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Water blocks for gpu

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February 19, 2013 10:14:05 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ECuW

as of now this is my proposed build.

as there are three gpus so close together that will put out a lot of heat im worried about overheating. i was wondering what water blocks you would use, how many etc. also if i should get another radiator :/  (this is my first time water cooling)

as well any suggestions would be welcome. im pretty set on the 3 gpus and this will be used about 50% for graphic design

More about : water blocks gpu

a c 84 K Overclocking
February 19, 2013 11:19:38 PM

Since this is primarily a graphics design system, I'm going to suggest looking at professional caliber cards, aka, Workstation Graphics Cards (single card can do the work quickly, that's their purpose in life) such as the PNY VCQ4000-PB Quadro 4000 or the more pricy AMD 100 - 505633 FirePro W8000
Just a consideration, I was unable to find useful comparisons so I can't say what the performance difference is. I can tell you heat shouldn't be a problem with only one card in there though
Hope it helps
a c 168 K Overclocking
February 20, 2013 2:57:08 AM

^ That.
If your not gaming, there's no reason for a mainstream graphics card.

And yes, you will need a ton more radiator for that loop.
Have a look in the sticky and the TDP section, that will teach you how to calculate the loop TDP and give you the resources to find out if the radiators you have can handle it. I advise you read through the whole thing if you havent.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...

Also with the HAF-X, be wary of putting thick radiators at the top. Motherboard clearance is an issue with that case unless you drill some new mounting holes.
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a c 149 K Overclocking
February 20, 2013 6:23:05 AM

SLI doesn't help when it comes to graphic design. :) 
a c 76 K Overclocking
February 20, 2013 7:04:19 AM

It does. Just matters on the type of GPus you're using. As C12 mentioned, getting gaming grade cards to do render work (assuming graphics work encompasses PS, Adobe CS, Solid works and imagery editing software) then OP's best option would be to go the Quadro card route.

However he did mention 50% graphics duty, assuming the remaining is for gaming. In this scenario if OP is only going to use Adobe's CS then he's more than fine with the chosen parts.

Conversely, workstation grade cards are dismal gaming wise. So which route to take is a call you'll need to make.

Now, if you're going the Dedicated Workstation route you'd be happy to know that there are waterblocks available for a workstation grade card.
http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g30/c311/s792/list/p1/L...

more will be released in the future but for now, EK's the only one who make them + its not even nickel plated :) 

As a side note, why not just save upto the GTX Titan :)  ?

If you're yet hell bent on going sli with GTX 680's then:
http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g30/c311/s1631/list/p1/...

Manofchalk has already posted a very useful link. We all advise newcomers to go through it. Chock full of info :D 

on another side note, if radiator is internally mounted, the thick rads will be an issue. If they'll be mounted outside case then the cieling's the limit to your radiator space.

* If you're making a system for a (semi)professional layout/environment - might want to rethink your case. A gaming case doesn't fit-in in a studio environment :) 
!