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How to set or configure DDR3 Corsair to use 1600

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December 5, 2010 7:58:10 PM

I installed or upgrade to 8GB and run Mem Test and everything is ok. Now spec is showing pc3 8500, my stick are 1600. I would like to know how can I set it to manufacture. I'll appreciated any help.

a c 128 } Memory
December 5, 2010 9:41:28 PM

Depends on your motherboard bios. Change the memory setting from auto to manual. Then if your default setting is 1066, use 1600; if it's 533, use 800. With some boards, the setting is half the actual ram speed. If 1333 is your top setting, look for a ram configurator setting that will overclock automatically, or increase your cpu speed by about 25%, and see how stable it is. For more help, list your make and model number. If it's an oem motherboard by dell, hp, etc, then you may have no options in the bios for changing the ram.
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a b } Memory
December 6, 2010 3:00:51 AM

mantech said:
I installed or upgrade to 8GB and run Mem Test and everything is ok. Now spec is showing pc3 8500, my stick are 1600. I would like to know how can I set it to manufacture. I'll appreciated any help.

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I see o1die is dispensing good advice as usual. There are a few tricks I think you should know about, however:

1.) Most DDR3-1600 is rated at an overclock. I see hundreds of posts that a "motherboard detected the wrong memory speed" when in actually it detected the RIGHT memory speed, but the memory is programmed slower-than-advertised. So, you need to know a little about overclocking to get the memory to its rated overclock value.

2.) Some processors won't allow DDR3-1600. This includes some quad-core Core i5 and some AMD models. Also ome older boards with chipset-based memory controllers don't support the proper ratio to reach DDR3-1600 on low-FSB processors.
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December 6, 2010 4:32:43 PM

Crashman said:
I see o1die is dispensing good advice as usual. There are a few tricks I think you should know about, however:

1.) Most DDR3-1600 is rated at an overclock. I see hundreds of posts that a "motherboard detected the wrong memory speed" when in actually it detected the RIGHT memory speed, but the memory is programmed slower-than-advertised. So, you need to know a little about overclocking to get the memory to its rated overclock value.

2.) Some processors won't allow DDR3-1600. This includes some quad-core Core i5 and some AMD models. Also ome older boards with chipset-based memory controllers don't support the proper ratio to reach DDR3-1600 on low-FSB processors.

Thanks for sharing. I didn't know some processor, even i5 don't support DDR3 1600 memory spec. I will do some research on that. It's interesting, my previous DDR3 Memory also rated at ddr3 1600 and my motherboard rated it 8500. My pc is custom made by myself is a Gigabyte UD4P P55 with an Intel Core i5 750 processor and GTX 260 Palit.
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a b } Memory
December 6, 2010 6:30:45 PM

mantech said:
Thanks for sharing. I didn't know some processor, even i5 don't support DDR3 1600 memory spec. I will do some research on that. It's interesting, my previous DDR3 Memory also rated at ddr3 1600 and my motherboard rated it 8500. My pc is custom made by myself is a Gigabyte UD4P P55 with an Intel Core i5 750 processor and GTX 260 Palit.
Ahah, OK, I have an i5-750 right here that won't support anything above DDR3-1333, the upper ratios are locked out on the CPU's built-in memory controller so the rest of the hardware doesn't make a difference.

If I use the 1333 ratio I can get 1600 by overclocking the CPU Base Clock to 160. Bonus, CPU goes from 2.66 GHz to 3.20 GHz when I do that.
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a b } Memory
December 6, 2010 6:49:20 PM

In short, you will have to OC your CPU to run the memory at 1600. The highest memory multiplier your CPU has is x10. Stock BClock which determines both your CPU core frequency and your memory frequency is 133 which gives you a stock memory speed of 1333. You'll need to OC to BClock 160 which will put the memory at 1600.
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a c 128 } Memory
December 6, 2010 7:59:52 PM

I did the same 160 setting for my i3; my board did this automatically when I enabled max fsb for 30 seconds, and enabled a similar setting for the ram. After rebooting about 4 times with a blank screen for 30 seconds, the post screen appeared and I re-entered the bios and disabled the max fsb setting, and the board locked in the 160 fsb cpu and 1600 for the gskill ddr3. It's a great way to overclock. Kuddos to msi for this bios feature.
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December 6, 2010 10:31:29 PM

Best answer selected by mantech.
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December 6, 2010 10:51:51 PM

Crashman said:
Ahah, OK, I have an i5-750 right here that won't support anything above DDR3-1333, the upper ratios are locked out on the CPU's built-in memory controller so the rest of the hardware doesn't make a difference.

If I use the 1333 ratio I can get 1600 by overclocking the CPU Base Clock to 160. Bonus, CPU goes from 2.66 GHz to 3.20 GHz when I do that.

Gigabyte has a bonus utility program, (Quick Boost- EasyTune6) it has 3 stages 1--2--3 quick boost. Stage 1 can be overclock up to 2.80, stage 2 upto 3.00 and stage 3 upto 3.20, In fact there's a few nifty utilities (@Bios utitility for flashing the bios by pressing the button. One can even update the bios from gigabyte server, from a file, can save current bios to File, just to name a few. Anyway thanks for your time. I am not a fan of overclocking cpu but I will think about it. Also I might upgrade this i5 for one that support hyperthreading. Is a shame i5 doesn't support 1600, because GA-UD4P-P55 support upto +2200.
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a b } Memory
December 6, 2010 11:25:58 PM

mantech said:
Is a shame i5 doesn't support 1600, because GA-UD4P-P55 support upto +2200.
Ah well, yes that's also an overclock rating :) 
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