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Core i7 920 temperature

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  • CPUs
  • Cooling
  • Intel i7
  • Temperature
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
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June 21, 2010 9:24:49 AM

Hello,
I'm using V8 cooler with my core i7 920, and my idle temp is 44c and in heavy load 60c, is that normal?

More about : core 920 temperature

June 22, 2010 12:07:42 AM

Yup 120c is the cut off point and anything under 80c won't damage the chip :) 
June 22, 2010 12:10:32 AM

Is it overclocked? If so, to what speed?
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June 22, 2010 12:33:04 AM

Thats about right if you are overclocked to 3.7 or a little higher, my idle temp is 44c @ 3.740mhz on a i7 960

Also, did you just buy that V-8 cooler? Much better coolers at the same or better price then the V-8, I am using the dark knight...

But may change this out for a FRIO later


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June 22, 2010 12:41:12 AM

At, and beyond 4.0 GHz is where liquid cooling starts becoming necessary. You can reach 4.0 GHz using some high-end air coolers, but it is not recommended.

Around 4.6 GHz seems to be the ceiling for liquid cooling. The next level of cooling is phase-change cooling, then LN2.

I have never overclocked anything before in my life. I'd like to get my i7 930 to a humble 3.0 or 3.2 GHz using my ZALMAN CNPS9900 which I could probably very easily do so. But I'd probably screw something up and end up damaging my CPU and voiding it's warranty.
June 22, 2010 12:46:56 AM

ambam said:
At, and beyond 4.0 GHz is where liquid cooling starts becoming necessary. You can reach 4.0 GHz using some high-end air coolers, but it is not recommended.

Around 4.6 GHz seems to be the ceiling for liquid cooling. The next level of cooling is phase-change cooling, then LN2.

I have never overclocked anything before in my life. I'd like to get my i7 930 to a humble 3.0 or 3.2 GHz using my ZALMAN CNPS9900 which I could probably very easily do so. But I'd probably screw something up and end up damaging my CPU and voiding it's warranty.



Man, you are wasting your i7 930 :(  Get a decent 40 dollars cooler and at least OC it to 3.7 where it runs the same temp @ stock but much faster!

What board do you have?
June 22, 2010 12:53:33 AM

solidnickel said:
Man, you are wasting your i7 930 :(  Get a decent 40 dollars cooler and at least OC it to 3.7 where it runs the same temp @ stock but much faster!

What board do you have?


ASUS P6T SE X58. It was not my initial mobo choice, but It was part of a CPU and motherboard bundle which saved me about $250. I had my eyes on a Gigabyte X58.

I'm afraid that I'll screw something up bad during the overclocking procedure, and end up damaging or destroying my PC parts, not to mention voiding any warranty I may have had with it. I have never overclocked anything before in my life. Apparently it must be done very carefully, and you really have to know what you're doing.

Is it true that you can only increase the CPU speed by about 200 MHz per BIOS visit? If you dial up a 1.0 GHz overclock all at once, you'll end up utterly destroying your CPU?

You also have to increase the CPU voltage to stabilize your overclock.
June 22, 2010 1:22:16 AM

ambam said:
ASUS P6T SE X58. It was not my initial mobo choice, but It was part of a CPU and motherboard bundle which saved me about $250. I had my eyes on a Gigabyte X58.

I'm afraid that I'll screw something up bad during the overclocking procedure, and end up damaging or destroying my PC parts, not to mention voiding any warranty I may have had with it. I have never overclocked anything before in my life. Apparently it must be done very carefully, and you really have to know what you're doing.

Is it true that you can only increase the CPU speed by about 200 MHz per BIOS visit? If you dial up a 1.0 GHz overclock all at once, you'll end up utterly destroying your CPU?

You also have to increase the CPU voltage to stabilize your overclock.



Its fairly easy but varies from board to board. That Asus board you have is very popular and I am sure that you can find a overclocking template or I can help you with the settings.

I was pretty much on my own with my EVGA which can take some time to get it rock solid at your goal clock which mine happens to be 3.7, I do not see the need to go any higher unless I were benching.

You can increase you BCLK to 10 increments at a time then test. For instance, I have a i7 960 with a 24x multi so I set my BCLK to 150 but started at 133, your default base clock is 133. My Vcore is only at 1.223 Volts.
June 22, 2010 2:19:48 AM

solidnickel said:
Its fairly easy but varies from board to board. That Asus board you have is very popular and I am sure that you can find a overclocking template or I can help you with the settings.

I was pretty much on my own with my EVGA which can take some time to get it rock solid at your goal clock which mine happens to be 3.7, I do not see the need to go any higher unless I were benching.

You can increase you BCLK to 10 increments at a time then test. For instance, I have a i7 960 with a 24x multi so I set my BCLK to 150 but started at 133, your default base clock is 133. My Vcore is only at 1.223 Volts.


That board also has the ASUS TurboV tool. Which is a much more user-friendly way of overclocking.

I have a ZALMAN CNPS9900 CPU cooler. It isn't the best, but it's certainly a heck of a lot better than the junk stock Intel cooler. Which is why I got it.
!