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Stock cooler is useless?

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February 10, 2013 8:47:02 AM

i ran prime95 and i reached this temps
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/803/prime95temps.p...

i thought if i let the test go on the cpu may die cause the temps just kept going higher and higher

its @ stock and i never oc it
is that normal?

More about : stock cooler useless

a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 10, 2013 9:11:35 AM

That is kinda toasty for not being overclocked, consider one of these for CPU longevity.
a c 113 à CPUs
a c 168 K Overclocking
February 10, 2013 9:33:53 AM

To me that seems right for a stock cooler, if a bit hot but that may be due to a high ambient temperature.

If temps are a concern for you, getting an aftermarket heatsink like Ryan suggested would clear the problem up pretty quickly.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 10, 2013 9:44:44 AM

Dont run prime 95

No real application or game will ever stress a cpu any where near that much
February 10, 2013 10:30:23 AM

i see no reason to worry with those temperatures while running prime95 which drives your cpu 10-15 °C higher than any game or aplication would push your cpu.

i run http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=2585881 24/7 and even an hour of prime95 doesn't produce temps that throtle down my cpu.

this http://valid.canardpc.com/2658314 on the other hand produces temps that throttle down my cpu to +-4.5 ghz for 1-2 seconds once every minute or so when cores hit 105 °C. and i'm not comfortable with running that 24/7.

maybe i'm an idiot and a fool, but ivy's seem able to function happely with temps that would make any other CPU burn. and ivy's clock down if they reach their max temp anyway. i have no idea how one could/can burn a 3570k without disabling every possible build in protection via bios, and most motherboards/bioses probably won't even allow you to disable those anyway.

80°C peaks on cores during half an hour of prime95 are nowhere near problematic imho.

but to answer your question, yes, stock coolers are not the best in the world, but even my clocks and voltages are done with 'an' air cooler.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 10, 2013 10:37:08 AM

Prome95 has no real purpose except to max out your cpu for testing. I would never buy an OC_able cpu without buying an after market cooler. As stated above - those temps are high but Ivy will run hot. The majority of semiconductor devices will run better/longer if temps are kept as cool as possible. Bottom line buy a 212 EVO and call it a day.
-Bruce
February 10, 2013 8:03:14 PM

well im thinking about buying swiftech h220
heres my pc spec
thermaltake chaser overseer
thermaltake smart 550w bronze
wd 500gb green sata2 64mb cache
no gpu
1 intake fromt 200mm fan
2 exhaust 120mm back and 200mm fan on the top
im thinking that i maybe need anoher intake? what you think guys? would it help?
im not planning to buy the swiftech untill like 5 months later on whereas the fan wont b a prob
i have a 200mm side optional and 120mm on bottom optional
a c 113 à CPUs
a c 168 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 2:53:20 AM

The H220 will fit in your case and is compatible with your mobo socket, so there's no reason you cant get one.

Would get the side 200mm, though I don't see much point in more airflow if you don't have a GPU.
February 12, 2013 9:27:18 AM

manofchalk said:
The H220 will fit in your case and is compatible with your mobo socket, so there's no reason you cant get one.

Would get the side 200mm, though I don't see much point in more airflow if you don't have a GPU.


im thinking it maybe help the cpu get clooer a bit? Or it wont help whatsoever
a c 113 à CPUs
a c 168 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 9:31:15 AM

It gets to a point where more airflow just doesnt make much of a difference to cooling performance. When the only thing really putting out heat is the CPU, the airflow you have is likely very sufficient.
Especially if your using a water cooler, as that is already exhausting the heat out of the case to begin with.
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 10:09:41 AM

lhikary said:
im thinking it maybe help the cpu get clooer a bit? Or it wont help whatsoever


The H220 will cool the CPU on it's on, the problem you need to address in replacing the stock air cooler with the H220 is you are removing the VR (Voltage Regulators), cooling, the air cooler is not only cooling the CPU but the surrounding VRs as well.

So you need to somehow replace the lost airflow over the VRs, or expect an extremely short motherboard life expectancy, many here at THGF make this mistake.
a c 113 à CPUs
a c 168 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 10:18:16 AM

Wouldn't the upward airflow to the dual rad and back 120mm provide enough airflow to deal with the VRM's?
The VRM heatsinks on most enthusiast boards would be enough to cool them semi-passively I would have thought.
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 2:35:17 PM

manofchalk said:
Wouldn't the upward airflow to the dual rad and back 120mm provide enough airflow to deal with the VRM's?
The VRM heatsinks on most enthusiast boards would be enough to cool them semi-passively I would have thought.


If the VRMs are nestled around the CPU socket then they're still designed to be air cooled, unless they're pre-tied into the water cooling setup.

Most everything is a take off of original design practices simply because they have no idea what cooling the consumer will actually be using so the old standby design setup is used and it is performance designed to utilize the cooling of stock CPU cooling.

Intel and AMD motherboards are designed exactly the same way.

When a 120 rad occupies the standard 120 exhaust setup on a case, the airflow is actually impeded by the radiator fins, so that airflow really does not cool the VRs down on the motherboard itself.

You have to make provisions to cool those voltage regulators, or suffer the consequences, wondering if what you're running is good enough and knowing it is, is two completely different things.

It's been a known fact since the early days of water cooling, that once the stock cooler is removed some cooling has to take it's place cooling the motherboard VRs, but today it seems to be completely disregarded.

Until the motherboards VRs overheat and fail and they cannot figure out why.

The CLC CPU coolers getting so popular today don't have fine print warnings regarding this?

They should have!

Isn't it covered in the water cooling sticky?

It should be!




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