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Replaced old mobo with Asus Sabertooth x58 and old cpu with Core i7 950, compute

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Anonymous
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December 8, 2010 8:03:24 PM

Hello,I recently replaced my computer's motherboard and cpu with a Sabertooth x58 motherboard and a core i7 950 cpu. When I attempt to boot, one component makes a clicking sound, the lights indicating CPU, DRAM, and PCIE2.0 component errors lights, all case lights turn on, and the case and cpu fans begin to turn.The computer then instantly shuts down less than a second after powering on. The motherboard LED indicating a flow of power reads green, and I made sure to connect all cpu/graphics card/mobo power cables as well as the wires for front panel controls. I suspect that it could be a PSU issue, but I am fairly sure that my PSU is able to support the demanded wattage. My specs are:

Intel Core i7 950
Asus Sabertooth x58 Motherboard
2x Ati Radeon Hd 4850 in crossfire
Xigmatek 650W PSU
4gb (2x2) OCZ Reaper HPC Series @ 1333Mhz

I was wondering if anyone could give me insight into what the problem might be?

Thanks
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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a c 717 V Motherboard
December 8, 2010 10:11:08 PM

Welcome to Tom's Forum! :) 

If you do absolutely NO OC'ing then 650W is the bare minimum, and then only it's a new PSU. Enter your info http://www.corsair.com/psufinder/default.aspx

I assume that you connected the 6-pin connectors to both GPUs, and the 8-pin & 24-pin to the MOBO. I assume the RAM is supported for the MOBO and was purchased as a set; while 2 sticks are supported - I do NOT recommend them, and would strongly recommend a Matched Tri Channel set.

Corsair RAM - http://www.corsair.com/configurator/product_results.asp...
My recommendation is the Corsair TR3X6G1600C8D - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



That said --
1. Clear CMOS

2. Psuedo Breadboard or Full Breadboard
A. The 'simple' method to rule-out a short is to unscrew ALL of the MOBO screws, and PCIe screws -> pull the MOBO away from the I/O shield and dangle use a towel to support.
B. If that fails the pull the second GPU {which I assume has its' CF bridge connected} and try again.
C. Next pull all but 1 Stick of RAM.
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Anonymous
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December 9, 2010 12:48:14 AM

Thank you for the welcome! so I tried clearing the CMOS, removing a leftover standoff from behind the mobocracy, and running with only one graphics card and dimm installed, but to no avail. I am still experiencing the same problem. do you think it is an issue of an insufficient power supply as I did, or something else? thanks.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 9, 2010 1:32:19 AM

If it is an old PSU then maybe. If you're in the US and/or have a computer store with a really good return policy then certainly you can try a NEW PSU.

What caught my attention is the 'leftover standoff'; Q - did it damage the MOBO?

At this point I would recommend a FULL breadboard which mean to take the MOBO out of the case and place it on a piece of cardboard - connect only the minimum. Initially: 1 GPU, 1 stick of RAM, no HDD or DVD, no Keyboard or Mouse - connect to a monitor and use a screwdriver to short the PW+ and PW- to start the PC. All we're tying to do is see if the rig will turn-on. Failure swap GPUs.

If it powers-up with CPU fan spinning then add the Keyboard.

Let me know before I add more 'IFs' to puzzle. The next IF it doesn't is to get proper RAM per my Corsair RAM link <or> use the OCZ configuration or the QVL memory per ASUS. Don't forget there's a Sabertooth 1156 MOBO.
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Anonymous
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December 9, 2010 10:45:18 PM

I certainly will try a full breadboard. Having attempted to power on with only one gpu and stick of ram, I am starting to doubt that it is an issue of wattage at all. do you still believe that a psu problem is possible? as to the mobo, I saw no physical damage to it from the standoff. do you have any other ideas of what the problem might be? the pus is only 2 years old. Thanks
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 10, 2010 2:28:31 AM

PSUs are too often taken for granted, and if your last system was running it to the limit then a PSU can fail in a year or less.

The breadboarding and if necessary a new PSU.

However, my thoughts are: Short/Ground {partial or otherwise}, Incompatible RAM - 2 bad GPUs seems very slim.

In addition, if you post your EXACT RAM or look up its CAS timings and voltage then manually enter those values in the BIOS.
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Anonymous
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December 10, 2010 8:51:51 PM

Ok, I just noticed that my exact RAM model is not on the list of supported products in the motherboard manual. The RAM is older than the motherboard, so there is most likely some sort of conflict that is affecting or will be affecting my computer. Is incompatible RAM enough to prevent the computer from even powering on?
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 11, 2010 12:01:02 PM

Incompatible or 'bad' RAM can cause post failure. If you post a link it would be helpful. There are (3) ways to check compatibly: 1. QVL MOBO list, 2. RAM Mfg's Tested list, and RAM Mfg Approval {via Ticket}. If you're 'mixing' RAM then only try (1) Stick of RAM.

Next, determine the RAM Speed, CAS Timings, and Voltage and enter those values in the BIOS. I generally recommend not using XMP setting, it is an all or nothing setting - Works or Failure - no middle ground.
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Anonymous
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December 12, 2010 5:12:49 PM

The RAM is OCZ3RPR13334GK (2x2GB). Upon further investigation it is neither on the list of supported RAM provided by the motherboard manufactuer. In addition, the RAM frequency (PC3 10666) is not suported by the motherboard (PC3 10600, PC3-8500, PC3-12800, PC3-14400 supported).


I probably did not make my self clear enough before, but I am not able to access the BIOS to change the timings/settings/voltage because the computer will not even turn on. It simply begins to turn on, lighting all the case LEDs, PSU LEDs, and lights on the motherboard indicating CPU, RAM, and GPU malfunctions. Within half a second of it turning on, it powers off again.

Could the incompatible RAM cause all this, or could I need a new PSU as well? I am somewhat skeptical of the latter, as the computer still would not run when I removed one DIMM and one graphics card, which should have greatly decreased the required wattage.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 12, 2010 5:37:15 PM

That's why I suggested 1 stick, often it will post. The Corsair RAM I posted above works very well with this MOBO. I cannot remember off the top of my head, but your MOBO may have a MEMOK button on the board - you can try it {generally doesn't help in these cases}.

I'd first get Certified or Tested RAM before replacing the PSU. While your PSU is on the small side it is adequate, but if it doesn't have an 8-pin for the CPU then yes replace it.

Incompatible or bad RAM can cause a post failure, same as any bad major component(s).

--

Q - Did you breadboard yet??
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Anonymous
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December 12, 2010 6:16:15 PM

The PSU only has a 4pin CPU connector to the MOBO. The MOBO does have a memOK switch, but as the computer can't turn on, it doesnt really do anything. So at this point do you suggest replacing both the PSU and the RAM as being the most appropriate course of action?


PS. No, I have not breadboarded yet, I will as soon as I can.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 12, 2010 7:03:25 PM

Yep, you do want an 8-pin PSU. I have 10 ASUS P6X58D-E and i7 930 {May 2010 build}, and won't ever think of running anything other than an 8-pin. Yeah, the RAM also; I recommend the Corsair Dominator TR3X6G1600C8D 8-8-8-24 1600MHz, I have 10 sets with zero problems.

As I first mentioned a short {dead or grounding} can easily screw you up. I am VERY cautious and silicone plastic washers on the standoffs and again between the screw and MOBO. I assume ALL standoffs match the holes {no extras underneath}. My lazy man's method as stated "A. The 'simple' method to rule-out a short is to unscrew ALL of the MOBO screws..."

I am the last one to have people jump through hoops needlessly. Also, most all of my builds I breadboard {bench actually} prior to installation. If I have a bad component(s) I haven't wasted much if any time; I water-block so imagine taking a few hours to block but to find out I had a dead CPU/MOBO/GPU etc... Every build is important. "Do it Right..."

Good Luck! :)  Let me know.
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Anonymous
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December 12, 2010 8:10:17 PM

Ok, I just took a look at my PSU (modular) and noticed there was a spot for using an 8pin cpu connector instead of a 4pin one. Could trying to find and using the 8pin cable work?
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Anonymous
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December 13, 2010 12:40:24 AM

I tried using the 8 pin but I still get the same problem.
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Anonymous
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December 13, 2010 12:45:35 AM

I have no idea what could be causing this. I've gone through every possible PSU problem. What is there left?
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 13, 2010 12:34:16 PM

As I first stated "Incompatible or 'bad' RAM can cause post failure...", Shorts, etc. Reread what I posted.

When it comes down to it MOBO & CPU or RAM unless you can replace one or the other it could be any one of those components. My first guess is the RAM and it get blurrier after that to determine good from bad -> breadboard and replace components.

If you're not in a situation with spare components then RMA it all or go to a shop where they can keep sticking in parts until it works. There's no magic to it. In your case you had 2 GPUs, in the shops case they have multiples of everything.
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Anonymous
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December 13, 2010 8:18:34 PM

OK, I'm going to replace the RAM, as it will definitely cause problems later on. In the meantime i'll breadboard like you said.
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Anonymous
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December 13, 2010 8:21:33 PM

Do you have any suggestions of 6gb tri channel memory that might be less expensive?
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Anonymous
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December 16, 2010 9:57:50 PM

Ok, I tried a full breadboard (without HDD/DVD Drive) and was able to boot up to the BIOS (albeit with error, as the memory is incompatible). Now I am certain that it is something in the case that is causing a short and not a PSU issue as I originally thought. In the meantime while the RAM ships, how should I proceed trying to identify what is causing the short?
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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a c 717 V Motherboard
December 17, 2010 1:19:46 PM

@eyeguy142 - Are you the original OP??

Short, not knowing your case - if the standoff's are not the 'screw-in' types and are the punched types then use electrical tape and punch a hole for the screws. I use silicone to secure a plastic washer on top of the standoffs and a second set to sandwich the MOBO from the screw. Also, ALL of the standoffs must match to the holes in the MOBO; remove the extras. Next the I/O shield - make certain that the folded metal {i.e bent incorrectly / alignment} isn't touching the MOBO.
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Anonymous
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December 18, 2010 1:36:52 AM

I am the OP, I just keep forgetting to follow the confirmation email. The case I use is the NZXT Tempest, and I have looked over the standoff positions, which are screw-in standoffs, and they all correspond with the positions of the screw holes in the motherboard. I just tried powering up with the I/O shield firmly attached, and was able to power up as well.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 18, 2010 11:46:45 AM

As I linked here before the CORSAIR DOMINATOR 6GB (3 x 2GB) DDR3 1600 TR3X6G1600C8D is my first choice.

Testing:


Stock:
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December 20, 2010 5:23:56 PM

Ok, I ordered new RAM, now what could be causing the short?
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
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December 21, 2010 1:52:47 PM

I already stated above "Short, not knowing your case - if the standoff's are not the 'screw-in' types and are the punched types then use electrical tape and punch a hole for the screws. I use silicone to secure a plastic washer on top of the standoffs and a second set to sandwich the MOBO from the screw. Also, ALL of the standoffs must match to the holes in the MOBO; remove the extras. Next the I/O shield - make certain that the folded metal {i.e bent incorrectly / alignment} isn't touching the MOBO."
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October 23, 2011 4:11:53 AM

Quote:
The RAM is OCZ3RPR13334GK (2x2GB). Upon further investigation it is neither on the list of supported RAM provided by the motherboard manufactuer. In addition, the RAM frequency (PC3 10666) is not suported by the motherboard (PC3 10600, PC3-8500, PC3-12800, PC3-14400 supported).


I probably did not make my self clear enough before, but I am not able to access the BIOS to change the timings/settings/voltage because the computer will not even turn on. It simply begins to turn on, lighting all the case LEDs, PSU LEDs, and lights on the motherboard indicating CPU, RAM, and GPU malfunctions. Within half a second of it turning on, it powers off again.

Could the incompatible RAM cause all this, or could I need a new PSU as well? I am somewhat skeptical of the latter, as the computer still would not run when I removed one DIMM and one graphics card, which should have greatly decreased the required wattage.


I just got the Asus X58 Sabertooth MB and it clearly states that DDR3 1066 is supported. It was one of the main reasons why I got this mobo because it supported 1066. I have 24 gigs of matched memory to move over to this new mobo and I am planning on installing Win 7 Prof to allow for support above 16 gbs. Unless this is a misprint I guess I am F'd.
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