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Thinking of Watercooling 3820 and 2x670s

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February 19, 2013 1:59:00 AM

I'm thinking about getting my feet wet, hur hur, with watercooling and was wondering what size radiator I'd need to sufficiently cool my 3820cpu and 670 Sli graphics set up. Also what kind of budget would we be talking about.

Current temps
Cpu at 4.4- 82C under load
cpu at 4.0 75C under load/ 40 idle
GPU1- 75C under load
GPU2- 82C under load

My biggest concern is cooling off my cpu- I'd like to run it all day at 4.5/4.6 without going over 70 or so when under load on prime95-, so if investing in a full loop proves too costly would picking up something like the h100i make sense?

Thanks!
a c 178 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 2:05:48 AM

I have an H100 on my 3960x and it doesn't even cool it properly at 4Ghz under IBT/Prime95 conditions. That's pulling over 230 watts though, I'm not sure what your 3820 is pulling.

I recently bought a full custom loop to replace the H100 but I haven't installed it yet. However, given my previous experience doing full-system loops with a QX9650 I'll recommend the following:

A single 360x120mm rad with 3 variable speed fans.

Half inch tubing all around

Swiftech MCP655 for a full system loop

High flow rate CPU block to go with the high pressure MCP655. I bought an Apogee HD.

Reservoir of at least 250-400ml.

This should cost about $400 but does not include GPU waterblocks. GPU waterblocks will add another $100-$150 each on average depending on how fancy you get. However, if your GPUs aren't overclocked, they don't need to be watercooled right away.
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a c 116 à CPUs
a c 175 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 2:16:14 AM

^ Gonna need more than a 360mm rad for a CPU and two 670's. Would say maybe dual 360's or equivalent.

My advice is too read the sticky, it will teach you a lot of the background knowledge needed to make a water loop. Chances are it will answer most of your questions.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...

Rough estimated cost for the loop, ~$450 including two GPU blocks. Though that's not including fittings, which can be a pretty expensive hidden cost when making a complex loop.
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February 19, 2013 2:39:58 AM

Yea I think the Swifttech h220 thats coming out soon might be my best bet. Can modify it later to handle the 670s. And at 140$ now. seems like a good deal.
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a c 116 à CPUs
a c 175 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 2:44:49 AM

Ehh...
There is some contention on whether the H220 is a viable long term solution if you upgrade it too include other components.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/282470-29-swiftech-h2...

Also remember that for $5 more you can get an XSPC Raystorm RS240 kit, which I say is a better option than the H220.
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February 19, 2013 1:05:34 PM

Thanks for the responses Mano! I just have a few questions if I can trouble you to answer them :) 

How beginner friendly is the Raystorm? (I'm not an idiot but I also don't particularly want to be fitting my own tubing 1st go around) You think this is clearly the better option if I plan to add 2 gpu blocks in the future? (what temp drops will i see approx? I'm at 82top/74 bottom atm Max)

How many additional components (2 gpu blocks and another 240 rad?) will I need to finish the loop? Will that loop be feasible in my 650d case? Are there any component manufacturers or product lines I should absolutely avoid?

Thanks!
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February 19, 2013 1:07:05 PM

O also to clarify I did thumb through the sticky twice, it just seems like their links to products and discussion of actual products is a tiny bit limited and outdated.
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a b à CPUs
a c 328 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 1:59:36 PM

You would have to fit your own tubing, but it's just cutting tubing and sliding it onto connectors. They don't pre-cut tubing because they don't know how you intend to route your components and where you mount them in your case.

It's very simple.

Quote:
O also to clarify I did thumb through the sticky twice, it just seems like their links to products and discussion of actual products is a tiny bit limited and outdated.


Please explain with specific examples.
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February 19, 2013 2:30:52 PM

rubix_1011 said:
You would have to fit your own tubing, but it's just cutting tubing and sliding it onto connectors. They don't pre-cut tubing because they don't know how you intend to route your components and where you mount them in your case.

It's very simple.

Quote:
O also to clarify I did thumb through the sticky twice, it just seems like their links to products and discussion of actual products is a tiny bit limited and outdated.


Please explain with specific examples.


For sure! let me pull it up right now. OK from a water cooling novice, yet overall intelligent human's, perspective,
1. Would be amazing if you showed a picture of a gpu block installed. It doesn't replace my air cooling solution on the gpu correct?
2. Pump wattage is apparently important spec but not listed when you give your pump overview (in the h220 thread a major point of it only being 6w is made- yet on the sticky i have no comparison wattages)
3. the Res and Barb/fitting section would benefit from some installation pictures. Or is everything basically G1/4 at this point?
4. picture of you jumping the PSU would be awesome, the paint image is nice, but putting a paper clip into anything electrical is slightly terrifying for me? Maybe I'm a wimp :) 
5. I think my university's wifi was just acting up on me, because from my apartment all the pages load fine, so I recant that criticism!
6. My last point would be I still have a very poor idea of the size and amount of radiators my case can hold. Obviously doing each available case is absurd, but maybe listing typical placements of radiators? I can fit a triple on the top of my case and then a single on my back exhaust fan I know, but are there any other placement options?


Back to the raystorm kit, the rs240 that has been suggested would be sufficient for only a cpu correct? 2 questuions; 1 will the pump be capable of handling additional radiators? and 2 Would I need a 360+120 to do the setup I intend- if so is there a point in getting a 240?


Thanks for all your help!
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a b à CPUs
a c 328 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 4:57:25 PM

Quote:
O also to clarify I did thumb through the sticky twice


You might want to go back and read through as much as possible to pick up as many details as possible. There are a large number of links, and most of those links also contain a large volume of data. Skimming isn't going to get you very far. That wasn't the idea of the sticky in the first place.

Quote:
1. Would be amazing if you showed a picture of a gpu block installed. It doesn't replace my air cooling solution on the gpu correct?

Yes, it does replace your normal air cooling. You must remove the stock cooler and install the GPU block (either universal + heatsinks or a full-cover block). Be sure to use new thermal paste and thermal pads/tape as appropriate for your install. These steps are included in GPU block packaging as there may be specific directions for individual blocks.
Quote:
2. Pump wattage is apparently important spec but not listed when you give your pump overview (in the h220 thread a major point of it only being 6w is made- yet on the sticky i have no comparison wattages)

Pump watts are almost always rated on the manufacturer site, but we rarely make a fuss as 99% of watercooling pumps consume less than 30w. This means at the very worst case scenario, they also dump 15-30w back into your loop. Not substantial, but almost everyone allows for a decent TDP headroom with radiators anyway.
Quote:
3. the Res and Barb/fitting section would benefit from some installation pictures. Or is everything basically G1/4 at this point?

You screw them in to finger tight, slide the tubing on. That's about it. For compression fittings, instead of applying a clamp over the tubing, you screw down the compression ring (which hopefully you slipped onto the tubing prior to fitting over the barb...)
Quote:
4. picture of you jumping the PSU would be awesome, the paint image is nice, but putting a paper clip into anything electrical is slightly terrifying for me? Maybe I'm a wimp

There is a picture of the sockets to jump. There isn't anything else to really show...? You can always buy an ATX jumper plug for a couple dollars at most watercooling stores.
Quote:
5. I think my university's wifi was just acting up on me, because from my apartment all the pages load fine, so I recant that criticism!

Can't help you much with your local ISP access. If I could, I would already have Google Fiber before the rest of the world. The End.
Quote:
6 My last point would be I still have a very poor idea of the size and amount of radiators my case can hold. Obviously doing each available case is absurd, but maybe listing typical placements of radiators? I can fit a triple on the top of my case and then a single on my back exhaust fan I know, but are there any other placement options?

This is where Googling your <case model> and watercooling can often turn up a lot of ideas. There are far too many cases and different versions out there to even remotely attempt this, but you can easily find a vast majority of the most common cases being modified for use as well as with stock fan/rad placement.

Planning and mapping out your components based on needs, budget and case are some of the most interesting and fun aspects of watercooling. More research and planning will lead to more ideas.

Too many people want cookie cutter answers and sadly miss many of the fun parts of this hobby.
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February 19, 2013 5:05:53 PM

Wow!, Thanks so much for the responses. I think this thread has about run its course. I think I'll hold off on the AIO cooler and wait till the summer to build a real loop since its looking like I'll need to drop ~400 to get all three components underwater.

I'll make a thread then with the parts I come up with for more specific feedback?

I didn't mean to come across as wanting a 1 size fit all answer, just trying to learn the ropes.

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a b à CPUs
a c 328 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 5:33:51 PM

No worries, just wanted to help, but also allow you to help yourself first. There is a lot of information out there and while only a small amount is really needed, the more you know and learn means the more you begin to see as an opportunity and idea. I started watercooling about 10 years ago simply because I wanted something that none of my friends had, but once that wore off, it became an addiction and I've watercooled every build I've done for myself since then.
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a c 116 à CPUs
a c 175 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 7:26:57 PM

The pump wattage is stressed in the H220 review because 6W on an All-In-One cooler is actually fairly beefy, up till now its largely been weak 2-3W pumps on things like the Corsair Hydro series.
However for a custom watercooling pump, it doesn't really matter as the performance is going to come down to its design rather than how much power it uses.
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