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Do I really need Intel Rapid Start, Smart Response, Smart Connect?

I'm currently building a new PC. I'm going to install Windows 7 and programs on a Crucial m4 128GB SSD, and keep all my videos, music, photos on a Hitachi 1TB HDD.

From what I know, these technologies use an SSD as a cache to improve the HDD performance (one way or another), is that correct? So if I'm using the SSD as my main OS + programs drive, then I wouldn't benefit from these technologies at all, correct? If so, I plan to NOT install their drivers, will that affect my setup? Thanks.
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  1. Best answer
    Smart Response is useless if you're booting off the SSD, which you should do.

    Smart Connect is not related to storage, and both it and Rapid Start are, I believe, both Ultrabook features.
    http://m.intel.com/content/intel-us/en/technology/smart-connect.touch.html
    It turns out that sleeping your computer uses roughly the same amount of power as shutting it down, so Rapid Start would be irrelevant on a desktop even if it were a desktop feature. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-protection-calculate-consumption,3066-4.html
  2. teiji said:
    I'm currently building a new PC. I'm going to install Windows 7 and programs on a Crucial m4 128GB SSD, and keep all my videos, music, photos on a Hitachi 1TB HDD.


    Good plan.

    Quote:
    From what I know, these technologies use an SSD as a cache to improve the HDD performance (one way or another), is that correct? So if I'm using the SSD as my main OS + programs drive, then I wouldn't benefit from these technologies at all, correct? If so, I plan to NOT install their drivers, will that affect my setup? Thanks.


    Intel SRT (Smart Response Technology) is used to improve the performance of a HDD with an Operating System installed on it by using a small (64GB and less) SSD as a cache drive. Since you will be installing your O/S on your SSD you can disregard SRT.

    You should still install the latest Intel RST (Rapid Storage Technology) drivers even though you won't be using the SRT feature.
  3. Best answer selected by Teiji.
  4. Thanks both kajabla and Dereck47 for the fast response.
  5. Rapid Start technology is a faster hibernate feature. Putting your computer in Sleep/Standby consumes lot a power (it is no where close to shutdown/hibernate) as the DRAM needs to be kept powered along with other wake HW.

    Intel Rapid Start allows the system to enter hibernate or even zero power state while providing a very fast (few second) resume. For desktop this means greener computer that is not sucking power when not in use and still availalbe for use within a few seconds. Therefore, this feature is very relevant to desktops; that is if you want to save your energy bill without having to shutdown/boot your system.
  6. Please click on my link above, which has hard data that shows that full sleep, RAM sleep, uses about one watt more than full shutdown, ~8W to shutdown's ~7W. Read posts before you contradict them.
  7. kajabla said:
    Please click on my link above, which has hard data that shows that full sleep, RAM sleep, uses about one watt more than full shutdown, ~8W to shutdown's ~7W. Read posts before you contradict them.


    What techman_98 said is right. One thing you need to know, Intel Rapid Start Technology is different from normal Sleep/Standy.

    "Intel® Rapid Start Technology transitions a system that is in Sleep or Standby, an S3 power state that keeps memory and other components powered, to a hardware power state that does not do so, an S4 power state. Refer to manufacturer’s specifications for system specific information."
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/responsiveness-technologies.html
  8. tango134 said:
    kajabla said:
    Please click on my link above, which has hard data that shows that full sleep, RAM sleep, uses about one watt more than full shutdown, ~8W to shutdown's ~7W. Read posts before you contradict them.


    What techman_98 said is right. One thing you need to know, Intel Rapid Start Technology is different from normal Sleep/Standy.

    "Intel® Rapid Start Technology transitions a system that is in Sleep or Standby, an S3 power state that keeps memory and other components powered, to a hardware power state that does not do so, an S4 power state. Refer to manufacturer’s specifications for system specific information."
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/responsiveness-technologies.html



    So kajabla was right; the difference between sleep and the new Rapid Start Technology state is the one between S3 and S4, as you say, and it is just 0.001KW of difference; around $1 a year.

    From the article he linked, the data exposed:
    PC/Display Power: 0.008 KW avg. while in ACPI S3 Sleep
    PC/Display Power: 0.007 KW avg. while in ACPI S4 Sleep

    But it's still worth it to use it, of course. We are millions of users so 1W x millions is a lot of energy.
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