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Canon digital Rebel Lenses - Question

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Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello Group,
I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?


Thanks,

Bruce in alaska
--
add a <2> before @
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Nope,

FD lenses will not mount on the rebel, 10D, 20d, 1d, 1ds, etc. I suppose
you can try to find some kind of adaptor but I have never tried one.

If your collection of FD lenses is huge finding an adaptor might be
worth a try, otherwise........


(sorry)

Steve

Bruce in Alaska wrote:

> Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
> switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
> a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
> and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
> seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bruce in alaska
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 20:32:35 GMT, Bruce in Alaska <bruceg@btpost.net>
wrote:

>Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
>seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>

There are apparently "adapters" available, but they don't use the
"automatic" features... you have to use the FD lenses in "manual"
mode.

http://makeashorterlink.com/?O2A8131F9

I'm not sure if the same adapter would work on the 10D or 20D, but you
might want to consider one of them instead.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
a lot of good info.

Mike


"Bruce in Alaska" <bruceg@btpost.net> wrote in message
news:bruceg-988F55.11324504122004@netnews.worldnet.att.net...
> Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
> switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
> a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
> and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
> seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bruce in alaska
> --
> add a <2> before @
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
a lot of good info.

Mike


"Bruce in Alaska" <bruceg@btpost.net> wrote in message
news:bruceg-988F55.11324504122004@netnews.worldnet.att.net...
> Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
> switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
> a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
> and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
> seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bruce in alaska
> --
> add a <2> before @
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
a lot of good info.

Mike


"Bruce in Alaska" <bruceg@btpost.net> wrote in message
news:bruceg-988F55.11324504122004@netnews.worldnet.att.net...
> Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
> switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
> a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
> and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
> seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bruce in alaska
> --
> add a <2> before @
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 20:32:35 GMT, Bruce in Alaska <bruceg@btpost.net>
wrote:

>Hello Group,
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
>seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?

They are not the same, but if you are dead set on using the FD lenses,
I think there are some adaptors out there.
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

No, the digital Canons use EF (EOS) lenses.

Various adapters have existed to put FD lenses on EOS cameras, but they have
limitations. Some of them do not allow the lens to focus on infinity; that
is, they work as extension tubes. Others contain a small 1.1x
teleconverter, often of poor optical quality.

You can get Nikon-lens-to-EOS-body and M42-lens-to-EOS-body adapters that
focus on infinity and do not contain glass elements.

In any case, you don't get the benefits of autofocus unless you use an EOS
(EF) lens.

www.covingtoninnovations.com/dslr
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 1:47:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bruce wrote:
> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, ...

It may be possible to physically mount some FD lens onto the body, but it won't
work worth a damn. Canon EOS bodies use EF lenses that have autofocus. The D
Rebel also uses EF-S lenses.

I would suggest that if you have been a film photographer for years, you might
want to try the slightly more serious cousins of the D Rebel, namely the 10D
and 20D.

---Bob Gross---
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 2:12:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"YAG-ART" <right@here.now> wrote in message
news:nks4r0lbol2mj99vm4apc1iao9ejg63fk2@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 20:32:35 GMT, Bruce in Alaska <bruceg@btpost.net>
> wrote:
>
> >Hello Group,
> > I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
> >switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
> >a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
> >and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, which
> >seems to use the EF lenses? Are the mountings the same?
>
> They are not the same, but if you are dead set on using the FD lenses,
> I think there are some adaptors out there.

These adapters will pretty much make your year 2004 dSLR into effectively a
1972 digital Spotmatic or Practika. You lose all the features and metering
patterns of a modern camera and revert to a lump...
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 3:37:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

mike nelson wrote:
> With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
> you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
> functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
> a lot of good info.
>
> Mike
>

Sorry Mike - could you run that by me one more time?

Aerticeus

(I put it down to that earlier Egyptian experience)
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:06:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

mike nelson <mike_nelson@acm.org> wrote:
>With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
>you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
>functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
>a lot of good info.

>Mike

Yes, but manual focus of a Canon 300D (Rebel) is not easy.
The screen is not really set up for it, which is too bad.

---- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:08:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Robertwgross <robertwgross@cs.com> wrote:
>Bruce wrote:
>> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, ...
>
>It may be possible to physically mount some FD lens onto the body, but it won't
>work worth a damn. Canon EOS bodies use EF lenses that have autofocus. The D
>Rebel also uses EF-S lenses.

>I would suggest that if you have been a film photographer for years, you might
>want to try the slightly more serious cousins of the D Rebel, namely the 10D
>and 20D.

Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.

---- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 12:45:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 05:06:55 +0000 (UTC), Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com>
wrote:

>mike nelson <mike_nelson@acm.org> wrote:
>>With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
>>you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
>>functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
>>a lot of good info.
>
>>Mike
>
>Yes, but manual focus of a Canon 300D (Rebel) is not easy.
>The screen is not really set up for it, which is too bad.
>
> ---- Paul J. Gans

On my DR, I use the center focus pip (I know, wrong word) only.
When I switch the lens to manual focus, and press the shutter button
half down, that center pip will flash when the camera sees it as being
in focus. And it seems to do a pretty good job.

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 3:39:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Aerticulean Effort wrote:
> mike nelson wrote:
>
>> With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus
>> mode, and
>> you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
>> functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will
>> find
>> a lot of good info.
>>
>> Mike
>>
>
> Sorry Mike - could you run that by me one more time?
>
> Aerticeus
>
> (I put it down to that earlier Egyptian experience)

I am not mike, but here is my explanation:

The adapter provides a mechanical mount to attach the older lens to the
newer body and optics to retain infinity focus, but does not allow the
body to electricaly communicate with the lens.
The camera can't tell what actual apeture is set on the lens and
autofocus does not work.

Stop down metering is when the lens apeture is actualy at the required
f-stop while you are composing to allow the camera body (if set on auto)
to set the exposure.
The viewfinder looks dimmer than with an auto-apeture lens (which
comminicates the f-stop the the body via a linkage [electronic or
mechanical] and only closes the apeture down when the shutter is fired),
the camera can set the shutter speed based on the amount to light
hitting the sensor.

For example:
I can use Pentacon Six lenses with an adapter on my Minolta XG-2 and the
lens apeture is closed (or stopped) down all the time.
The camera meter still works, but on the smaller apetures (high f-stop
number), the viewfinder looks a bit dim.
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 5:07:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <cou54v$iam$2@reader1.panix.com>,
Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote:

>Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.

I've never used 300D, but the 20D screen is easier to focus with than
the 10D, IMO.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 11:17:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote in
news:cou54v$iam$2@reader1.panix.com:

> Robertwgross <robertwgross@cs.com> wrote:
>>Bruce wrote:
>>> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>>>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>>>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>>>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, ...
>>
>>It may be possible to physically mount some FD lens onto the body, but
>>it won't work worth a damn. Canon EOS bodies use EF lenses that have
>>autofocus. The D Rebel also uses EF-S lenses.
>
>>I would suggest that if you have been a film photographer for years,
>>you might want to try the slightly more serious cousins of the D
>>Rebel, namely the 10D and 20D.
>
> Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.

The 20D is the best of the line by far, but the age of autofocus has given
us no dSLRs with really good focusing screens.

There are two Canon models of magnifiers that help considerably, though.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:29:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:
>In message <cou54v$iam$2@reader1.panix.com>,
>Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote:

>>Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.

>I've never used 300D, but the 20D screen is easier to focus with than
>the 10D, IMO.
>--

<grin> But how easy was the 10D to focus?

I guess what I'd like to see is a prismatic ground glass
bit on the focussing screen of the sort that we used to
have on film SLR bodies. One could (usually) see the
object snap into focus.

If this can be done (and I don't see why not) I think
that it would add tremendous value to the camera with
little cost.

----- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:29:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>
> I guess what I'd like to see is a prismatic ground glass
> bit on the focussing screen of the sort that we used to
> have on film SLR bodies. One could (usually) see the
> object snap into focus.
>
> If this can be done (and I don't see why not) I think
> that it would add tremendous value to the camera with
> little cost.

Remember that microprisms don't work with lenses slower than f/4.

Also, whenever I'm focusing manually, I'm generally using some unusual
optical configuration with which a microprism wouldn't work.

I'd prefer a nice big, bright screen (a la Olympus OM-1 or Canon A-1) with a
plain matte surface (like Nikon's B screen).
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:38:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Big Bill <bill@pipping.com> wrote:
>On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 05:06:55 +0000 (UTC), Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com>
>wrote:

>>mike nelson <mike_nelson@acm.org> wrote:
>>>With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
>>>you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
>>>functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
>>>a lot of good info.
>>
>>>Mike
>>
>>Yes, but manual focus of a Canon 300D (Rebel) is not easy.
>>The screen is not really set up for it, which is too bad.
>>
>> ---- Paul J. Gans

>On my DR, I use the center focus pip (I know, wrong word) only.
>When I switch the lens to manual focus, and press the shutter button
>half down, that center pip will flash when the camera sees it as being
>in focus. And it seems to do a pretty good job.

That's great, but not quite the same.

In "real" manual focus the camera is not involved at
all. One does the focussing directly.

I've used the 300D autofocussing pretty heavily and
I'm not sure that I completely trust it. I can't tell
via the viewfinder if the picture really is in focus
or not.

I *used* to be able to do that with no trouble on a
film SLR.

No, it's not a major issue. But it can become one with
low contrast images. The human eye becomes better than
the camera under such circumstances.

And it should not be too hard for the manufacturers to
add a focussing screen (or a focussing segment) to the
viewfinder image. After all, they *used* to do that
all the time...

----- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:38:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 02:38:33 +0000 (UTC), Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com>
wrote:

>Big Bill <bill@pipping.com> wrote:
>>On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 05:06:55 +0000 (UTC), Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com>
>>wrote:
>
>>>mike nelson <mike_nelson@acm.org> wrote:
>>>>With a suitable adapter, you can use the FD lenses in manual focus mode, and
>>>>you will also have to resort to stop-down metering, as all automatic
>>>>functions will not work. Do a google search on FD to EOS and you will find
>>>>a lot of good info.
>>>
>>>>Mike
>>>
>>>Yes, but manual focus of a Canon 300D (Rebel) is not easy.
>>>The screen is not really set up for it, which is too bad.
>>>
>>> ---- Paul J. Gans
>
>>On my DR, I use the center focus pip (I know, wrong word) only.
>>When I switch the lens to manual focus, and press the shutter button
>>half down, that center pip will flash when the camera sees it as being
>>in focus. And it seems to do a pretty good job.
>
>That's great, but not quite the same.
>
>In "real" manual focus the camera is not involved at
>all. One does the focussing directly.
>
>I've used the 300D autofocussing pretty heavily and
>I'm not sure that I completely trust it. I can't tell
>via the viewfinder if the picture really is in focus
>or not.
>
>I *used* to be able to do that with no trouble on a
>film SLR.
>
>No, it's not a major issue. But it can become one with
>low contrast images. The human eye becomes better than
>the camera under such circumstances.
>
>And it should not be too hard for the manufacturers to
>add a focussing screen (or a focussing segment) to the
>viewfinder image. After all, they *used* to do that
>all the time...
>
> ----- Paul J. Gans

On my DR (300D) the autofocus is pretty good.
75-300 Canon zoom, at full 300mm, hand held, in a pine forest:
http://www.pippina.us/images/bird0.jpg
Closer crop:
http://www.pippina.us/images/bird1.jpg

At this kind of distance and contrast, the lens shows problems, but
the autofocus is pretty good!

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:50:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>I've used the 300D autofocussing pretty heavily and
>I'm not sure that I completely trust it. I can't tell
>via the viewfinder if the picture really is in focus
>or not.

If the autofocus isn't as good as manual focus, or if you have to
check the autofocus, get a new camera. There are lots of reasons to
use MF, but improving on the AF isn't one of them.

-Joel

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Please feed the 35mm lens/digicam databases: http://www.exc.com/photography
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Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:50:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Dr. Joel M. Hoffman" <joel@exc.com> wrote in message
news:W3Ptd.466$zp.351@fe11.lga...
> >I've used the 300D autofocussing pretty heavily and
>>I'm not sure that I completely trust it. I can't tell
>>via the viewfinder if the picture really is in focus
>>or not.
>
> If the autofocus isn't as good as manual focus, or if you have to
> check the autofocus, get a new camera. There are lots of reasons to
> use MF, but improving on the AF isn't one of them.
>
> -Joel
>

Actually, most AF systems can be outdone by careful manual focus. There are
some who swear that AF stands for "Approximate Focus." Most cameras rely, to
some extent, on depth of field to keep images in focus.
This from a confirmed AF guy, I haven't manually focused a lens more than
once or twice in 5 years.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 6:08:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eric Gill <ericvgill@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote in
>news:cou54v$iam$2@reader1.panix.com:

>> Robertwgross <robertwgross@cs.com> wrote:
>>>Bruce wrote:
>>>> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>>>>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>>>>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>>>>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, ...
>>>
>>>It may be possible to physically mount some FD lens onto the body, but
>>>it won't work worth a damn. Canon EOS bodies use EF lenses that have
>>>autofocus. The D Rebel also uses EF-S lenses.
>>
>>>I would suggest that if you have been a film photographer for years,
>>>you might want to try the slightly more serious cousins of the D
>>>Rebel, namely the 10D and 20D.
>>
>> Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.

>The 20D is the best of the line by far, but the age of autofocus has given
>us no dSLRs with really good focusing screens.

Yup. I figured that. I'll just have to save my pennies for
a 20D...

>There are two Canon models of magnifiers that help considerably, though.

---- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 8:00:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote in
news:cp8fju$uk$1@reader1.panix.com:

> Eric Gill <ericvgill@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>Paul J Gans <gans@panix.com> wrote in
>>news:cou54v$iam$2@reader1.panix.com:
>
>>> Robertwgross <robertwgross@cs.com> wrote:
>>>>Bruce wrote:
>>>>> I have been a film photog for years and am thinking of
>>>>>switching over to digital, and the Digital Rebel seems like
>>>>>a good place to start. I own the venerable F1 with FD lenses
>>>>>and wonder if they would fit the Digital Rebel body, ...
>>>>
>>>>It may be possible to physically mount some FD lens onto the body,
>>>>but it won't work worth a damn. Canon EOS bodies use EF lenses that
>>>>have autofocus. The D Rebel also uses EF-S lenses.
>>>
>>>>I would suggest that if you have been a film photographer for years,
>>>>you might want to try the slightly more serious cousins of the D
>>>>Rebel, namely the 10D and 20D.
>>>
>>> Do they have decent focussing screens? The 300D does not.
>
>>The 20D is the best of the line by far, but the age of autofocus has
>>given us no dSLRs with really good focusing screens.
>
> Yup. I figured that. I'll just have to save my pennies for
> a 20D...

As I told another photographer with a 10D I ran into at an event today,
"You'll like it."

Really.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:41:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>> If the autofocus isn't as good as manual focus, or if you have to
>> check the autofocus, get a new camera. There are lots of reasons to
>> use MF, but improving on the AF isn't one of them.
>
>Actually, most AF systems can be outdone by careful manual focus. There are
>some who swear that AF stands for "Approximate Focus." Most cameras rely, to
>some extent, on depth of field to keep images in focus.
>This from a confirmed AF guy, I haven't manually focused a lens more than
>once or twice in 5 years.

I'd be astonished if this were true. Does anyone have technical data
on the accuracy of auto-focusing?

I suppose it depends on what you are having the camera focus on. I
always use the AF the way I used to use MF - I decide what I want in
focus, find a contrasty part of that to focus on, focus, and then take
the picture. For example, I'll push the shutter half way down while
focusing on a person's eye, and then take the picture.

(MF is good for things that are moving in the distance. If you use
depth of field to keep things in focus, which is fine, and you set
your camera for just under infinity, everything far away will be in
focus. This is useful, for example, for taking pictures of birds.)

-Joel

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Please feed the 35mm lens/digicam databases: http://www.exc.com/photography
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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