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Is My CPU Gone?

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 6:33:14 PM

I have a computer that hasn't worked in about a couple years. Originally the computer just shut down and wouldn't reboot. It would start up for a second but then it would restart every 5 seconds or so. So I had a shop look at it and they told me my motherboard was bad. So I got a new motherboard of the same model. The new motherboard would power up but would not post. It did not, however, continually restart like the old motherboard. I figured when the old motherboard went bad it may have taken the processor with it, so I bought a new processor. Still no luck. The motherboard was an Asus P5NSLI. The original processor was an Intel Pentium D 805. The replacement motherboard was also a P5NSLI, and the replacement processor was an Intel Core 2 Duo E8400. So the computer sat for a year or so not working, until the other day I took it to a shop to have it looked at again. They told me the motherboard was bad (this is the new motherboard, which has never been booted up a single time) and that the cpu had visible burn marks on it. They then offered to sell me a new computer that was a little slower than my 805 for $600. I declined, and decided to look at the processor. I cannot for the life of me see any burn marks on my cpu, but then again I'm not 100% sure I know what I'm looking for. I scanned the E8400 and couldn't find any burn marks on it either. Would I be able to see if my cpu was burned? Is there any way to test it? I bought a new motherboard, not an Asus this time, and would like to know if putting the E8400 in it is going to destroy the new board. Keep in mind the E8400 has NEVER been booted up. Never even been attempted for more than a few seconds at a time. Thanks for your time, and I appreciate any help.

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a b à CPUs
June 3, 2010 6:37:48 PM

A bad processor should not hurt your motherboard. A bad motherboard might hurt your processor, though.
I assume the shops you went to did proper testing--ie, testing each component in another system. It sounds to me like you might have a bad power supply. This could fry the motherboard and/or the processor.

I'd recommend using a new power supply and case. You can also check the new system build forum--there's a sticky about boot problems for new systems. It offers pretty good advice for diagnosing hardware issues.

And, on "visible burn marks" .. I would assume that visible means visible, unless the shop managed to clean them off when they cleaned the CPU and reapplied thermal paste.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 6:49:36 PM

I should elaborate a little. The problem with the first motherboard is that when I installed it, I accidentally placed one of the brass mounting screws in the wrong location. Over time it rubbed a gouge into the motherboard. The second motherboard does not have that same problem. But after investigating, the P-series Asus motherboards were notorious for not posting due to defective Bios chips. So I'm hoping I have two motherboards with different problems.

I have used several different power supplies, and will be using a new one with the new board. I have no idea what testing methods the shop used, but they did not mention the power supply being bad. They told me my Video card was fine, RAM was fine, HDD was fine, DVD-ROM was fine, my MB was bad, and my processor had burn marks.

As for the visible burn marks, I just don't know where to look. Would they be on the silver back part of the CPU, or the little gold circles on the front? Or would they be in the little plastic transitor-looking things on the front? I can't see any anywhere but maybe I need a magnifying glass or something. Also, they didn't reapply thermal paste. Nor did they re-seat my heatsink.
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a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 6:52:50 PM

yeah, taking a PC to a local place or even Best Buy or Comp USA usually leads to some retard trying to sell you a new PC with little explanation on why your PC is dead.

Get a new power supply from a decent brand, 400w or more. Good brands are Corsair, Seasonic, Antec earthwatts. test with the new power supply.

I find it hard to believe that two motherboards and two CPU's are bad...
Anonymous
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a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 7:44:22 PM

I just tested the power supply and here are the results. All the 3.3v orange wires were at 3.33v. All the 5.0v red wires were at 5.07v. The two 12v yellow wires were at 12.03v. And the -12v blue wire was at -11.23v. I checked with the ATX tolerances and all these voltages are well within tolerances. By the way, the power supply used was an Antec 450w that was only used for about a year before all this happened.

I also just tested the only other power supply I have, because I can't remember for sure whether or not I ever used it with this computer. It is an off-brand 550w power supply. The measurements were as follows: 3.3v wires were measured at 3.41. 5.0v wires were measured at 5.22. 12v wires were measured at 12.02. -12v wire was measured at -11.18. And the 5.0v standby was measured at 5.11. Some of these were a little further away from perfect than the Antec power supply, but all measurements were once again within ATX tolerance levels. So I really don't think it was the power supply...

Is it possible to test my cpu with a multimeter? Perhaps testing resistance? I read a way to do this with an AMD cpu, but I can't find anything for an Intel.
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 8:19:25 PM

well then, based on your elaborating and PSU results, it looks as if you may have genuinely had some bad luck with either both motherboards, both CPU's or both of both. Still, seems a little fishy to me, LOL

Were you using a stock heatsink/fan or aftermarket? It's rare but the CPU may have fried due to temp issues...
Anonymous
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a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 8:39:50 PM

I was using the stock Intel heatsink. Honestly I don't care if the Pentium D and both motherboards are garbage. I only hope the E8400 is ok so I can use it in the new motherboard I have being delivered tomorrow. And if it's not OK, I really don't want to stick it in the new board and fry the new mb.

I just wish I could get someone who had the capability to test my CPU's independently to do so.

I hate to keep adding to my own post, but I just had an idea. If I'm correct, a motherboard won't POST if it doesn't have a working CPU. Perhaps my first motherboard short circuited due to the misplaced screw, which damaged the first CPU. I then got the second motherboard, and inserted the first CPU. It would not POST, which could have been caused by the CPU being inoperable. I then replaced the cpu with an E8400, which I just checked, and is not supported by that motherboard. (At the time I read that it was, or perhaps I misread a chart.) The new motherboard then refused to POST, because it did not recognize the new processor. Does this sound like a possible scenario?
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2010 3:47:03 PM

That does indeed sound like a possible scenario. You may have read that your motherboard supported the E8400 and it might have but i think it would need a BIOS update before it does actually support the E8400, so that may have been the case but just to be sure, what is the new motherboard that you ordered?
Anonymous
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a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2010 7:21:02 PM

The new motherboard (which was SUPPOSED to get here today had UPS not screwed up and sent it to Chicago instead of Knoxville, TN) is an XFX. Here's a link to it: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/ite...
I wanted to be able to reuse all my other components, mainly video cards. I had two video cards, that are a little outdated but still work fine, and 4gb of RAM. Unfortunately, once again I didn't read and my DDR2 isn't supported by the new board, so there's yet another expense. What do ya think of it?
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2010 8:27:22 PM

might want to send it back, there is no real reason to use DDR3 RAM on an LGA 775 platform. Unless you plan on going to a Core i5 platform soon, then that would justify buying DDR3 RAM, otherwise you will have to buy DDR3 RAM for that motherboard, everything else will work.

What type of video cards do you have, ATI or Nvidia?
Anonymous
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a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2010 9:10:54 PM

Can't send it back. I'd rather just pay the extra $100 for new RAM. And I'm definitely not switching over to i5, I haven't even gotten this motherboard delivered yet, I don't want to buy a new one already :) 

Out of curiosity why do you say there's no reason to use DDR3 on an LGA775 platform? I understand that it's not going to be as fast as the newer stuff, but isn't a 1333 bus speed the same whether it's on the LGA775 platform or whatever the i5 uses?

The video cards are Nvidia. EVGA GT7600 KO's. Once again, I realize they are slow by today's standards but I'm really just trying to get a working computer for minimal costs, not an ultimate gaming machine.

EDIT: I called Tiger Direct and it seems I can send it back. So now it seems that my options are either to send this board back and buy a 775 DDR2 board, or keep this board and buy DDR3 RAM. Gotta decide by Monday what I want to do.
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