"BROKEN" USER ACCOUNT

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up my
account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to "Power
User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created another
"Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his full
name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed the
"PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for all
three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the directory
structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY INITIAL
ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing my full
name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to change
the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to take the
change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot. Finally,
just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders, the
change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is now
inaccessible.

When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account name)/PCname", but
without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc. from
scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
"Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My account"
>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
(original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the name
revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format, again
without success.

Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data? PLEASE!!
9 answers Last reply
More about broken user account
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data is
    quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up and
    fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.

    That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed in the
    following Knowledge Base Article:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up my
    > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to "Power
    > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    > another
    > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his
    > full
    > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed the
    > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for
    > all
    > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the directory
    > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    > INITIAL
    > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing my
    > full
    > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to change
    > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to take
    > the
    > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot. Finally,
    > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders, the
    > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is now
    > inaccessible.
    >
    > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account name)/PCname",
    > but
    > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc. from
    > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My account"
    >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the
    > name
    > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format,
    > again
    > without success.
    >
    > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    > PLEASE!!
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 08:35:08 -0800, "KenG"

    Argh, user account blues again...

    >Everything worked fine, except that the directory structure under
    >"Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY INITIAL ONE
    >showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing my full
    >name, which seemd to revealing to me.

    When you rename an account, this does not propagate to the name of the
    user account subtree, as you've noticed. If you try and fight that,
    e.g. by renaming this around etc., you end up with a real mess.

    This might not matter, but sometimes does. For example, a mixed
    Win9x/XP environment needs a 3rd-party replacement for WinPopUp, if XP
    users are to joind existing Win9x WinPopUp use. Such a tool is
    RealPopUp, and it can send msgs to users or computers by name.

    But RealPopUp uses the original name - so if that's been changed, you
    can't stop it still working. Worse; if that (old) name is used
    elsewhere on the LAN, the traffic gets mixed up... e.g...

    PC 1 called Jane, user is Janet
    PC 2 called Fred, user is Fred

    ....now Janet gets a new PC, so it's...

    PC 1 called Jane, user is Mark
    PC 2 called Fred, user is Fred
    PC 3 called Boss, user is Janet

    ....but any RealPopUp msg sent to Janet will appear on both PC1 and
    PC3; there's no way to ever be able to use Janet on PC3 alone, short
    of wiping PC1 and re-installing everything. Awful.

    >just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders, the
    >change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is now
    >inaccessible.

    Yup. A brittle luxury, this user account stuff.

    >When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    >Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account name)/PCname", but
    >without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc. from
    >scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    >"Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My account"
    >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    >(original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the name
    >revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format, again
    >without success.

    >Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data? PLEASE!!

    I'd work on the PC "under anaesthetic", i.e. from a maintenance OS
    that can read all files and doesn't care what the OS things is going
    on. But if you've used NTFS, and especially if you hardened access to
    data (e.g. "make my files private") you may have locked yourself out.


    >--------------- ---- --- -- - - - -
    I'm baaaack!
    >--------------- ---- --- -- - - - -
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have regular
    unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch involving
    repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just been
    forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script. I do
    have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago. however,
    if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from that
    date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway. The
    article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account with
    the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings from
    the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was which
    files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the article and
    other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my original
    profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!

    Ken Grush

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:

    > The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data is
    > quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up and
    > fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    >
    > That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed in the
    > following Knowledge Base Article:
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    > > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up my
    > > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to "Power
    > > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    > > another
    > > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his
    > > full
    > > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed the
    > > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for
    > > all
    > > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the directory
    > > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    > > INITIAL
    > > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing my
    > > full
    > > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to change
    > > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to take
    > > the
    > > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot. Finally,
    > > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders, the
    > > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is now
    > > inaccessible.
    > >
    > > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    > > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account name)/PCname",
    > > but
    > > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc. from
    > > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    > > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My account"
    > >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    > > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the
    > > name
    > > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format,
    > > again
    > > without success.
    > >
    > > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    > > PLEASE!!
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    You're welcome, Ken.

    Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost three
    hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the least.<G>

    Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of something
    you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.

    I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations such as
    this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer and
    sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.

    Good luck.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    > regular
    > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    > involving
    > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just been
    > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script. I
    > do
    > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    > however,
    > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from that
    > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway.
    > The
    > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account
    > with
    > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings
    > from
    > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was
    > which
    > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the article
    > and
    > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my original
    > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!
    >
    > Ken Grush
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >
    >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data is
    >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up and
    >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    >>
    >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed in
    >> the
    >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up
    >> > my
    >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    >> > "Power
    >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    >> > another
    >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his
    >> > full
    >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed
    >> > the
    >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for
    >> > all
    >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    >> > directory
    >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    >> > INITIAL
    >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing
    >> > my
    >> > full
    >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to
    >> > change
    >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to
    >> > take
    >> > the
    >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    >> > Finally,
    >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders,
    >> > the
    >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is
    >> > now
    >> > inaccessible.
    >> >
    >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    >> > name)/PCname",
    >> > but
    >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc.
    >> > from
    >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    >> > account"
    >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the
    >> > name
    >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format,
    >> > again
    >> > without success.
    >> >
    >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    >> > PLEASE!!
    >>
    >>
    >>
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    Thanks again, Michael,

    The only other thing I would appreciate your advice on is whether there is
    any advantage in using a restored copy of the profile folder, albeit 4 weeks
    old, over the one sitting on my HD now but with the Ntuser data corrupted.
    The restored version would probably work for log on right away, assuming that
    I restore the directory names to their original format, as it was created
    before my ill-advised directory name change. But, if I want a nonrevealing
    directory structure, I would have to create a new account with the desired
    name to launch the new directory structure and then copy exisitng (backup or
    current) configuration and application data into the new directory. I guess
    it's crucial to know if the Ntuser files are the only corrupted part of the
    current folder. As I changed the name of the user account to the nickname
    before changing the directory folder(s) name(s), this is how I planned to
    proceed, logging on as Administrator.

    1. Rename the existing account to the longer, full name version.
    2. Create a new user account with the desired nickname as its name.
    3. Copy exisitng user account data to the new account --
    **this is where I need to know whether it would be better to use a
    restored
    copy or the current folder. In either case I will need to ensure
    Outlook data
    is imported from the most current folder.
    4. Log off and log on as the new user.
    5. Import, if it didn't come accross with the "copy and paste", any Outlook
    data
    files. I don't use Outlook Express.

    Are there any other "imports" which need to be done?

    I couldn't agree more with your emphasis on regular backups. A number of
    authors have recommended a second HD for this purpose, together with remotely
    stored archived copies, of course, and that is the course I took.

    I would like to use my favorite "restoration" app, GoBack Deluxe, because it
    has several advantages over the WXP utility. With GoBack, you can specify
    the size and exact location of the restore database (WXP puts restore
    "points" on every partition of every drive), and every file on the PC is
    included (WXP focuses on "system" files as I understand it). Of course
    backups are needed in case of HD failure or to selectively restore individual
    files and/or file versions. This always worked well for me, being much
    easier than restoring from backup. However, I recently followed
    recommendations in the Resource Kit and installed the Recovery Console at the
    root of my system drive. Unfortunately, GoBack has some effect on the MBR,
    blocking access, so it seems to make it impossible to boot into the Recovery
    Console. I get a message that the Console cannot access "KBDUS.DLL" and am
    told to restart the computer. I was wondering whether there is anything I
    can do to get around this. Currently, the Recovery Console is on the box and
    working well, but GoBack is uninstalled.

    Thanks again for your help!

    Ken Grush



    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:

    > You're welcome, Ken.
    >
    > Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost three
    > hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the least.<G>
    >
    > Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    > recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of something
    > you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.
    >
    > I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations such as
    > this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer and
    > sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    > thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    > > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    > > regular
    > > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    > > involving
    > > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just been
    > > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script. I
    > > do
    > > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    > > however,
    > > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from that
    > > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway.
    > > The
    > > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account
    > > with
    > > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    > > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings
    > > from
    > > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was
    > > which
    > > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the article
    > > and
    > > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my original
    > > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!
    > >
    > > Ken Grush
    > >
    > > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    > >
    > >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data is
    > >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up and
    > >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    > >>
    > >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed in
    > >> the
    > >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    > >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > >> Windows Shell/User
    > >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    > >>
    > >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    > >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up
    > >> > my
    > >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    > >> > "Power
    > >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    > >> > another
    > >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his
    > >> > full
    > >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed
    > >> > the
    > >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for
    > >> > all
    > >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    > >> > directory
    > >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    > >> > INITIAL
    > >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing
    > >> > my
    > >> > full
    > >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to
    > >> > change
    > >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to
    > >> > take
    > >> > the
    > >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    > >> > Finally,
    > >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders,
    > >> > the
    > >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is
    > >> > now
    > >> > inaccessible.
    > >> >
    > >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    > >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    > >> > name)/PCname",
    > >> > but
    > >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc.
    > >> > from
    > >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    > >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    > >> > account"
    > >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    > >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the
    > >> > name
    > >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format,
    > >> > again
    > >> > without success.
    > >> >
    > >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    > >> > PLEASE!!
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    Thanks again, Michael,

    The only other thing I would appreciate your advice on is whether there is
    any advantage in using a restored copy of the profile folder, albeit 4 weeks
    old, over the one sitting on my HD now but with the Ntuser data corrupted.
    The restored version would probably work for log on right away, assuming that
    I restore the directory names to their original format, as it was created
    before my ill-advised directory name change. But, if I want a nonrevealing
    directory structure, I would have to create a new account with the desired
    name to launch the new directory structure and then copy exisitng (backup or
    current) configuration and application data into the new directory. I guess
    it's crucial to know if the Ntuser files are the only corrupted part of the
    current folder. As I changed the name of the user account to the nickname
    before changing the directory folder(s) name(s), this is how I planned to
    proceed, logging on as Administrator.

    1. Rename the existing account to the longer, full name version.
    2. Create a new user account with the desired nickname as its name.
    3. Copy exisitng user account data to the new account --
    **this is where I need to know whether it would be better to use a
    restored
    copy or the current folder. In either case I will need to ensure
    Outlook data
    is imported from the most current folder.
    4. Log off and log on as the new user.
    5. Import, if it didn't come accross with the "copy and paste", any Outlook
    data
    files. I don't use Outlook Express.

    Are there any other "imports" which need to be done?

    I couldn't agree more with your emphasis on regular backups. A number of
    authors have recommended a second HD for this purpose, together with remotely
    stored archived copies, of course, and that is the course I took.

    I would like to use my favorite "restoration" app, GoBack Deluxe, because it
    has several advantages over the WXP utility. With GoBack, you can specify
    the size and exact location of the restore database (WXP puts restore
    "points" on every partition of every drive), and every file on the PC is
    included (WXP focuses on "system" files as I understand it). Of course
    backups are needed in case of HD failure or to selectively restore individual
    files and/or file versions. This always worked well for me, being much
    easier than restoring from backup. However, I recently followed
    recommendations in the Resource Kit and installed the Recovery Console at the
    root of my system drive. Unfortunately, GoBack has some effect on the MBR,
    blocking access, so it seems to make it impossible to boot into the Recovery
    Console. I get a message that the Console cannot access "KBDUS.DLL" and am
    told to restart the computer. I was wondering whether there is anything I
    can do to get around this. Currently, the Recovery Console is on the box and
    working well, but GoBack is uninstalled.

    Thanks again for your help!

    Ken Grush

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:

    > You're welcome, Ken.
    >
    > Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost three
    > hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the least.<G>
    >
    > Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    > recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of something
    > you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.
    >
    > I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations such as
    > this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer and
    > sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    > thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    > > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    > > regular
    > > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    > > involving
    > > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just been
    > > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script. I
    > > do
    > > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    > > however,
    > > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from that
    > > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway.
    > > The
    > > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account
    > > with
    > > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    > > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings
    > > from
    > > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was
    > > which
    > > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the article
    > > and
    > > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my original
    > > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!
    > >
    > > Ken Grush
    > >
    > > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    > >
    > >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data is
    > >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up and
    > >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    > >>
    > >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed in
    > >> the
    > >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    > >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > >> Windows Shell/User
    > >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    > >>
    > >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    > >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting up
    > >> > my
    > >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    > >> > "Power
    > >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    > >> > another
    > >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving his
    > >> > full
    > >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed
    > >> > the
    > >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords for
    > >> > all
    > >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    > >> > directory
    > >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    > >> > INITIAL
    > >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in showing
    > >> > my
    > >> > full
    > >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to
    > >> > change
    > >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to
    > >> > take
    > >> > the
    > >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    > >> > Finally,
    > >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders,
    > >> > the
    > >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile is
    > >> > now
    > >> > inaccessible.
    > >> >
    > >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents and
    > >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    > >> > name)/PCname",
    > >> > but
    > >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook, etc.
    > >> > from
    > >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried, under
    > >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    > >> > account"
    > >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the old
    > >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of the
    > >> > name
    > >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original format,
    > >> > again
    > >> > without success.
    > >> >
    > >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    > >> > PLEASE!!
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    I would restore from backup. The one sitting on your hard drive is the one
    with the problem and we're not exactly certain of the cause but it's likely
    sitting in the profile already on your hard drive.

    Aside from Outlook, as long as you can get to the old data, I can't think of
    anything off-hand that would need to be imported. Perhaps the Favorites,
    there is an import/export function on the File menu in IE and it works great
    for this.

    I have a backup computer and I additionally save my data files to a CD-RW.
    I use several different means of backup, that way if one goes bad, I have
    additional sets in some other medium. For example, I make a selective
    backup of my data files using a backup program as well as saving any data
    file specifically to my hard drive and to a CD-RW. CD-RW disks do go bad
    eventually so I also keep a copy of all of this on the backup computer. I
    also create images of my system periodically. One I keep on a separate
    partition for convenience and another I keep on the backup computer. When I
    move to a DVD-burner I'll also keep one on a DVD disk.

    Image files are extremely handy. If you are about to do something you know
    might cause your system to tank, you can create an image file of your setup.
    If the system tanks, the imaging software usually has a means of booting and
    running the image app which would allow you to restore the image file. At
    the very worst, I might have to reinstall XP, then install the imaging
    application and then restore the image. Even in that scenario, I'd be up
    and running again within 30 minutes to an hour.

    The beauty of System Restore is that it only restores your system settings,
    sometimes that is desirable. SR was never meant to be a backup application
    as I'm sure you realize is quite obvious. GoBack has its advantages but
    since I use image files supplemented by my backup, it's not really an issue
    for me.

    Also, if you get a virus or some sort of malware and you don't know
    precisely when you got it, GoBack can be dangerous because you may simply be
    restoring an already corrupt setup. I keep images of a clean install of XP,
    another with a clean install plus my major applications installed and then,
    I periodically make images of my setup as it is in its current state, all of
    which is supplemented by my data backups.

    You would have to visit the Symantec website and check their tech papers,
    knowledge base or with their tech support about the specific issue you
    describe.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:072D3F45-7DBC-4BD5-9689-7BFC2ED4B5D1@microsoft.com...
    > Thanks again, Michael,
    >
    > The only other thing I would appreciate your advice on is whether there is
    > any advantage in using a restored copy of the profile folder, albeit 4
    > weeks
    > old, over the one sitting on my HD now but with the Ntuser data corrupted.
    > The restored version would probably work for log on right away, assuming
    > that
    > I restore the directory names to their original format, as it was created
    > before my ill-advised directory name change. But, if I want a
    > nonrevealing
    > directory structure, I would have to create a new account with the desired
    > name to launch the new directory structure and then copy exisitng (backup
    > or
    > current) configuration and application data into the new directory. I
    > guess
    > it's crucial to know if the Ntuser files are the only corrupted part of
    > the
    > current folder. As I changed the name of the user account to the nickname
    > before changing the directory folder(s) name(s), this is how I planned to
    > proceed, logging on as Administrator.
    >
    > 1. Rename the existing account to the longer, full name version.
    > 2. Create a new user account with the desired nickname as its name.
    > 3. Copy exisitng user account data to the new account --
    > **this is where I need to know whether it would be better to use a
    > restored
    > copy or the current folder. In either case I will need to ensure
    > Outlook data
    > is imported from the most current folder.
    > 4. Log off and log on as the new user.
    > 5. Import, if it didn't come accross with the "copy and paste", any
    > Outlook
    > data
    > files. I don't use Outlook Express.
    >
    > Are there any other "imports" which need to be done?
    >
    > I couldn't agree more with your emphasis on regular backups. A number of
    > authors have recommended a second HD for this purpose, together with
    > remotely
    > stored archived copies, of course, and that is the course I took.
    >
    > I would like to use my favorite "restoration" app, GoBack Deluxe, because
    > it
    > has several advantages over the WXP utility. With GoBack, you can specify
    > the size and exact location of the restore database (WXP puts restore
    > "points" on every partition of every drive), and every file on the PC is
    > included (WXP focuses on "system" files as I understand it). Of course
    > backups are needed in case of HD failure or to selectively restore
    > individual
    > files and/or file versions. This always worked well for me, being much
    > easier than restoring from backup. However, I recently followed
    > recommendations in the Resource Kit and installed the Recovery Console at
    > the
    > root of my system drive. Unfortunately, GoBack has some effect on the
    > MBR,
    > blocking access, so it seems to make it impossible to boot into the
    > Recovery
    > Console. I get a message that the Console cannot access "KBDUS.DLL" and
    > am
    > told to restart the computer. I was wondering whether there is anything I
    > can do to get around this. Currently, the Recovery Console is on the box
    > and
    > working well, but GoBack is uninstalled.
    >
    > Thanks again for your help!
    >
    > Ken Grush
    >
    >
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >
    >> You're welcome, Ken.
    >>
    >> Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost
    >> three
    >> hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the least.<G>
    >>
    >> Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    >> recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of
    >> something
    >> you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.
    >>
    >> I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations such
    >> as
    >> this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer and
    >> sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    >> thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.
    >>
    >> Good luck.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    >> > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    >> > regular
    >> > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    >> > involving
    >> > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just
    >> > been
    >> > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script.
    >> > I
    >> > do
    >> > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    >> > however,
    >> > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from
    >> > that
    >> > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway.
    >> > The
    >> > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account
    >> > with
    >> > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    >> > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings
    >> > from
    >> > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was
    >> > which
    >> > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the
    >> > article
    >> > and
    >> > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my
    >> > original
    >> > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!
    >> >
    >> > Ken Grush
    >> >
    >> > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data
    >> >> is
    >> >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up
    >> >> and
    >> >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    >> >>
    >> >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed
    >> >> in
    >> >> the
    >> >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    >> >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> >> Windows Shell/User
    >> >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >> >>
    >> >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    >> >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting
    >> >> > up
    >> >> > my
    >> >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    >> >> > "Power
    >> >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    >> >> > another
    >> >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving
    >> >> > his
    >> >> > full
    >> >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords
    >> >> > for
    >> >> > all
    >> >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    >> >> > directory
    >> >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    >> >> > INITIAL
    >> >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in
    >> >> > showing
    >> >> > my
    >> >> > full
    >> >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to
    >> >> > change
    >> >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to
    >> >> > take
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    >> >> > Finally,
    >> >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders,
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile
    >> >> > is
    >> >> > now
    >> >> > inaccessible.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    >> >> > name)/PCname",
    >> >> > but
    >> >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook,
    >> >> > etc.
    >> >> > from
    >> >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried,
    >> >> > under
    >> >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    >> >> > account"
    >> >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the
    >> >> >>old
    >> >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > name
    >> >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original
    >> >> > format,
    >> >> > again
    >> >> > without success.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    >> >> > PLEASE!!
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    Thanks for the added insights. Until I read your latest response, I had the
    most diverse set of backup mechanisms and destinations I knew of.
    Congratulations! Although, at times it is a bit difficult to recall exactly
    which file or file version is on which date backup, but that's what backup
    browsers are for.

    I would like to strongly recommend Dantz Retrospect 6.5 Professional, a very
    scalable and sophisticated backup utility. Short of corporate Veritas type
    agents, it has the most versatile, powerful and fast backup capabilities I've
    found. Be prepared to actually read the manual, as some of it's extensive
    repertoire of options are not intuitive or readily apparent. But when you've
    learned it, it a snap to configure and run. I have the "Professional"
    license, which includes up to 2 "Clients" in addition to the Base PC. It's a
    bit pricey relative to other apps, and the annual maintenance contract
    (~$130.00/yr.), which I also recommend, isn't cheap either. However, it
    gives you access not only to all updates, but also to new major upgrade
    versions (one's due out 1st quarter of 2005) as well as 8 x 5 (or maybe 6)
    access to customer service and technical advice/support at no additional
    charge. Check it out. Thanks again for an informative and interesting
    exchange!

    Ken Grush

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:

    > I would restore from backup. The one sitting on your hard drive is the one
    > with the problem and we're not exactly certain of the cause but it's likely
    > sitting in the profile already on your hard drive.
    >
    > Aside from Outlook, as long as you can get to the old data, I can't think of
    > anything off-hand that would need to be imported. Perhaps the Favorites,
    > there is an import/export function on the File menu in IE and it works great
    > for this.
    >
    > I have a backup computer and I additionally save my data files to a CD-RW.
    > I use several different means of backup, that way if one goes bad, I have
    > additional sets in some other medium. For example, I make a selective
    > backup of my data files using a backup program as well as saving any data
    > file specifically to my hard drive and to a CD-RW. CD-RW disks do go bad
    > eventually so I also keep a copy of all of this on the backup computer. I
    > also create images of my system periodically. One I keep on a separate
    > partition for convenience and another I keep on the backup computer. When I
    > move to a DVD-burner I'll also keep one on a DVD disk.
    >
    > Image files are extremely handy. If you are about to do something you know
    > might cause your system to tank, you can create an image file of your setup.
    > If the system tanks, the imaging software usually has a means of booting and
    > running the image app which would allow you to restore the image file. At
    > the very worst, I might have to reinstall XP, then install the imaging
    > application and then restore the image. Even in that scenario, I'd be up
    > and running again within 30 minutes to an hour.
    >
    > The beauty of System Restore is that it only restores your system settings,
    > sometimes that is desirable. SR was never meant to be a backup application
    > as I'm sure you realize is quite obvious. GoBack has its advantages but
    > since I use image files supplemented by my backup, it's not really an issue
    > for me.
    >
    > Also, if you get a virus or some sort of malware and you don't know
    > precisely when you got it, GoBack can be dangerous because you may simply be
    > restoring an already corrupt setup. I keep images of a clean install of XP,
    > another with a clean install plus my major applications installed and then,
    > I periodically make images of my setup as it is in its current state, all of
    > which is supplemented by my data backups.
    >
    > You would have to visit the Symantec website and check their tech papers,
    > knowledge base or with their tech support about the specific issue you
    > describe.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:072D3F45-7DBC-4BD5-9689-7BFC2ED4B5D1@microsoft.com...
    > > Thanks again, Michael,
    > >
    > > The only other thing I would appreciate your advice on is whether there is
    > > any advantage in using a restored copy of the profile folder, albeit 4
    > > weeks
    > > old, over the one sitting on my HD now but with the Ntuser data corrupted.
    > > The restored version would probably work for log on right away, assuming
    > > that
    > > I restore the directory names to their original format, as it was created
    > > before my ill-advised directory name change. But, if I want a
    > > nonrevealing
    > > directory structure, I would have to create a new account with the desired
    > > name to launch the new directory structure and then copy exisitng (backup
    > > or
    > > current) configuration and application data into the new directory. I
    > > guess
    > > it's crucial to know if the Ntuser files are the only corrupted part of
    > > the
    > > current folder. As I changed the name of the user account to the nickname
    > > before changing the directory folder(s) name(s), this is how I planned to
    > > proceed, logging on as Administrator.
    > >
    > > 1. Rename the existing account to the longer, full name version.
    > > 2. Create a new user account with the desired nickname as its name.
    > > 3. Copy exisitng user account data to the new account --
    > > **this is where I need to know whether it would be better to use a
    > > restored
    > > copy or the current folder. In either case I will need to ensure
    > > Outlook data
    > > is imported from the most current folder.
    > > 4. Log off and log on as the new user.
    > > 5. Import, if it didn't come accross with the "copy and paste", any
    > > Outlook
    > > data
    > > files. I don't use Outlook Express.
    > >
    > > Are there any other "imports" which need to be done?
    > >
    > > I couldn't agree more with your emphasis on regular backups. A number of
    > > authors have recommended a second HD for this purpose, together with
    > > remotely
    > > stored archived copies, of course, and that is the course I took.
    > >
    > > I would like to use my favorite "restoration" app, GoBack Deluxe, because
    > > it
    > > has several advantages over the WXP utility. With GoBack, you can specify
    > > the size and exact location of the restore database (WXP puts restore
    > > "points" on every partition of every drive), and every file on the PC is
    > > included (WXP focuses on "system" files as I understand it). Of course
    > > backups are needed in case of HD failure or to selectively restore
    > > individual
    > > files and/or file versions. This always worked well for me, being much
    > > easier than restoring from backup. However, I recently followed
    > > recommendations in the Resource Kit and installed the Recovery Console at
    > > the
    > > root of my system drive. Unfortunately, GoBack has some effect on the
    > > MBR,
    > > blocking access, so it seems to make it impossible to boot into the
    > > Recovery
    > > Console. I get a message that the Console cannot access "KBDUS.DLL" and
    > > am
    > > told to restart the computer. I was wondering whether there is anything I
    > > can do to get around this. Currently, the Recovery Console is on the box
    > > and
    > > working well, but GoBack is uninstalled.
    > >
    > > Thanks again for your help!
    > >
    > > Ken Grush
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    > >
    > >> You're welcome, Ken.
    > >>
    > >> Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost
    > >> three
    > >> hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the least.<G>
    > >>
    > >> Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    > >> recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of
    > >> something
    > >> you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.
    > >>
    > >> I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations such
    > >> as
    > >> this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer and
    > >> sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    > >> thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.
    > >>
    > >> Good luck.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > >> Windows Shell/User
    > >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    > >>
    > >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    > >> > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    > >> > regular
    > >> > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    > >> > involving
    > >> > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just
    > >> > been
    > >> > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup script.
    > >> > I
    > >> > do
    > >> > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    > >> > however,
    > >> > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from
    > >> > that
    > >> > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account anyway.
    > >> > The
    > >> > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new account
    > >> > with
    > >> > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually), the
    > >> > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration settings
    > >> > from
    > >> > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information was
    > >> > which
    > >> > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the
    > >> > article
    > >> > and
    > >> > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my
    > >> > original
    > >> > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly advice!
    > >> >
    > >> > Ken Grush
    > >> >
    > >> > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that data
    > >> >> is
    > >> >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing up
    > >> >> and
    > >> >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as instructed
    > >> >> in
    > >> >> the
    > >> >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    > >> >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    > >> >>
    > >> >> --
    > >> >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > >> >> Windows Shell/User
    > >> >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > >> >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    > >> >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in setting
    > >> >> > up
    > >> >> > my
    > >> >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    > >> >> > "Power
    > >> >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then created
    > >> >> > another
    > >> >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially giving
    > >> >> > his
    > >> >> > full
    > >> >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then renamed
    > >> >> > the
    > >> >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created passwords
    > >> >> > for
    > >> >> > all
    > >> >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    > >> >> > directory
    > >> >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT MY
    > >> >> > INITIAL
    > >> >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in
    > >> >> > showing
    > >> >> > my
    > >> >> > full
    > >> >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times to
    > >> >> > change
    > >> >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed to
    > >> >> > take
    > >> >> > the
    > >> >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    > >> >> > Finally,
    > >> >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant folders,
    > >> >> > the
    > >> >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original profile
    > >> >> > is
    > >> >> > now
    > >> >> > inaccessible.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new "Documents
    > >> >> > and
    > >> >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    > >> >> > name)/PCname",
    > >> >> > but
    > >> >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook,
    > >> >> > etc.
    > >> >> > from
    > >> >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried,
    > >> >> > under
    > >> >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    > >> >> > account"
    > >> >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to the
    > >> >> >>old
    > >> >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all of
    > >> >> > the
    > >> >> > name
    > >> >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original
    > >> >> > format,
    > >> >> > again
    > >> >> > without success.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user data?
    > >> >> > PLEASE!!
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    I'm familiar with Dantz and it is indeed a very powerful piece of software
    but as your post suggests you really should be an experienced user.

    I find Stomp's Backup MyPC, provided by Veritas and formerly known as Backup
    Exec is more than adequate to my own needs especially given this supplements
    my imaging software. It's also a little more user friendly than the Dantz
    product though I do believe the Dantz product is more versatile and quite
    robust.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3B4DAED6-2143-455E-974C-5187A3A6CB57@microsoft.com...
    > Thanks for the added insights. Until I read your latest response, I had
    > the
    > most diverse set of backup mechanisms and destinations I knew of.
    > Congratulations! Although, at times it is a bit difficult to recall
    > exactly
    > which file or file version is on which date backup, but that's what backup
    > browsers are for.
    >
    > I would like to strongly recommend Dantz Retrospect 6.5 Professional, a
    > very
    > scalable and sophisticated backup utility. Short of corporate Veritas
    > type
    > agents, it has the most versatile, powerful and fast backup capabilities
    > I've
    > found. Be prepared to actually read the manual, as some of it's extensive
    > repertoire of options are not intuitive or readily apparent. But when
    > you've
    > learned it, it a snap to configure and run. I have the "Professional"
    > license, which includes up to 2 "Clients" in addition to the Base PC.
    > It's a
    > bit pricey relative to other apps, and the annual maintenance contract
    > (~$130.00/yr.), which I also recommend, isn't cheap either. However, it
    > gives you access not only to all updates, but also to new major upgrade
    > versions (one's due out 1st quarter of 2005) as well as 8 x 5 (or maybe 6)
    > access to customer service and technical advice/support at no additional
    > charge. Check it out. Thanks again for an informative and interesting
    > exchange!
    >
    > Ken Grush
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >
    >> I would restore from backup. The one sitting on your hard drive is the
    >> one
    >> with the problem and we're not exactly certain of the cause but it's
    >> likely
    >> sitting in the profile already on your hard drive.
    >>
    >> Aside from Outlook, as long as you can get to the old data, I can't think
    >> of
    >> anything off-hand that would need to be imported. Perhaps the Favorites,
    >> there is an import/export function on the File menu in IE and it works
    >> great
    >> for this.
    >>
    >> I have a backup computer and I additionally save my data files to a
    >> CD-RW.
    >> I use several different means of backup, that way if one goes bad, I have
    >> additional sets in some other medium. For example, I make a selective
    >> backup of my data files using a backup program as well as saving any data
    >> file specifically to my hard drive and to a CD-RW. CD-RW disks do go bad
    >> eventually so I also keep a copy of all of this on the backup computer.
    >> I
    >> also create images of my system periodically. One I keep on a separate
    >> partition for convenience and another I keep on the backup computer.
    >> When I
    >> move to a DVD-burner I'll also keep one on a DVD disk.
    >>
    >> Image files are extremely handy. If you are about to do something you
    >> know
    >> might cause your system to tank, you can create an image file of your
    >> setup.
    >> If the system tanks, the imaging software usually has a means of booting
    >> and
    >> running the image app which would allow you to restore the image file.
    >> At
    >> the very worst, I might have to reinstall XP, then install the imaging
    >> application and then restore the image. Even in that scenario, I'd be up
    >> and running again within 30 minutes to an hour.
    >>
    >> The beauty of System Restore is that it only restores your system
    >> settings,
    >> sometimes that is desirable. SR was never meant to be a backup
    >> application
    >> as I'm sure you realize is quite obvious. GoBack has its advantages but
    >> since I use image files supplemented by my backup, it's not really an
    >> issue
    >> for me.
    >>
    >> Also, if you get a virus or some sort of malware and you don't know
    >> precisely when you got it, GoBack can be dangerous because you may simply
    >> be
    >> restoring an already corrupt setup. I keep images of a clean install of
    >> XP,
    >> another with a clean install plus my major applications installed and
    >> then,
    >> I periodically make images of my setup as it is in its current state, all
    >> of
    >> which is supplemented by my data backups.
    >>
    >> You would have to visit the Symantec website and check their tech papers,
    >> knowledge base or with their tech support about the specific issue you
    >> describe.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:072D3F45-7DBC-4BD5-9689-7BFC2ED4B5D1@microsoft.com...
    >> > Thanks again, Michael,
    >> >
    >> > The only other thing I would appreciate your advice on is whether there
    >> > is
    >> > any advantage in using a restored copy of the profile folder, albeit 4
    >> > weeks
    >> > old, over the one sitting on my HD now but with the Ntuser data
    >> > corrupted.
    >> > The restored version would probably work for log on right away,
    >> > assuming
    >> > that
    >> > I restore the directory names to their original format, as it was
    >> > created
    >> > before my ill-advised directory name change. But, if I want a
    >> > nonrevealing
    >> > directory structure, I would have to create a new account with the
    >> > desired
    >> > name to launch the new directory structure and then copy exisitng
    >> > (backup
    >> > or
    >> > current) configuration and application data into the new directory. I
    >> > guess
    >> > it's crucial to know if the Ntuser files are the only corrupted part of
    >> > the
    >> > current folder. As I changed the name of the user account to the
    >> > nickname
    >> > before changing the directory folder(s) name(s), this is how I planned
    >> > to
    >> > proceed, logging on as Administrator.
    >> >
    >> > 1. Rename the existing account to the longer, full name version.
    >> > 2. Create a new user account with the desired nickname as its name.
    >> > 3. Copy exisitng user account data to the new account --
    >> > **this is where I need to know whether it would be better to use a
    >> > restored
    >> > copy or the current folder. In either case I will need to ensure
    >> > Outlook data
    >> > is imported from the most current folder.
    >> > 4. Log off and log on as the new user.
    >> > 5. Import, if it didn't come accross with the "copy and paste", any
    >> > Outlook
    >> > data
    >> > files. I don't use Outlook Express.
    >> >
    >> > Are there any other "imports" which need to be done?
    >> >
    >> > I couldn't agree more with your emphasis on regular backups. A number
    >> > of
    >> > authors have recommended a second HD for this purpose, together with
    >> > remotely
    >> > stored archived copies, of course, and that is the course I took.
    >> >
    >> > I would like to use my favorite "restoration" app, GoBack Deluxe,
    >> > because
    >> > it
    >> > has several advantages over the WXP utility. With GoBack, you can
    >> > specify
    >> > the size and exact location of the restore database (WXP puts restore
    >> > "points" on every partition of every drive), and every file on the PC
    >> > is
    >> > included (WXP focuses on "system" files as I understand it). Of course
    >> > backups are needed in case of HD failure or to selectively restore
    >> > individual
    >> > files and/or file versions. This always worked well for me, being much
    >> > easier than restoring from backup. However, I recently followed
    >> > recommendations in the Resource Kit and installed the Recovery Console
    >> > at
    >> > the
    >> > root of my system drive. Unfortunately, GoBack has some effect on the
    >> > MBR,
    >> > blocking access, so it seems to make it impossible to boot into the
    >> > Recovery
    >> > Console. I get a message that the Console cannot access "KBDUS.DLL"
    >> > and
    >> > am
    >> > told to restart the computer. I was wondering whether there is
    >> > anything I
    >> > can do to get around this. Currently, the Recovery Console is on the
    >> > box
    >> > and
    >> > working well, but GoBack is uninstalled.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks again for your help!
    >> >
    >> > Ken Grush
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> You're welcome, Ken.
    >> >>
    >> >> Sorry if I was a bit cryptic with regard to backups. Having once lost
    >> >> three
    >> >> hard drives in one year I'm fanatical on the subject to say the
    >> >> least.<G>
    >> >>
    >> >> Completely understandable abut your backup situation and I'm sure this
    >> >> recent issue was a bit of a lesson to you if not reinforcement of
    >> >> something
    >> >> you clearly know, the importance of good, up to date backups.
    >> >>
    >> >> I'm glad the article was able to help, it often does in situations
    >> >> such
    >> >> as
    >> >> this. I also want to make clear, these newsgroups are peer to peer
    >> >> and
    >> >> sometimes such admonishments are as much for others who might read the
    >> >> thread as they are for those to whom we are responding directly.
    >> >>
    >> >> Good luck.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> >> Windows Shell/User
    >> >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >> >>
    >> >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> >> news:614901C4-3F3A-4471-96FA-F61F2B22B6DE@microsoft.com...
    >> >> > Thank you so much for your sage advice, Michael! I actually do have
    >> >> > regular
    >> >> > unattended backups to a second HD, but because of a software glitch
    >> >> > involving
    >> >> > repeated full rather than the ordered incremental images, I had just
    >> >> > been
    >> >> > forced to prune several of the oldest and recreating to backup
    >> >> > script.
    >> >> > I
    >> >> > do
    >> >> > have a separate full system backups archived, but from a month ago.
    >> >> > however,
    >> >> > if I restore that version, I'll lose Outlook rules, etc. dating from
    >> >> > that
    >> >> > date and have to copy or import them from the existing account
    >> >> > anyway.
    >> >> > The
    >> >> > article you recommended was excellent! In creating a brand new
    >> >> > account
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > the desired name (something I would have to do anyway eventually),
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > recommended procedure will then allow me to copy configuration
    >> >> > settings
    >> >> > from
    >> >> > the old account and import Outlook data. The crucial information
    >> >> > was
    >> >> > which
    >> >> > files from the old profile NOT TO COPY, which, after reading the
    >> >> > article
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > other resources, I now know to be the corrupted components of my
    >> >> > original
    >> >> > profile. Thanks again for the great information and friendly
    >> >> > advice!
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Ken Grush
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> The best way to rescue your data is from a backup and since that
    >> >> >> data
    >> >> >> is
    >> >> >> quite important to you, in the future I suggest you start backing
    >> >> >> up
    >> >> >> and
    >> >> >> fairly regularly given the chances you seem to take.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> That said, try treating this as a corrupt user account as
    >> >> >> instructed
    >> >> >> in
    >> >> >> the
    >> >> >> following Knowledge Base Article:
    >> >> >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q318011
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> --
    >> >> >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> >> >> Windows Shell/User
    >> >> >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> >> >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> "KenG" <KenG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> >> >> news:94D06159-32BA-47BA-AD7C-34B4C1107904@microsoft.com...
    >> >> >> > When I installed WXP, SP2, I initially gave my full name in
    >> >> >> > setting
    >> >> >> > up
    >> >> >> > my
    >> >> >> > account, but then changed my account type from "Administrator" to
    >> >> >> > "Power
    >> >> >> > User" and shortened the account name to my nickname. I then
    >> >> >> > created
    >> >> >> > another
    >> >> >> > "Power User" account for the other user on the PC, initially
    >> >> >> > giving
    >> >> >> > his
    >> >> >> > full
    >> >> >> > name as well but then shortening it to his nickname. I then
    >> >> >> > renamed
    >> >> >> > the
    >> >> >> > "PCname/Administrator" account to disguise it. I created
    >> >> >> > passwords
    >> >> >> > for
    >> >> >> > all
    >> >> >> > three of the accounts. Everything worked fine, except that the
    >> >> >> > directory
    >> >> >> > structure under "Documents and Settings" for all accounts EXCEPT
    >> >> >> > MY
    >> >> >> > INITIAL
    >> >> >> > ONE showed the correct new name. My own account persisted in
    >> >> >> > showing
    >> >> >> > my
    >> >> >> > full
    >> >> >> > name, which seemd to revealing to me. I tried a number of times
    >> >> >> > to
    >> >> >> > change
    >> >> >> > the name without success: twice "denied access" and once seemed
    >> >> >> > to
    >> >> >> > take
    >> >> >> > the
    >> >> >> > change, but then reverted to the original full name with reboot.
    >> >> >> > Finally,
    >> >> >> > just recently, the system allowed me to rename the relevant
    >> >> >> > folders,
    >> >> >> > the
    >> >> >> > change persisted, but, as I should have known, the original
    >> >> >> > profile
    >> >> >> > is
    >> >> >> > now
    >> >> >> > inaccessible.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > When I try to log on as myself, the system creates a new
    >> >> >> > "Documents
    >> >> >> > and
    >> >> >> > Settings" user directory with the name "me(current account
    >> >> >> > name)/PCname",
    >> >> >> > but
    >> >> >> > without ANY OF MY CONFIGURATIONS, even trying to set up Outlook,
    >> >> >> > etc.
    >> >> >> > from
    >> >> >> > scratch. The old (full name) folder structure remains. I tried,
    >> >> >> > under
    >> >> >> > "Computer Management" > "Local Users and Groups" > "Users" > "My
    >> >> >> > account"
    >> >> >> >>right click, "Properties" > "Profile" to set the home folder to
    >> >> >> >>the
    >> >> >> >>old
    >> >> >> > (original) one, but it doesn't seem to help. i also changed all
    >> >> >> > of
    >> >> >> > the
    >> >> >> > name
    >> >> >> > revisions in the original subdirectory back to their original
    >> >> >> > format,
    >> >> >> > again
    >> >> >> > without success.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Can someone please tell me how to rescue all 256 MB of my user
    >> >> >> > data?
    >> >> >> > PLEASE!!
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
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