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Computer doesnt always start up.

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March 18, 2010 7:28:04 PM

Hello gents

Im having serious trouble starting up my comp those days. It takes up to six or seven tries somtimes before it actually boots up. When running everything seems to be working properly.

Also, usually, when the comp works fine, all 3 keyboard LEDs light up right after power up, when it refuses to start up, all 3 LEDS keep blank. The only way to power cycle it is then to press the power button, or directly the one on the PSU because the reset button wont work.

Heres a list of what I have done so far.

- Swapped RAM cards with others - Same result
- Re-plugged every cable coming out of the PSU - Same result
- Tried to unplug, HDD and DVD drives - Same result.
- Restored BIOS defaults although i made only minor adjustements to it, no overcloaking- same result
- Had the PSU tested in a comp store - It seems to be OK.
- Changed the mobo through warranty - Same result
- Re-seated my video card and removed static electricity, if any - same result

I'm a bit at a loss as to what to try now... Can someone help plz?

Intel E8400
ASUS P5Q Pro
Nvidia GeForce 9800 GTX+
2 gigs of Corsair DDR2 SDRAM
PSU is a Fortron Blue Storm 500W

Thats pretty much it as HDD and ODD's dont seem to be the culprits. No fancy PCI card, onboard AC '97. And yes that PC is grounded.

Thx in advance.

More about : computer doesnt start

a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2010 8:33:52 PM

Either motherboard failure, or PSU failure, but I'm betting on the motherboard. When you have leaky capacitors it can take a few tries before they operate will enough to allow the system to POST. Check to see if you have leaky or bulging capacitors, or if any area of your motherboard looks burned.
March 18, 2010 9:00:19 PM

Thats a good idea! How could I forget to check that out?

Sadly I just checked and neither the mobo, graphic card or PSU seem to have bulging capacitors.
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2010 9:28:45 PM

PSUs age and lose capacity. Its possible your PSU is just not outputting as much power as it used to. Trying a new, preferably more powerful, PSU is really the only way to eliminate that as a problem.

That PSU is an old model and barely has enough amperage for a 9800 GTX+ when its new.
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article212-page1.html

A corsair 450W PSU has more 12V amperage available. I bet its your PSU
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2010 9:29:55 PM

I agree with dndhatcher. Sounds like a PSU issue to me.
March 19, 2010 12:32:18 AM

My bad, it is in fact a Blue Storm II. Anyway, I too tend to think it is PSU related from what I read here and there.

Theres some dust I cant get rid of inside of it, not on fans axis but on components themselves. Couldnt that just be the cause?

Thanks for replies everyone. :) 
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2010 4:57:23 PM

Dust on cooling fins and heatsinks can cause overheating. Overheating can cause flakey problems and eventually damage to components.
March 22, 2010 6:13:25 PM

During one of my numerous reboots the PSU stopped working all together so I had to buy a new one.

Comp is now working. So I can confirm PSU was the cause as you people pointed out.

Cheers!
!