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What material to use for a kill coil

Hey all

Just wondering what i can use for a kill coil in my new water cooling loop to stop bacteria and algae, I have read that silver is good to use I was wondering would lead do the same job as it has a higher ion charge than silver, what do you think?
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  1. Best answer
    Hi,

    I would just opt for the kill coil to be honest, very cheap and known to work extremely well:
    http://www.specialtech.co.uk/spshop/customer/Pulse-Modding-999-Silver-Kill-Coil-pid-13036.html
  2. I agree, stick with silver.
    A more poisonous/ionic metal in the water wont make the bacteria any deader.
  3. Yeah its not so much my reasoning that it has a higher ion charge just i have a roll of lead in the shed by the time i buy the silver and p+p charges to ireland its costing 10 euro, i know it doesn't break the bank just like i said i have the lead if it does the same job i could use it
  4. How about chemical biocides? Killcoils are often debated as questionable when it comes to preventing microbial growth. Copper also has the same properties, just less per equivalent volume, but with the amount of copper in a loop vs. a killcoil, why wouldn't copper alone work just as well? However, copper alone does not really appear to prevent growth so there is argument that a killcoil alone likely wouldn't either. It's one of those tests that I'm wanting to run, but haven't really gotten around to it.

    Many local super box retailers will carry some sort of biocide to prevent unwanted growth, or you can also check at your friendly neighborhood pet store. Most watercooling sites also carry growth inhibitors, but if the few dollars for a killcoil is too much, these cost around the same.
  5. How about chemical biocides? Killcoils are often debated as questionable when it comes to preventing microbial growth. Copper also has the same properties, just less per equivalent volume, but with the amount of copper in a loop vs. a killcoil, why wouldn't copper alone work just as well? However, copper alone does not really appear to prevent growth so there is argument that a killcoil alone likely wouldn't either. It's one of those tests that I'm wanting to run, but haven't really gotten around to it.

    Many local super box retailers will carry some sort of biocide to prevent unwanted growth, or you can also check at your friendly neighborhood pet store. Most watercooling sites also carry growth inhibitors, but if the few dollars for a killcoil is too much, these cost around the same.
  6. The cost is not too much the best answer is probably to stick to the silver coil although you make a fair point rubix_1011 but if I got something from a pet store could it effect the cooling performance of the water when mixed
  7. Best answer selected by kiezz.
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