing it. So far, everything is working great. I am usually running at 4.6 GHZ, and my max temps have stayed at a consistent 83 degrees using the Intel Burn Test.

The only thing is, it is usually freezing in my room. Now, by freezing, I don't mean low 10's or anything like that (I live in northern California). But, room temperature probably gets as low as 50 in the mornings. (Freezing for me). What I am wondering is if when the temperatures rise in the summer, if I will have to lower my overclock in order to keep temps down, or will my cooler be able to keep up? (Temps outside get up to 115 in the summer (although a lot cooler in my room most likely :p ), and I am using just a cheap Antec Kuhler 620 water cooler).

What do you guys think?

PS - I woke up a bit ago sweating. I had left my little portable heater running all night and it is now burning up in my room. The entire time, I was running FAH, and the max temps reached were around 84 degrees, which isn't bad. It felt a bit hotter than what summer might feel like in here. But I don't know.
January 24, 2013 6:03:26 PM

Are you mixing your temperatures?
January 24, 2013 6:11:21 PM

I have never gone over 83 on any of the four cores.
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January 25, 2013 11:05:29 AM

83 whats?

That sounds like it's a Celsius temperature, but you describe your room as being 50 degrees, and outside temperatures of 115 - which are clearly Fahrenheit.
January 25, 2013 11:14:29 AM

I'm happy to be corrected, but logically your temps should remain consistent level above ambient. So if your room temps rise, then your internal temps will rise accordingly, and if this takes them too high you should reduce the overclock.

Sorry for double-posting, but I can't edit my posts to add things for some reason.
January 25, 2013 6:51:48 PM

Whoops. Like I said, I am very new to overclocking, and that includes not mixing up fahrenheit and celcius temp reportings. Anyways, thanks for the answer. I just thought that it was neat that a cold room would make up for some cheaper cooling methods. This is probably a stupid question - I know they have temp-regulated rooms for high-end systems, but have you ever heard of keeping a desktop computer in a refrigerator or something like that?
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