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Taking Pictures in Las Vegas

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December 5, 2004 1:38:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

[Please note that this thread is being posted in both
rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]



Hi,


I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
glory on the pc.

Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
worth a cup of spit.
High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?


I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.

What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
a thing as casino photo etiquette?

What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
people.


-Steve
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:13:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Steve:

The Mandalay Bay or the Tropicana would be good places on the
southern end of the strip to get some shots. The Trop has 2 tall
towers; the Island Tower and the Paradise Tower. One of them, I
forget which, has windows in the hallways so you can see out without
going inside a room. Of course, on the northern strip you have the
Stratosphere.

You need to do a little preparation. No matter where you live,
there must be a fairly large city somewhere nearby. Go there and
practice getting some night shots. See what works and what doesn't.
Good luck.

Bob C.
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:58:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'll let the photo guys take care of the technical tips. A few notes
on Vegas:

Officially, there are no pictures allowed in the casinos. But as
you've discovered, as long as you are discrete and taking panoramic
shots of the whole area, 90% of the time they don't care. The other
10% they will politely tell you to put the camera away.


You asked where not to take the camera out. There are really only a
few things that can get you in trouble. The big no-no's would be
pictures of specific patrons gambling (unless its someone in your
party) casino personnel (unless you get permission - the CW's can be
especially touchy about getting their picture taken without
permission) and the obvious stuff (don't take pictures of security
personal or anything involving money such as the cage).

As for spots, you've discovered one of the best - the tops of parking
garages. The best are often not on the strip, but at the near strip
casinos - the Palms has some nice views.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 1:52:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 5 Dec 2004 06:58:34 -0800, salmoneous@aol.com (salmoneous) wrote:

>I'll let the photo guys take care of the technical tips. A few notes
>on Vegas:
>
>Officially, there are no pictures allowed in the casinos.

No longer true, and hasn't been for some years now.
Some are posted (the Venetian is one; the notices are pretty visible),
but most allow both still and video, as long as you don' tinterfere
with the other people.
I know, because I've had several people complain to security, and be
told just that.
>But as
>you've discovered, as long as you are discrete and taking panoramic
>shots of the whole area, 90% of the time they don't care. The other
>10% they will politely tell you to put the camera away.
>
>
>You asked where not to take the camera out. There are really only a
>few things that can get you in trouble. The big no-no's would be
>pictures of specific patrons gambling (unless its someone in your
>party) casino personnel (unless you get permission - the CW's can be
>especially touchy about getting their picture taken without
>permission) and the obvious stuff (don't take pictures of security
>personal or anything involving money such as the cage).
>
>As for spots, you've discovered one of the best - the tops of parking
>garages. The best are often not on the strip, but at the near strip
>casinos - the Palms has some nice views.

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 6:18:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Steve" <tunet@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:28d774b4.0412042238.9a4ed32@posting.google.com...
> [Please note that this thread is being posted in both
> rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]
>
>
>
> Hi,
>
>
> I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
> sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
> taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
> February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
> home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
> the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
> glory on the pc.
>
> Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
> photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
> in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
> 'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
> show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
> cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
> while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
> Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
> about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
> worth a cup of spit.
> High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
> to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
> air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
> Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?
>
>
> I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
> pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
> even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.
>
> What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
> a thing as casino photo etiquette?
>
> What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
> month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
> people.
>
>
> -Steve

When in doubt about photography in a casino seek out a security guard and
ask. That said, most casinos allow photography of their "decor-" most frown
on pics. of the gaming areas.

I have gotten some really great photos of Luxor-no flash-just ambient light
(my preference). Since I don't use the flash it's not real noticeable when I
take a pic. I didn't even turn on the flash during the trip. I use my
Olympus C-74 Ultra Zoom on auto 90% of the time. I've had the camera for a
year and am still learning about it! ;-)

Have fun!

jill in NH
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 6:18:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 15:18:51 GMT, "Jill in NH" <cmchalk@comcast.net>
wrote:

>
>"Steve" <tunet@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:28d774b4.0412042238.9a4ed32@posting.google.com...
>> [Please note that this thread is being posted in both
>> rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>>
>> I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
>> sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
>> taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
>> February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
>> home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
>> the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
>> glory on the pc.
>>
>> Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
>> photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
>> in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
>> 'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
>> show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
>> cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
>> while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
>> Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
>> about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
>> worth a cup of spit.
>> High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
>> to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
>> air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
>> Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?
>>
>>
>> I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
>> pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
>> even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.
>>
>> What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
>> a thing as casino photo etiquette?
>>
>> What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
>> month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
>> people.
>>
>>
>> -Steve
>
>When in doubt about photography in a casino seek out a security guard and
>ask. That said, most casinos allow photography of their "decor-" most frown
>on pics. of the gaming areas.

See my other post; this just isn't true any more.
It sure *used* to be; I remember being bodily picked up and removed
from a casino in Tahoe as I walked in with a camera.
Any more, no one cares unless the casino is posted no photos. Like the
Venetian.
>
>I have gotten some really great photos of Luxor-no flash-just ambient light
>(my preference). Since I don't use the flash it's not real noticeable when I
>take a pic. I didn't even turn on the flash during the trip. I use my
>Olympus C-74 Ultra Zoom on auto 90% of the time. I've had the camera for a
>year and am still learning about it! ;-)
>
>Have fun!
>
>jill in NH
>

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:54:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

As most have said, casinos usually don't mind wide, panoramic shots. We
stayed at Caesar's a few years ago and they were not picky at all.
Obviously, shows are not the same. Depends on the individual venue and the
artist.
I got some great overhead shots from the "Effel Tower" at the Paris Hotel.
Just get close to the fencing so that the camera looks through it. (Also
gives you something to lean on to steady the camera itself.)
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:31:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Got a great shot of the cow girl, cowboy downtown at 4AM from the middle of a
cross walk. You have to expose for the neon and bracket opening 1/2 to 1 stop
are the best, auto exposure generally won't hack it. A lot of folks I have
shown this pic to think I got it off the web. I have printed it to 20inches
square (digitized Rolleiflex 2 1/4 transparency). Even at that size some folks
still won't believe I took the picture.

Tom


In article <28d774b4.0412042238.9a4ed32@posting.google.com>,
tunet@tampabay.rr.com says...
>
>[Please note that this thread is being posted in both
>rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]
>
>
>
> Hi,
>
>
> I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
>sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
>taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
>February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
>home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
>the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
>glory on the pc.
>
> Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
>photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
>in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
>'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
>show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
>cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
>while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
> Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
>about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
>worth a cup of spit.
> High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
>to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
>air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
>Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?
>
>
> I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
>pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
>even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.
>
> What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
>a thing as casino photo etiquette?
>
> What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
>month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
>people.
>
>
> -Steve
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:54:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<< Right? Almost all of my night shots
show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? >>

Steve-

This suggests the signs are computer controlled, with different segments being
turned on separately. To the eye, you see it all, but the camera's fast
shutter only gets what is illuminated when it is open.

Although it may have a different cause, the effect is comparable to
photographing a computer monitor or a TV screen at a high shutter speed. The
solution may be to use a slower shutter speed.

Depending on your camera, you may be able to influence it to use a different
combination of shutter speed and lens aperture. One variable may be the ISO
rating. Sometimes just turning the flash on or off may make enough difference
to overcome the problem.

With a slower shutter speed comes a greater chance of camera shake. A tripod
may not be convenient on such a trip, so you need to learn to brace yourself
and hold your breath when taking the picture.

As far as judging pictures while in the camera, some allow you to use the
camera's zoom control to magnify the image in review mode.

Fred
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:54:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> See my other post; this just isn't true any more.
> It sure *used* to be; I remember being bodily picked up and removed
> from a casino in Tahoe as I walked in with a camera.
> Any more, no one cares unless the casino is posted no photos. Like the
> Venetian.
>>

Interesting about the Venetian-I have some lovely pics. of the hallway and
other things. I especially like to take photos of chandeliers in the dif.
casinos. I have to admit I've never seen (or looked for) signs-only asked
security about taking pictures.

FWIW I don't wear my camera around my neck-I keep it in my tote.
December 5, 2004 10:36:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
>photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
>in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
>'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
>show a sign in transition.

I have *NEVER* been able to get a decent shot of one of those Jumbotron
signs. :(  I haven't really tried that much, though. :)  :) 

>High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
>to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
>air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
>Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?

I got a couple very decent panoramas from the Flamingo parking garage.
I've got 2 of them on line at:

http://www.letis.com/dmr/pics/image_22447651_c.jpg and
http://www.letis.com/dmr/pics/image_22447660_c.jpg

I did these with a film camera, Olympus Stylus. I just braced the camera
against the structure, turned the flash off and let the auto-exposure do
its thing. I've been meaning to post some more Las Vegas photos, but
just haven't found the time.
December 5, 2004 10:36:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I spent 6 weeks in LV (and even won $2.00) house and cat sitting and took
over 1,000 photos.
I was a bit more "candid" doing floor shots in the actual casino part.
Learn how to shoot (use the camera) from the hip WITHOUT using the view
finder at your eye level!
All other areas and places were great and un-ending for places to take
pictures.......
My Kodaks LOVED night shots, and did real well with available light!
A link: http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?c=we6vpcn.113g50gv&x=0&y=-r0...



begin 666 invisible.gif
M1TE&.#EA`0`!`)'_`/___P```,# P ```"'Y! $```(`+ `````!``$```("
$5 $`.P``
`
end
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 10:36:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Did you visit the sign junkyard outside of town. It's were all the old
LV signs go to RIP. A friend spent some time there with his old
panasonic (1280x960) and came home with some great stuff.


Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
@/




On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 13:12:53 -0800, "howard" <fishfeeder@gmail(dot)com>
wrote:

>I spent 6 weeks in LV (and even won $2.00) house and cat sitting and took
>over 1,000 photos.
>I was a bit more "candid" doing floor shots in the actual casino part.
>Learn how to shoot (use the camera) from the hip WITHOUT using the view
>finder at your eye level!
>All other areas and places were great and un-ending for places to take
>pictures.......
>My Kodaks LOVED night shots, and did real well with available light!
>A link: http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?c=we6vpcn.113g50gv&x=0&y=-r0...
>
>
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 11:50:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"howard" <fishfeeder@gmail(dot)com> wrote in message news:<jNCdnfKFVJYD5C7cRVn-uw@scnresearch.com>...

These are some AWESOME pics! Thanks for sharing.


--EE--

> I spent 6 weeks in LV (and even won $2.00) house and cat sitting and took
> over 1,000 photos.
> I was a bit more "candid" doing floor shots in the actual casino part.
> Learn how to shoot (use the camera) from the hip WITHOUT using the view
> finder at your eye level!
> All other areas and places were great and un-ending for places to take
> pictures.......
> My Kodaks LOVED night shots, and did real well with available light!
> A link: http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?c=we6vpcn.113g50gv&x=0&y=-r0...
>
>
>
> begin 666 invisible.gif
> M1TE&.#EA`0`!`)'_`/___P```,# P ```"'Y! $```(`+ `````!``$```("
> $5 $`.P``
> `
> end
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 12:28:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Howard,
That is absolutely the best set of Vegas photos I have seen listed in
this News Group!
Thank you , thank you!


howard wrote:

>I spent 6 weeks in LV (and even won $2.00) house and cat sitting and took
>over 1,000 photos.
>I was a bit more "candid" doing floor shots in the actual casino part.
>Learn how to shoot (use the camera) from the hip WITHOUT using the view
>finder at your eye level!
>All other areas and places were great and un-ending for places to take
>pictures.......
>My Kodaks LOVED night shots, and did real well with available light!
>A link: http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?c=we6vpcn.113g50gv&x=0&y=-r0...
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 1:20:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>
> On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 13:12:53 -0800, "howard" <fishfeeder@gmail(dot)com>
> wrote:
>
>>I spent 6 weeks in LV (and even won $2.00) house and cat sitting and took
>>over 1,000 photos.
>>I was a bit more "candid" doing floor shots in the actual casino part.
>>Learn how to shoot (use the camera) from the hip WITHOUT using the view
>>finder at your eye level!
>>All other areas and places were great and un-ending for places to take
>>pictures.......
>>My Kodaks LOVED night shots, and did real well with available light!
>>A link: http://www.ofoto.com/I.jsp?c=we6vpcn.113g50gv&x=0&y=-r0...
>>
>>
>

Really excellent pics. Loved them all! Thanks for posting your link.

jill in NH
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 1:38:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Wonderful set up pics, thanks for sharing!
just wonderful!
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 3:43:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The only problem that you may have is with a guest that may not want their
photo taken and has no compunction in letting you know. At that point,
Security could confiscate your camera just because it bothers a person
gambling. Sounds silly i know, but it happens.
The best thing to do is to contact the casino directly.

--
+++++++++++++++++++++++++
Don Strevel in Las Vegas
http://www.mysecretvegas.com
info@mysecretvegas.com
"Steve" <tunet@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:28d774b4.0412042238.9a4ed32@posting.google.com...
> [Please note that this thread is being posted in both
> rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]
>
>
>
> Hi,
>
>
> I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
> sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
> taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
> February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
> home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
> the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
> glory on the pc.
>
> Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
> photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
> in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
> 'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
> show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
> cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
> while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
> Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
> about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
> worth a cup of spit.
> High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
> to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
> air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
> Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?
>
>
> I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
> pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
> even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.
>
> What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
> a thing as casino photo etiquette?
>
> What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
> month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
> people.
>
>
> -Steve
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 3:59:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Strevel" <dstrevel@cox.net> wrote in message
news:Lv3td.200595$hj.11773@fed1read07...
> The only problem that you may have is with a guest that may not want their
> photo taken and has no compunction in letting you know. At that point,
> Security could confiscate your camera just because it bothers a person
> gambling. Sounds silly i know, but it happens.
> The best thing to do is to contact the casino directly.

Though I agree it's best to contact the casino directly, I doubt whether
casinos have the ability to confiscate a camera because a casino guest
objected to having their photo taken. When I shoot in Las Vegas, I always
ask permission but, regardless, anyone attempting to seize my camera could,
at minimum, expect me to press charges for assault and theft.

Casinos have the right to control both access and the kind of activities
conducted within. They do not have the right to assault patrons (except to
the extent provided by law, e.g. detaining thieves, etc.). Also, as a
matter of law, I'd be surprised whether anyone has a reasonable expectation
of privacy (the legal standard for precluding someone from using your
photograph) in a casino (though the private high-limit areas may be a
different story).

I know that LV municipal law and NV state law favors the casinos, but even
there there are limits.

>
> --
> +++++++++++++++++++++++++
> Don Strevel in Las Vegas
> http://www.mysecretvegas.com
> info@mysecretvegas.com
> "Steve" <tunet@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:28d774b4.0412042238.9a4ed32@posting.google.com...
> > [Please note that this thread is being posted in both
> > rec.photo.digital and alt.vacation.las-vegas]
> >
> >
> >
> > Hi,
> >
> >
> > I hope that you fine folks don't mind two newsgroups
> > sharing this thread. Las Vegas offers a lot of unique challenges to
> > taking the perfect picture. Our last trip to Las Vegas, last
> > February, we had our digital camera for only six weeks. When we got
> > home I found out I had a lot to learn. Flaws that don't show up on
> > the camera's little screen come out when they're seen in all their
> > glory on the pc.
> >
> > Night shots, Neon and Water: When the professional
> > photographers come in to take one of those great pics we see online or
> > in some tourist mag --- some guy from the casino comes out and hits a
> > 'pause' button for the sign. Right? Almost all of my night shots
> > show a sign in transition. Should I accept an underexposed pic and
> > cuss at it with imaging software when I get home? I have no mercy
> > while on the road, if a pic looks bad on the camera's screen I delete.
> > Water. The Fountains and the Bellagio, I took over 200 pics and
> > about 30 made the cut and came home. Not one of the night shots was
> > worth a cup of spit.
> > High shots looking down on the Strip. Where should one go
> > to get the best shots looking down on the Strip? We got our best open
> > air shots off the top floor of the parking garage next to the UA
> > Showcase theater. Where else can one take a high up open air pic?
> >
> >
> > I guess I should ask where one should not try to take a
> > pic. A lot of the casinos seem to allow pics. Where should I not
> > even think of even taking my camera out, let alone turn it on.
> >
> > What casinos are the most camera friendly? Is there such
> > a thing as casino photo etiquette?
> >
> > What else am I missing? We hope to be in Las Vegas next
> > month. I want to take pics worthy of sharing with all you great
> > people.
> >
> >
> > -Steve
>
>
December 6, 2004 6:53:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

on the strip near the BIG COCA-COLA bottle

H
December 6, 2004 10:11:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

PTravel wrote:

> "Don Strevel" <dstrevel@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:Lv3td.200595$hj.11773@fed1read07...
>
>>The only problem that you may have is with a guest that may not want their
>>photo taken and has no compunction in letting you know. At that point,
>>Security could confiscate your camera just because it bothers a person
>>gambling. Sounds silly i know, but it happens.
>> The best thing to do is to contact the casino directly.
>
>
> Though I agree it's best to contact the casino directly, I doubt whether
> casinos have the ability to confiscate a camera because a casino guest
> objected to having their photo taken. When I shoot in Las Vegas, I always
> ask permission but, regardless, anyone attempting to seize my camera could,
> at minimum, expect me to press charges for assault and theft.
>
> Casinos have the right to control both access and the kind of activities
> conducted within. They do not have the right to assault patrons (except to
> the extent provided by law, e.g. detaining thieves, etc.). Also, as a
> matter of law, I'd be surprised whether anyone has a reasonable expectation
> of privacy (the legal standard for precluding someone from using your
> photograph) in a casino (though the private high-limit areas may be a
> different story).
>
> I know that LV municipal law and NV state law favors the casinos, but even
> there there are limits.
>


The won't confiscate your gear, but they will ask you to cease and
desist. If you don't, they'll ask you and your gear hit the bricks. If
you don't do that, the LVPD will confiscate you, your gear, and could
charge you with trespass. If you resist, it's criminal trespass and
anything else they trump on. Inside a casino, the wishes of any patron
spending money (losing) always matters. Las Vegas was built on the
backs of losers - not shutterbugs - and they know it. A pro will always
work with the casino staff, including, and limited by, staff
recommendations.

When I was in the Mirage last year, a pro was working near the bar, and
casino staff were cheerfully assisting her on knowing where NOT to point
a lens, and she was cheerfully abiding her "assistants".


--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 10:11:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
news:cp2vsp$j8@library1.airnews.net...
> PTravel wrote:
>
> > "Don Strevel" <dstrevel@cox.net> wrote in message
> > news:Lv3td.200595$hj.11773@fed1read07...
> >
> >>The only problem that you may have is with a guest that may not want
their
> >>photo taken and has no compunction in letting you know. At that point,
> >>Security could confiscate your camera just because it bothers a person
> >>gambling. Sounds silly i know, but it happens.
> >> The best thing to do is to contact the casino directly.
> >
> >
> > Though I agree it's best to contact the casino directly, I doubt whether
> > casinos have the ability to confiscate a camera because a casino guest
> > objected to having their photo taken. When I shoot in Las Vegas, I
always
> > ask permission but, regardless, anyone attempting to seize my camera
could,
> > at minimum, expect me to press charges for assault and theft.
> >
> > Casinos have the right to control both access and the kind of activities
> > conducted within. They do not have the right to assault patrons (except
to
> > the extent provided by law, e.g. detaining thieves, etc.). Also, as a
> > matter of law, I'd be surprised whether anyone has a reasonable
expectation
> > of privacy (the legal standard for precluding someone from using your
> > photograph) in a casino (though the private high-limit areas may be a
> > different story).
> >
> > I know that LV municipal law and NV state law favors the casinos, but
even
> > there there are limits.
> >
>
>
> The won't confiscate your gear, but they will ask you to cease and
> desist.

Well of course. Entry into the casinos is by license, which is revocable.
Nothing you wrote contradicts what I wrote. My only point was that Don was
overstating the case -- the casinos cannot confiscate your camera because
you took a picture inside.

> If you don't, they'll ask you and your gear hit the bricks. If
> you don't do that, the LVPD will confiscate you, your gear, and could
> charge you with trespass. If you resist, it's criminal trespass and
> anything else they trump on. Inside a casino, the wishes of any patron
> spending money (losing) always matters. Las Vegas was built on the
> backs of losers - not shutterbugs - and they know it. A pro will always
> work with the casino staff, including, and limited by, staff
> recommendations.
>
> When I was in the Mirage last year, a pro was working near the bar, and
> casino staff were cheerfully assisting her on knowing where NOT to point
> a lens, and she was cheerfully abiding her "assistants".
>
>
> --
> jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:01:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.vacation.las-vegas,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 12:43:24 -0800, "Don Strevel" <dstrevel@cox.net>
wrote:

>The only problem that you may have is with a guest that may not want their
>photo taken and has no compunction in letting you know. At that point,
>Security could confiscate your camera just because it bothers a person
>gambling. Sounds silly i know, but it happens.
> The best thing to do is to contact the casino directly.

What security *could* do and what security *will* do are two different
things.I've taken a lot of pics in casinos, even with flash, and never
had a problem, even after being reported to security (in the
Stardust).
The Venetian has posted no cameras, but I've never been hassled there
shooting both still and video.
Sometimes some patrons ask me to not take photos of them, and I comply
easily; there are plenty of people who don't mind at all.
The last time I was asked to not take photos was in 1975 in Lake Tahoe
(and I got to take pics anyway, escorted by a VP - I was taking pics
for a photo essay for an American History class on Gold).
--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
July 16, 2012 11:40:16 PM

I agree re: the top of parking lots. I really like pictures from the top of the Bellagio parking lot.
!