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A New System

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Last response: in CPUs
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May 29, 2010 11:30:22 AM

Hello guys, i have some issues with the setup i will buy:

Coolermaster Storm Sniper Black
Gigabyte Intel X58A-UD5
Intel i7 930
2 x ASUS ATI HD 5850
4 GB RAM
2 x Sony Optiarc AD-7241S (DVD)
LC Power Ozeanos (PSU)
Logitech G15 Gaming KB
Western Digital Caviar GREEN 2TB
Lancool TR-5F (Temperature Display)

Now the first thing is: I want to crossfire the 2 cards and the motherboard is compatible, but on the specs of the card it says this: Form factor: Standard (2 slots width)
Now will i still be able to crossfire with 2 or even 3 cards? the motherboard has 3 pci-e slots, so i thought it should be possible but now im not so sure because of the size...

second problem: i will need alot of power to run 2 or even 3 5850s right? these are the specs of the psu:
Power Supply 650W, 80 Plus, 6x SATA, 2x PCIE, 20+4pin
14cm Fan, Cable Management
so will i be able to power 3 5850s?

third problem: i want to install RAM, ofcourse, but on the specs of the motherboard it says this: max. frequencyDDR3 2200MHz (PC3-17600)
will i be able to install PC-10660 1333 Mhz RAM?

fourth problem: i'm not really a friend of overclocking, or even building a pc, ill have somebody do it for me :p 
so, on the motherboard specs page, i found this: Smart QuickBoost
it says i can overclock with a single click, and i snooped around a bit and i read that people with an i5 processor 4x2.66 had the option to overclock to 3.8 Ghz

ill be greatful for any kind of help, thanks

PS. i put this in the first section (CPU), although it was about alot of components, but i didnt find a section like that, move it if its wrong

More about : system

a b à CPUs
May 29, 2010 1:09:27 PM

I'll answer your second question as a start.
Here is the load on an Intel Core i7 930 CPU
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2010/03/01/intel-...
At stock speeds under load 216 watts at overclocked speeds @ 4.3 Ghz 396 watts.
This is just the CPU.
For 2 Radeon 5850 graphics cards under load about 469 watts
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-5850,2433...
3 Radeon 5850 graphics cards under load would use about 705 watts!

You could try out some power supply calculators
http://educations.newegg.com/tool/psucalc/index.html
or this is more accurate
http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp
http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
or this
http://support.asus.com/PowerSupplyCalculator/PSCalcula...
I think that ASUS PSU calc is a little more accurate though.
but under extreme load and overclocking it will use much more power.
So I don't quite trust these Power Supply Calcs
To be on the safe side for 2 Radeon 5850 graphics cards and if you intend to overclock that Core i7 920 I would get a quality 1 kilowatt power supply but if you don't intend to overclock the CPU I would get something like a 850 watt power supply.Even the hard drives and optical drives use a smaller proportion of electricity.
I would allocate about 25 watts per each drive.Plus consider other components that use lesser power like the motherboard,memory,extra fans,add in cards etc.
A 650 watt PSU just won't cut the muster.Always get a power supply with a higher power wattage rating than the maximum usage you could possibly use under the worst conditions with perhaps an extra 100 or 200 watts to spare
May 29, 2010 1:56:59 PM

hey thanks for the tipp, now i see you're right
i went through the costs of the computer and it exceeds 2500$ without the monitor, so im cutting costs here and there, im thinking of swapping the i7 for a phenom x4 965, the processor and the mobo would be less expensive but it would give me some performance drop (based on the benchmarks i see here on TH)

so back to the psu topic, here are the specs of the other PSU i found
1000W, ATX V2.2, Blue LED, 14cm Fan, SLI, PFC, Low Noise
80Plus, 8x SATA, 4x PCI-E

the problem is, in the specs its only SLI, not CrossfireX, and thats written on all the specs of all PSUs
but it doesnt depend on the PSU to do crossfireX or SLI, right?
or does sli/crossfire really depend on the PSU?

Related resources
a c 131 à CPUs
May 29, 2010 2:01:36 PM

jj463rd said:
I'll answer your second question as a start.
Here is the load on an Intel Core i7 930 CPU
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2010/03/01/intel-...
At stock speeds under load 216 watts at overclocked speeds @ 4.3 Ghz 396 watts.
This is just the CPU.

It clearly states that it is total system power consumption, not just the CPU.
a c 131 à CPUs
May 29, 2010 2:04:57 PM

nobodyshearing said:
the problem is, in the specs its only SLI, not CrossfireX, and thats written on all the specs of all PSUs
but it doesnt depend on the PSU to do crossfireX or SLI, right?
or does sli/crossfire really depend on the PSU?

Don't worry about it. It's like posting "Compatible with hickory brand paper" on a pencil. The doesn't mean you can't draw with equal results on other paper... It's a pencil. It's a power supply If it has enough power, the it will work.
a c 131 à CPUs
May 29, 2010 2:08:14 PM

jj463rd said:

For 2 Radeon 5850 graphics cards under load about 469 watts
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-5850,2433...
3 Radeon 5850 graphics cards under load would use about 705 watts!

Again, that's from the entire system. Although, I have no clue where you got the 705W from.

Not to mention that these readings are also from the wall. Meaning to calculate how much power the system is actually drawing, you would need to take power supply efficiency into account. Most are about 80%-85% efficient.

The 5870 by itself will never draw more than 188W. 188x3=564W. The 5850 is even less.

jj463rd said:
I would allocate about 25 watts per each drive.Plus consider other components that use lesser power like the motherboard,memory,extra fans,add in cards etc.
A 650 watt PSU just won't cut the muster.Always get a power supply with a higher power wattage rating than the maximum usage you could possibly use under the worst conditions with perhaps an extra 100 or 200 watts to spare

Hard drives usually use never more than 10W each. Definitely do leave extra space though, for longevity of the PSU (not maxing it out), if you run the computer on full load 24-7. I'd just tack on 100W more, no more, rather than any more unless you are worried about power efficiency at load. ( I believe power supplies are generally most efficient somewhere around 60-80% load).
May 29, 2010 2:26:37 PM

thanks enzo matrix, then i will choose that power supply, it should be more then enough and isnt much more expensive
can somebody now help me with the first and 4th problem? the other 2 are solved
a c 131 à CPUs
May 29, 2010 3:24:37 PM

nobodyshearing said:
thanks enzo matrix, then i will choose that power supply, it should be more then enough and isnt much more expensive
can somebody now help me with the first and 4th problem? the other 2 are solved

Errr... You didn't ask a question about it. Or state a problem. You just said you found out about it. What do you want to know? It looks to me just like one of those auto overclocking features. They work, but often use more volts than you need. To overclock with better stability and less heat issues, I'd recommend learning to overclock yourself.
May 29, 2010 5:29:15 PM

oh yeah sorry i kinda forgot to post the question
so the question is, is it safe enough to use
you're saying that it uses too many voltage, but does that mean that its less stable or that it produces more heat, or even something else?
a c 131 à CPUs
May 30, 2010 4:09:49 PM

nobodyshearing said:
oh yeah sorry i kinda forgot to post the question
so the question is, is it safe enough to use
you're saying that it uses too many voltage, but does that mean that its less stable or that it produces more heat, or even something else?

Typically auto overclocking programs and whatnot, use more voltage than you need to achieve the given overclock. I do not believe they would go over the limits of the CPU, but having more voltage will make the CPU run hotter and use more power. Too little voltage, on the other hand, can lead to instability. But if you do it yourself, you get get it at just the right amount.
!