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Noob Q: How to tell how many FW/USB busses my MB has?

Last response: in Motherboards
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December 16, 2010 11:33:05 AM

Hey guys,

I'm trying to render video, using 2 external HDDs. One reads the raw files, and the other is the destination for renders. I'm trying to keep the HDD's from being a bottleneck in my system, so I have the impression that I shouldn't put them on the same bus.

My question, can anyone tell me what to look for in the specs to answer this question? (Is "bus" even the right word?)

I built this myself, but I'm still learning about, well, everything. :) 





In the spec's, I only see ONE TI firewire chip:

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T.I. TSB43AB23 chip
Up to 3 IEEE 1394a ports (2 on the back panel, 1 via the IEEE 1394a bracket connected to the internal IEEE 1394a header)

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So I'm assuming that anything connected to these ports is routed through the same 'bus' -- correct? And if I needed to increase throughput, I need to get an extra card -- correct?




I'm also wondering then, about USB - how do I interpret these specs:

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Integrated in the South Bridge
Up to 10 USB 2.0/1.1 ports (6 on the back panel, including 2 eSATA/USB Combo, 4 via the USB brackets connected to the internal USB headers)

NEC chip:
Up to 2 USB 3.0/2.0 ports on the back panel
* USB 3.0 10x performance is a maximum theoretical value. Actual performance may vary by system configuration.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Two chips, so each has discreet throughput?






This is my MB:
GA-EX58-UD3R
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=...





Thanks a bunch, guys!

More about : noob usb busses

a c 105 V Motherboard
December 16, 2010 10:03:51 PM

I'm thinking no matter how you hook them up, your biggest drawback is just the speed of the HDs. External sata ports offer only a slight improvement and hardly noticable at that. I've got external sata ports plus usb ports with HDs and the external USB ports seem to RW almost as fast as the sata ports. The external sata ports are somewhat faster, though. I'm just going by the EMC Retrospect numbers when the drives are working.

a b V Motherboard
December 17, 2010 11:42:34 AM

The sata controller has more than enough bandwidth to read & write to SATA drives simultaniously. SATA uses dedicated ports so each port runs at full speed. This is unlike the older PATA ports that shared bandwidth.

I believe USB is also a shared bandwidth technology. If your case or motherboard don't support eSATA, you can get an eSATA bracket to install in your case. You'll need a couple extra SATA ports available on your motherboard to hook the bracket up to.
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December 18, 2010 8:35:28 PM

Are you guys sure about that? Everywhere I read, people say 7200 is good for video, with RAID being better, obviously. But my main question, how can I tell exactly how many *discrete* busses there are for each type of I/O.

SATA is always discrete? And for the rest, do I have to look up the number of controllers, etc? Thanks!

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a b V Motherboard
December 18, 2010 9:33:15 PM
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If your doing a lot of video editing or transferring large files, then yes, RAID makes sense. If you are just watching video files off your hard drive, then a single drive is fine. Most drives these days are 7200rpm. WD Blue drives are 5400 rpm. The contollers are either tied into the motherboards FSB (front side bus) or PCIe bus The PCIe bus has dedicated lanes some of which are tied into the SATA controller. Others are tied to the vid card slot and PCIe slots. The number of lanes is identified by a number like x1, x4, x8, x16. This is why you will see vid card slots listed this way, usually x8 or x16, because it will have either 8 or 16 PCIe lanes attatched to it. More lanes = more bandwidth.

USB is a shared bandwith bus. Without schematics, you probably won't know which USB ports go to which controller if there is more than one USB controller. If you're lucky, your manual will tell you.

On your board:
Integrated in the South Bridge
Up to 10 USB 2.0/1.1 ports (6 on the back panel, including 2 eSATA/USB Combo, 4 via the USB brackets connected to the internal USB headers)

NEC chip:
Up to 2 USB 3.0/2.0 ports on the back panel

So, The USB ports on the back labeled 3.0 will run off the NEC controller. The remaining 6 USB ports on the rear will run off the southbridge. The USB bracket attached to the mobo headers will also run off the southbridge.
December 19, 2010 5:20:25 PM

Ok, Thanks very much.
December 30, 2010 12:25:12 AM

Best answer selected by sevitzky.
!