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Botched repair

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 1:54:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Long story, made short. Brought the Gateway 600 in for a repair, couldn't
access the USB ports. I figured it was a software problem as it was
intermittent.

Figured the geeks would back everything up and get it working. well, they
tried but stated that the 2 year old hard drive, no problems heretofore,
CRASHED. They ordered a new drive from Gateway (warranty) and we talked
about recovery options, there were some important documents on the 30 Gb
drive. Despite several conversations stating how much it would be worth to
me to try to recover the data, they sent it back the Gateway! Gateway cannot
trace it is GONE.

I am seeking some recompense, what do you think I should ask for, i.e. what
is a 30Gb crashed hard drive worth. FYI, I was prepared to spend $500 to try
to recover the data.

Stuart Friedman

More about : botched repair

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 5:50:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You are out of luck.

Everyone screwed up here. For a customer -- ANY customer -- NEVER take
a computer in for service with irreplaceable data on the hard drive.
You should always assume, no matter what the problem is, no matter where
you take it, that the hard drive's contents will be lost. ALWAYS. NO
MATTER WHAT.

They clearly shouldn't have done what they did, but in my view, you
probably have no recourse. If the hard drive was replaced under
warranty, you have no right to it's return (in terms of the physical
drive, ignoring any data thereon). [If it had been replaced at your
expense, then you do have a right to return of the defective hard drive.]

Most service shops will have a customer sign a "data loss waiver" UP
FRONT, before they will work on a PC.

This applies to both laptops and desktops.


Stuart Friedman wrote:

> Long story, made short. Brought the Gateway 600 in for a repair, couldn't
> access the USB ports. I figured it was a software problem as it was
> intermittent.
>
> Figured the geeks would back everything up and get it working. well, they
> tried but stated that the 2 year old hard drive, no problems heretofore,
> CRASHED. They ordered a new drive from Gateway (warranty) and we talked
> about recovery options, there were some important documents on the 30 Gb
> drive. Despite several conversations stating how much it would be worth to
> me to try to recover the data, they sent it back the Gateway! Gateway cannot
> trace it is GONE.
>
> I am seeking some recompense, what do you think I should ask for, i.e. what
> is a 30Gb crashed hard drive worth. FYI, I was prepared to spend $500 to try
> to recover the data.
>
> Stuart Friedman
>
>
September 14, 2004 9:06:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry's right. I'd go one step further and say you are crazy to
operate normally with irreplacable data on your laptop hard drive
without a copy. Hard drives can crash AT ANY TIME, FOR NO APPARENT
REASON, and you could lose *EVERYTHING*. This has happened to me I
think three times now in the last ten years. The last two times, I
had backups to work with, and the last time in March, I had 95% of
everything in backup (100% of everything I cared much about).

I try to take every opportunity to warn people about hard drives -
they are far from indestructible! The easiest way to backup crucial
files is with a CD burner, by hand. But there are also automatic
programs you can run to make complete backups of files that have
changed over time. I prefer using removable hard drives to make
backups. And yes, I have my data on more than one backup hard drive,
in case one of the backups dies. And I much some on CD/DVD too (we
are talking GB and GB of digital photos for example).

CD and DVD discs can fail, too. If you have only one copy of
important files on a CD or DVD, I'd worry, because I have had CD's I
burned 2-3 years ago go bad on me more than once. Better to have a
2nd copy of everything.

I'm sorry about your data loss. Like a lot of us, sometimes you have
to learn the hard way.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
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----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 12:26:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Stuart Friedman" <shrinkwrap86@hotmailxxx.com> wrote:
>Figured the geeks would back everything up and get it working. well, they
>tried but stated that the 2 year old hard drive, no problems heretofore,
>CRASHED. They ordered a new drive from Gateway (warranty) and we talked
>about recovery options, there were some important documents on the 30 Gb
>drive. Despite several conversations stating how much it would be worth to
>me to try to recover the data, they sent it back the Gateway! Gateway cannot
>trace it is GONE.

Sounds like several issues here. You don't have backups, though with
20-20 hindsight, I'll bet you understand their importance. The techs
you took the machine do didn't do a backup, though it might have been
a good idea for them to have done so, but would you have paid them
(say) an extra hundred bucks to do so (before they ever touched your
machine)?

[Gateway and the drive manufacturers have no interest in your
problems, drives are (typically) not repaired any more, and for them
to get into data recovery would be a complete rathole. This is
detailed in their warranty and RMA procedures, in explicit language.]

I have a hard time understanding why the techs couldn't understand "I
WANT MY DATA BACK!"

>is a 30Gb crashed hard drive worth.

Approximately zero dollars. However, it probably would have cost you
about $100 to keep the old one, just because of how the warranty
process works.

> FYI, I was prepared to spend $500 to try
>to recover the data.

The only time I've ever done it it cost $1200, and my impression was
that was a fairly fixed price...

As someone who has seen this from the other side, yes computers often
fail in strange and unexpected ways just when the tech first touches
it. I often do backups as a first step just to prevent this kind of
problem. Frequently the act of transporting a computer to the repair
place will cause something to fail, especially if it's tossed in the
trunk of a car...

I don't think you have any recourse, though I'm sure you could find a
lawyer to tell you differently.
!