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Connecting IDE HD to a SATA-Only Motherboard

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May 1, 2012 1:45:48 PM

Hi there,

I recently upgraded my machine to a mobo that only has SATA connectors, however I am a bit short on space and would like to run my 200gb IDE HD on this machine as my Program Files drive until SDD prices drop more.
Is there any way to get the drive's full speed performance through a converter or an adapter on my new mobo?

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a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
May 1, 2012 2:11:49 PM
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SATA to IDE adapters exist, but they are notoriously flaky. I've tried them several times, and never had a good experience (data becomes corrupted after weeks or even days).
If you really need the space, get a USB enclosure for the drive. Albeit it will be slower than IDE, it will be significantly more stable and usable.

If you can't afford an SSD right now, just get a standard SATA HDD - they're cheap enough.

Or if you can wait a couple/few weeks, SSD pricing is expected to dip some (google: "SSD price war". I expect this to be in full stride by the end of the month)
May 1, 2012 2:41:05 PM

What about a USB 3.0 enclosure?
Will I still notice a speed decrease from internal IDE?
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a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
May 1, 2012 2:48:34 PM

Slight decrease, because the enclosure is translating from IDE to USB. But USB3.0 is probably your best bet. However, I suspect you might struggle finding a IDE->USB3.0 enclosure. But if you can find it, get it. I suspect the more likely combination you will find is a IDE-> USB2. (Obviously USB*-> SATA being the most common combination)
May 1, 2012 5:40:40 PM

Best answer selected by afxwinter.
May 1, 2012 5:41:23 PM

Thanks so much psaus.
I'm going to temporarily use my external usb until the SSD prices stabilize and then grab a 240gb. :) 
a b G Storage
May 1, 2012 6:15:59 PM

@Afxwinter, you've mentioned you need your old drive as "Program Files drive". External USB enclosure won't let you to install Windows on it. You might, however, get a cheap PCI or PCIexpress IDE controller, and use your old disk as a system drive.
!