How to Overclock.. Noob steps

Hi guys, i want to know exactly how to overclock my cpu.. first off what is the recommended OC on this chip? and secondly would you recommend someone who has never OC'd to do it?
is there a basic step-by-step method of doing it? or is it quite tricky?
Im a lil nervous since i have no idea where to even start and i want to do it perfectly!

I would like to know from guys who know this stuff like the back of their hand and know the correct way of doing it...
Thanks..

Im also thinking about OCing my GPU but that can come later... OR do you think i should OC my GPU first??? lol :D
I also know its different OC's on different Mobo's

Intel i5-3570K . 8GB-1600 G-Skill . AsRock Z77 Pro4 . Gigabyte GTX660Ti 2GB OC . 650W AsRock PSU . Dell 23" LED
8 answers Last reply
More about overclock noob steps
  1. What CPU cooler are you using?

    Start with your CPU for practice, its much easier.
    May I just add, do not go to far on that board, its not the most stable clocker.

    http://www.thinkcomputers.org/intel-ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide/

    OK there is a guide, its not really for beginners, so it boils down to...

    1. Disable all power saving adn turbo boost features and pick a load calibration, 1 being very stiff and one voltage constantly, 2 being a little more relax(easier to achieve stability), i prefer level 2.
    2. Set voltage to fixed at first and drop it to 0.9v.
    3. Boot into windows and run prime 95 or similar stresstest to test for stability for atleast half an hour. This will give you an idea of how sensitive your specific CPU is to voltage change.
    4. Increase your voltage to 1.2v and multiplyer to 4.2GHz. Test thoroughly for an hour. Keep a close eye on temps with real temp or HWmonitor.

    After that you can increase Multiplier one at a time testing for half an hour between each bump. When stability is lost, add 0.05v and try again.

    Repeat process until you reach your desired OC or unacceptable temps(drop one clock and/or Voltage) and viola you have your OC..
  2. Novuake said:
    What CPU cooler are you using?

    Start with your CPU for practice, its much easier.
    May I just add, do not go to far on that board, its not the most stable clocker.

    http://www.thinkcomputers.org/intel-ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide/

    OK there is a guide, its not really for beginners, so it boils down to...

    1. Disable all power saving adn turbo boost features and pick a load calibration, 1 being very stiff and one voltage constantly, 2 being a little more relax(easier to achieve stability), i prefer level 2.
    2. Set voltage to fixed at first and drop it to 0.9v.
    3. Boot into windows and run prime 95 or similar stresstest to test for stability for atleast half an hour. This will give you an idea of how sensitive your specific CPU is to voltage change.
    4. Increase your voltage to 1.2v and multiplyer to 4.2GHz. Test thoroughly for an hour. Keep a close eye on temps with real temp or HWmonitor.

    After that you can increase Multiplier one at a time testing for half an hour between each bump. When stability is lost, add 0.05v and try again.

    Repeat process until you reach your desired OC or unacceptable temps(drop one clock and/or Voltage) and viola you have your OC..

    Thanks for your reply.. i actually havnt been home yet to properly look at it but ill get back to you..
    so all in all, what are all the programs i would need to download.. The best recommended ones.. Thanks Novuake
  3. Novuake said:
    What CPU cooler are you using?

    Start with your CPU for practice, its much easier.
    May I just add, do not go to far on that board, its not the most stable clocker.

    http://www.thinkcomputers.org/intel-ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide/

    OK there is a guide, its not really for beginners, so it boils down to...

    1. Disable all power saving adn turbo boost features and pick a load calibration, 1 being very stiff and one voltage constantly, 2 being a little more relax(easier to achieve stability), i prefer level 2.
    2. Set voltage to fixed at first and drop it to 0.9v.
    3. Boot into windows and run prime 95 or similar stresstest to test for stability for atleast half an hour. This will give you an idea of how sensitive your specific CPU is to voltage change.
    4. Increase your voltage to 1.2v and multiplyer to 4.2GHz. Test thoroughly for an hour. Keep a close eye on temps with real temp or HWmonitor.

    After that you can increase Multiplier one at a time testing for half an hour between each bump. When stability is lost, add 0.05v and try again.

    Repeat process until you reach your desired OC or unacceptable temps(drop one clock and/or Voltage) and viola you have your OC..

    Thanks for your reply.. i actually havnt been home yet to properly look at it but ill get back to you..
    so all in all, what are all the programs i would need to download.. The best recommended ones.. Thanks Novuake
  4. Novuake has covered pretty much the right way to overlock.

    If something goes wrong, will need to understand how your computer will react. Most decent motherboards these days (yours included) will have safe guards placed to shutdown. Theres no danger in this, its what it is designed to do if the voltages are set too high or the Vram or North bridge (chip between cpu & memory) isn't cooperating with your overclock.

    Your motherboard might allow the ease just to power it on (after shutting down from an unstable overclock) and will reset to default automatically if the computer does shut down, but keep in mind the cmos battery (removing will reset to defaults) is located next to the cpu slot. Having a bigger heatsink compared to stock designed for overclocking could cause accessible issues there for the cmos battery (if the overclock goes wrong) so i would recommend looking at your manual to see if there are other means of clearing/defaulting bios settings.

    Look at your manual, find if there's a jumper switch or button you can use to reset cmos without removing the cmos battery, so you can move forward amend your overclock.

    Could always shortcut through and look for people on the net or youtube with the same board/similar builds and see what they've done (reasonably) to overclock. Learning from others is one thing, but starting from scratch can take a long time and plenty of patience. Just don't be too greedy with overclocking, 4ghz quite hitting the sweet spot.
  5. WrekCreation said:
    Thanks for your reply.. i actually havnt been home yet to properly look at it but ill get back to you..
    so all in all, what are all the programs i would need to download.. The best recommended ones.. Thanks Novuake


    The best way to do it is via the BIOS(press delete at startup), familiarize yourself with it first before starting.

    BUT you really need a decent CPU cooler to start.
  6. If you want to keep it simple, you can leave voltage to auto and just change the multiplier til it BSODs under load. At 4.1GHz mine never goes above 1.17V (usually hangs at 1.16V). I got it to 4.4 stable (can't remember the voltage at that point). 4.5 wouldn't work on auto and I wasn't interested in messing with it manually.
  7. i have the stock cooler of the 3570k... i mean it is meant to be OC'd and im only plaing on doing about 10%... i must admit.. im pretty lost with all the increasing of voltages ect.. is that in the bios or a specific program?
  8. WrekCreation said:
    i have the stock cooler of the 3570k... i mean it is meant to be OC'd and im only plaing on doing about 10%... i must admit.. im pretty lost with all the increasing of voltages ect.. is that in the bios or a specific program?


    Yes that is in the BIOS. You really need an aftermarket cooler before you increase voltage.
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