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What fabrication process is 750i?

what is the fabrication process that made 750i? i had been google it for a while can couldn't get a suitable answer. if anyone knows this please contact me!
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  1. I'm sorry, but you need to be more specific...are you referring to the fab process of the CPU that goes into a 750i motherboard?

    If so than I believe all LGA 775 CPU's used a 65nm or 45nm fabrication process, depending on which CPU.
  2. Not sure. I'm going to guess 90nm. Might be 130nm but I doubt that. They ran hot, so I wouldn't guess 65nm either.

    What difference does it make?
  3. 4745454b said:
    Not sure. I'm going to guess 90nm. Might be 130nm but I doubt that. They ran hot, so I wouldn't guess 65nm either.

    What difference does it make?


    I hope you are not referring to the CPU's that the 750i supported...
  4. LOL, no. Also I'm pretty sure there were some P4s on S775 that were 90nm weren't there?
  5. amk09 said:
    I hope you are not referring to the CPU's that the 750i supported...


    have you read the topic? did i ever mention any word that related to "support".

    i just want to know what process is it made off as i try to gather older 775 part for my home theater and the only mobo that i had on my hand is p5n-d which i'm kinda concern about power consumption and heat because the north bridge will having very bad influence to processor/graphic card cooling if it's older process like my olddy x38's 90nm and 975x's 130nm(which they are very hot).....
  6. If thats what your after, I would look into the TDP of the chips, not what process it was. I also think you'd be better off looking for a board with good cooling.
  7. 4745454b said:
    If thats what your after, I would look into the TDP of the chips, not what process it was. I also think you'd be better off looking for a board with good cooling.


    i tried to look up nvidia's website and search entire google result and find giving answer that relate to tdp and fab process. plus p5n-d is a sli board that had 2 8800gt sli which that's why i'm worry(pcie controller may generate more heat when watch blue ray)...
  8. It shouldn't add much. Even the power hungry chips are looking at 20W for the NB and another 7-10 for the SB. So 30W? Its not much. As long as they have a good sink with good case air flow it won't contribute anywhere near as much heat/noise as two 8800GTs.

    Why are you doing an SLI setup for a HTPC? Not only that, I'm pretty sure the GPU is used to decode blu rays so little stress should be on the NB.
  9. 4745454b said:
    It shouldn't add much. Even the power hungry chips are looking at 20W for the NB and another 7-10 for the SB. So 30W? Its not much. As long as they have a good sink with good case air flow it won't contribute anywhere near as much heat/noise as two 8800GTs.

    Why are you doing an SLI setup for a HTPC? Not only that, I'm pretty sure the GPU is used to decode blu rays so little stress should be on the NB.



    i had pair of aged reference 8800gt that leave aside for years after i got my gtx 260 sli(now gtx 460 sli) and it would be such wasted if i just leave them while they are still in good condition. i know you will suggest me to sell these card but it won't worth that much money anymore even if i sell them. that's why i gonna keep them for sli....

    and small question, isn't that sli setup will stress the pcie controller power consumption when during heavy loading like movie decode or flash animation? as far as i know pcie controller is inside the northbridge....
  10. But you don't need SLI 8800GTs to decode movies or flash. That's what I was trying to say. A single 8800GT will be fine. It will also run cooler, quieter, etc. I understand that you have both already and it won't cost you anything up front to use them, but its overkill for what you want.

    The SLI setup should stress the NB more then a single card would. More reason to just use the single card.
  11. 4745454b said:
    But you don't need SLI 8800GTs to decode movies or flash. That's what I was trying to say. A single 8800GT will be fine. It will also run cooler, quieter, etc. I understand that you have both already and it won't cost you anything up front to use them, but its overkill for what you want.

    The SLI setup should stress the NB more then a single card would. More reason to just use the single card.


    i think you're right...leave single card setup may be a much better choice :(

    anyway is 750i suppose to be 90nm or 65nm?
  12. This is a simple problem, life just need to be simple. Be happy everyday and I think all your problems will be solved! I get a site (http://answers.pcwatch.com) where you can submit your question and you would get answers from other users.
  13. Best answer
    The simple answer to the OP's original post is TSMC's 90 nm process technology.
  14. ko888 said:
    The simple answer to the OP's original post is TSMC's 90 nm process technology.



    thank you for the answer!
  15. Best answer selected by cheesesubs.
  16. Any proof or links? I guessed 90nm in my first reply, but a websearch didn't turn anything up in the first few pages.
  17. 4745454b said:
    Any proof or links? I guessed 90nm in my first reply, but a websearch didn't turn anything up in the first few pages.

    There is a comparison of the 750i and 780i here:

    http://www.guru3d.com/article/evga-nforce-750i-sli-ftw-for-the-win-review/2
  18. Gotcha, thank you. I was looking for something like that when I was trying to answer the first time but didn't see anything. A bit surprised I guessed correctly. Guess I might know a few things after all...
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