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How much ram can a 32-bit windows have?

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November 22, 2010 3:22:46 AM

how much ram can a 32-bit windows have?

i have 6 gb of ram but my pc dosent know it, it says it has only has 2.75g does anyone know why

More about : ram bit windows

November 22, 2010 3:48:27 AM

32 bit systems can only recognize a certain amount of memory, and it's not 2.75, it's 4GB. They go up in powers of two. The highest 32 bit number is (in decimal) 4,294,967,296.

So...

1 B = 1/100 KB = 1/1000 MB = 1/1,000,000 GB.

So when a 32 system does calculations it can take in a number up to that size, and RAM has to do with calculations, doing processes, running applications etc.

A 64 bit system can take up to 16GB of RAM.

4^2 = 16.

Go go digital logic!
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a b } Memory
November 22, 2010 3:48:44 AM

Maximum of 4 Gigs (Approx) of RAM are supported by the 32Bit OS.
If you want to utilize more than that you have to change over to a 64Bit OS.

"So...

1 B = 1/100 KB = 1/1000 MB = 1/1,000,000 GB. "
Is kinda Wrong......
1 B is not equal to 1/100 KB......
Bits and Bytes are written differently...... :) 
1 whatever = 1/1000 of a Kilo of whatever..... :) 

and there is no 1 followed by zero's in the comps lingo.... it's 1024 multiples.....
1Byte = 8 Bits......
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November 22, 2010 3:52:01 AM

alyoshka said:
Maximum of 4 Gigs (Approx) of RAM are supported by the 32Bit OS.
If you want to utilize more than that you have to change over to a 64Bit OS.


What he said!
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November 22, 2010 3:52:14 AM

Best answer selected by choco2142.
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November 22, 2010 3:53:48 AM

Scooter92 said:
32 bit systems can only recognize a certain amount of memory, and it's not 2.75, it's 4GB. They go up in powers of two. The highest 32 bit number is (in decimal) 4,294,967,296.

So...

1 B = 1/100 KB = 1/1000 MB = 1/1,000,000 GB.

So when a 32 system does calculations it can take in a number up to that size, and RAM has to do with calculations, doing processes, running applications etc.

A 64 bit system can take up to 16GB of RAM.

4^2 = 16.

Go go digital logic!


you are really confusing :sweat: 
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November 22, 2010 4:01:43 AM

Sorry! I'll try to explain it better!

So your question regarded RAM, RAM has to do with running applications, and carrying out tasks etc. The way a computer functions is all with a number system called binary, base two. Our number system (decimal = 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10) is in base 10.

So the number 32, in "32-bit OS" refers to the longest binary sequence that a computer can use to calculate a "..process or task.." To save you the math, the longest 32 to bit binary number, in decimal is : 4,294,967,296.

That number is in bytes. So typical RAM today is measured in GB. So time for more math!

4,294,967,296 bytes = 4,294,967 KB = 4,295 MB = 4 GB (approx).

So the largest capacity for RAM in a 32 bit OS is 4 GB, the rest can't be used because the software can't count in that many digits!

Hope that helps :) 
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November 22, 2010 4:03:27 AM

alyoshka said:
Maximum of 4 Gigs (Approx) of RAM are supported by the 32Bit OS.
If you want to utilize more than that you have to change over to a 64Bit OS.

"So...

1 B = 1/100 KB = 1/1000 MB = 1/1,000,000 GB. "
Is kinda Wrong......
1 B is not equal to 1/100 KB......
Bits and Bytes are written differently...... :) 
1 whatever = 1/1000 of a Kilo of whatever..... :) 

and there is no 1 followed by zero's in the comps lingo.... it's 1024 multiples.....
1Byte = 8 Bits......


Sorry about the incorrect nomenclature, and I know it's not the exact numbers, I was making approximations as to not get to complex.

Trick question: what is four bits?
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a b } Memory
November 22, 2010 4:06:19 AM

What do you mean by the question "What is four bits?"
It's an Addressing system the most primitive and basic of all CPU's we know today....... also called a Nibble
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November 22, 2010 4:10:52 AM

Nice! You got it, haha :) 
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a b } Memory
November 22, 2010 12:05:07 PM

Scooter92 said:
32 bit systems can only recognize a certain amount of memory, and it's not 2.75, it's 4GB. They go up in powers of two. The highest 32 bit number is (in decimal) 4,294,967,296.

So...

1 B = 1/100 KB = 1/1000 MB = 1/1,000,000 GB.

So when a 32 system does calculations it can take in a number up to that size, and RAM has to do with calculations, doing processes, running applications etc.

A 64 bit system can take up to 16GB of RAM.

4^2 = 16.

Go go digital logic!


Your math is flawed. A 64 bit system can access
2^64 = 18446744073709551616 or 18.45 exabytes. Processor manufactures and/or the OS will limit this to much less since it's impossible to install this much physical memory.

You did get the 32 bit right.
2^32 = 4294967296
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November 22, 2010 5:05:49 PM

Thanks for the correction :) 
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November 23, 2010 3:45:52 AM

umm i got it ok you can stop ... yeah you know what i mean
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