Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

A duo processor rated 1.2Ghz is actually equivalent to two normal proc

Last response: in CPUs
Share
June 1, 2010 7:49:24 AM

Hi

They say Intel Core 2 Due has set of two processors under one die, or something like that. I'm sure you will get it. That means a duo processor rated 1.2Ghz is actually equivalent to two normal processors each rated 1.2Ghz. Is what I'm saying correct? I'm not a technical person, so lease keep your answer simple. Thanks.
a c 103 à CPUs
June 1, 2010 8:14:15 AM

Basic answer is Yes,
A Duo core chip has two processors capable of the stated maximum speed , I.E. 1.2GHz in this example, A Quad core has 4.

But I feel you're asking more than this, What do you need to know for? Maybe we can help more.
Moto
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
June 1, 2010 8:23:26 AM

The Core 2 Duo processor has two cores on a single die. A Core 2 Duo processor rated at 1.2GHz would theoretically perform the same as say two Core 2 Solo processors with one core on one die at 1.2GHz (I know they only exist in laptops, just imagine if you could use two in a single motherboard), if they have the same amount of cache, and are based on the exact same architecture, and possess the same technologies.
m
0
l
a c 83 à CPUs
June 1, 2010 4:35:28 PM

Quote:
Your really behind the times. There are 12 core cpu's out now.


If your looking at the regular server market from AMD/Intel. Intel is already shipping some sort of 48 core processor for testing/research purposes right now.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
June 1, 2010 4:51:43 PM

A private firm has a 96 core [non-x86] processor out; its simply about scale at this point.
m
0
l
June 1, 2010 11:52:24 PM

Lmeow said:
The Core 2 Duo processor has two cores on a single die. A Core 2 Duo processor rated at 1.2GHz would theoretically perform the same as say two Core 2 Solo processors with one core on one die at 1.2GHz (I know they only exist in laptops, just imagine if you could use two in a single motherboard), if they have the same amount of cache, and are based on the exact same architecture, and possess the same technologies.


Thanks, everyone.

Question 1:
What does 'core' mean in the context of a processor? Is it a chip capable of rendering calculations?

Question 2:
I see you have used two terms, Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Solo. Which suggests that 'Core 2' is in itself a kind of technology and has nothing to do with two set of cores on a same die; if it had been then the use of 'Core Solo' would be a more appropriate choice?

Please help me with the queries above.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
June 2, 2010 4:42:18 AM

1: The core is the part of the CPU that actually does the reading and executing of calculations. The more cores, the more calculations you can do at once. It's almost like having two or more processors in one (to an extent). So think of a quad core as 4 CPUs in one, or a dual core as 2 CPUs in one.

2: You are correct, Core2 is just the name for Intel's 'Core2' lineup. There are single, dual, and quad core CPUs in the Core2 lineup (Core2Solo / Core2Duo / Core2Quad). Core2Solo, yes, is a Core2 processor with a single core. Pretty sure the 'Core2Solo' is a laptop CPU however.
m
0
l
June 2, 2010 5:02:48 AM

I admire the way you have answered my queries with so simplicity and clarity. I get it now. By the way, what is so much new in i7 processor that everyone is craving for it? Is it with seven cores? I hope you won't mind my follow-on inquiries.

Thanks.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
June 2, 2010 5:28:07 AM

Well the i7 was a very powerful rendering beast back when it was released in late 2008 IIRC. Today it still is powerful, and currently the Core i7 980X is the most powerful widely available desktop consumer CPU. The Core i7 is a quad core with Hyper-Threading, providing double the cores for a total of eight. However, those extra four virtual cores are which are virtual and aren't as powerful as the real CPU cores. (Technically speaking, threads not cores, but that's another story...)

Here is the main outline of the current generation of 'Nehalem' (Intel's current CPU architecture) CPUs (Intel-wise):

Pentium G6950 - Dual core without Hyper-Threading (thus just two real cores)
Core i3 - Dual core with Hyper-Threading (thus two real cores and two virtual cores)
Core i5 600 series - Dual core with Hyper-Threading (thus two real cores and two virtual cores)
Core i5 700 series - Quad core without Hyper-Threading (thus just four real cores)
Core i7 800 series - Quad core with Hyper-Threading (thus four real cores and four virtual cores)
Core i7 900 series - Quad core with Hyper-Threading (thus four real cores and four virtual cores)
m
0
l
June 2, 2010 8:33:30 AM

Thank you very much for the detailed reply. Though I still have some questions, it seems asking them would simply invoke technical replies which I would be at loss of understanding because of my lack of technical know-how. Anyway, thanks a lot, everyone. Best wishes.
m
0
l
June 2, 2010 11:26:22 AM

I was searching the net and frequently encountered the term 'lithography' in the context of the processor. I believe i7 processor uses 35nm lithography and Atom N450 45nm. What is this lithography? Can it be analogize to a wire used to connect different parts on a CPU? What is the advantage of using increasingly lower lithography in newer models? Does it have anything to do with power dissipation, or more number of transistors on the same processor? If nm size stands for the diameter of the connecting wire, then a wire having less diameter dissipates more energy.

Please help me with the confusion above.
m
0
l
June 2, 2010 12:33:02 PM

Lithography is a method of etching a "picture" into a piece of silicon that makes up the circuit.

BTW: i7 and for that matter i3 and i5 are simply the brand names for the newest series of chip after the Core and Core2.
m
0
l
January 21, 2011 7:15:35 PM

Raidur said:
1: The core is the part of the CPU that actually does the reading and executing of calculations.


Hi

I know it has been a while but it would be better to ask it here. If 'core' is the central part of a CPU, then what is the remaining part of a CPU referred as? Non-core part? Please let me know. Thanks.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 21, 2011 7:26:14 PM

haroonahmad said:
I was searching the net and frequently encountered the term 'lithography' in the context of the processor. I believe i7 processor uses 35nm lithography and Atom N450 45nm. What is this lithography? Can it be analogize to a wire used to connect different parts on a CPU? What is the advantage of using increasingly lower lithography in newer models? Does it have anything to do with power dissipation, or more number of transistors on the same processor? If nm size stands for the diameter of the connecting wire, then a wire having less diameter dissipates more energy.

Please help me with the confusion above.


Just a quick note: the majority of the i7s use 45nm, with the exception of some of the notebook CPUs (the dual core i7s) and any of the latest Sandy Bridge models (the ones with a 4 digit model number). These newest ones use 32nm.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 21, 2011 11:16:25 PM

haroonahmad said:
Hi

I know it has been a while but it would be better to ask it here. If 'core' is the central part of a CPU, then what is the remaining part of a CPU referred as? Non-core part? Please let me know. Thanks.

It can change based on what the company calls it.

Intel's now old i7 generation(900 series), has the cores location, and they called everything else the 'uncore'.

In the new gen of 'Core' (i3,i5,i7-2000 series), there is the cores, then there is a graphics chip capable of video encode/decode along with weak 3D graphics and graphics acceleration, some L3 cache, and everything else is now the 'system agent'

AMD still calls whatever isn't their cores the 'uncore'.
m
0
l
January 21, 2011 11:21:45 PM

Haven't you guys heard of the 988 core CPU's? :pt1cable: 
m
0
l
January 22, 2011 10:53:27 AM

Haserath said:
It can change based on what the company calls it.

Intel's now old i7 generation(900 series), has the cores location, and they called everything else the 'uncore'.

In the new gen of 'Core' (i3,i5,i7-2000 series), there is the cores, then there is a graphics chip capable of video encode/decode along with weak 3D graphics and graphics acceleration, some L3 cache, and everything else is now the 'system agent'

AMD still calls whatever isn't their cores the 'uncore'.


Thanks, Haserath. It was really helpful.

Then, they also use the terms: chip, die, core. They say 'core' is on the 'die'. What is a 'die' and a 'chip'? Please remember that I'm not a technical person. Please your reply simple. Thanks.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 22, 2011 4:48:32 PM

The chip and die are basically the same thing.

The die is the entire processor within the package that you put into a
motherboard. The package consists of the die, the heatspreader, and the Pcb(where the pins are located).

When I said graphics chip, I was referring to all the different pieces of what can be considered the graphics part of the entire die(processor, graphics, etc.).
m
0
l
February 3, 2011 5:56:55 AM

Haserath said:
The chip and die are basically the same thing.

The die is the entire processor within the package that you put into a
motherboard. The package consists of the die, the heatspreader, and the Pcb(where the pins are located).

When I said graphics chip, I was referring to all the different pieces of what can be considered the graphics part of the entire die(processor, graphics, etc.).


Hi Haserath

I was thinking that perhaps the 'die' is the part where core(s) is located, and the 'chip' refers to the entire thing - core(s) + uncore parts. What is your opinion on this?






m
0
l
!