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Do I really need Intel Rapid Start, Smart Response, Smart Connect?

Last response: in Storage
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May 2, 2012 11:46:16 PM

I'm currently building a new PC. I'm going to install Windows 7 and programs on a Crucial m4 128GB SSD, and keep all my videos, music, photos on a Hitachi 1TB HDD.

From what I know, these technologies use an SSD as a cache to improve the HDD performance (one way or another), is that correct? So if I'm using the SSD as my main OS + programs drive, then I wouldn't benefit from these technologies at all, correct? If so, I plan to NOT install their drivers, will that affect my setup? Thanks.

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a b G Storage
May 3, 2012 12:04:07 AM

Smart Response is useless if you're booting off the SSD, which you should do.

Smart Connect is not related to storage, and both it and Rapid Start are, I believe, both Ultrabook features.
http://m.intel.com/content/intel-us/en/technology/smart...
It turns out that sleeping your computer uses roughly the same amount of power as shutting it down, so Rapid Start would be irrelevant on a desktop even if it were a desktop feature. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-protec...
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a c 542 G Storage
May 3, 2012 12:09:23 AM

teiji said:
I'm currently building a new PC. I'm going to install Windows 7 and programs on a Crucial m4 128GB SSD, and keep all my videos, music, photos on a Hitachi 1TB HDD.


Good plan.

From what I know, these technologies use an SSD as a cache to improve the HDD performance (one way or another), is that correct? So if I'm using the SSD as my main OS + programs drive, then I wouldn't benefit from these technologies at all, correct? If so, I plan to NOT install their drivers, will that affect my setup? Thanks. said:
From what I know, these technologies use an SSD as a cache to improve the HDD performance (one way or another), is that correct? So if I'm using the SSD as my main OS + programs drive, then I wouldn't benefit from these technologies at all, correct? If so, I plan to NOT install their drivers, will that affect my setup? Thanks.


Intel SRT (Smart Response Technology) is used to improve the performance of a HDD with an Operating System installed on it by using a small (64GB and less) SSD as a cache drive. Since you will be installing your O/S on your SSD you can disregard SRT.

You should still install the latest Intel RST (Rapid Storage Technology) drivers even though you won't be using the SRT feature.
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May 3, 2012 2:52:20 AM

Best answer selected by Teiji.
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May 3, 2012 2:52:23 AM

Thanks both kajabla and Dereck47 for the fast response.
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May 10, 2012 7:16:55 AM

Rapid Start technology is a faster hibernate feature. Putting your computer in Sleep/Standby consumes lot a power (it is no where close to shutdown/hibernate) as the DRAM needs to be kept powered along with other wake HW.

Intel Rapid Start allows the system to enter hibernate or even zero power state while providing a very fast (few second) resume. For desktop this means greener computer that is not sucking power when not in use and still availalbe for use within a few seconds. Therefore, this feature is very relevant to desktops; that is if you want to save your energy bill without having to shutdown/boot your system.
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a b G Storage
May 10, 2012 11:07:33 PM

Please click on my link above, which has hard data that shows that full sleep, RAM sleep, uses about one watt more than full shutdown, ~8W to shutdown's ~7W. Read posts before you contradict them.
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August 16, 2012 4:48:59 AM

kajabla said:
Please click on my link above, which has hard data that shows that full sleep, RAM sleep, uses about one watt more than full shutdown, ~8W to shutdown's ~7W. Read posts before you contradict them.


What techman_98 said is right. One thing you need to know, Intel Rapid Start Technology is different from normal Sleep/Standy.

"Intel® Rapid Start Technology transitions a system that is in Sleep or Standby, an S3 power state that keeps memory and other components powered, to a hardware power state that does not do so, an S4 power state. Refer to manufacturer’s specifications for system specific information."
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and...
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