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Built new PC can I use Windows 7 OEM

Last response: in Windows 7
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October 24, 2011 7:42:49 PM

I apologize if this has been asked and resolved before (I'm sure it has) but I can't seem to find an answer.. perhaps my ability to use a search bar is subparr.

Recently built a new gaming PC and need to purchase Windows 7. Can I legally purchase and install an OEM version of Windows 7 Home Premium? Will this copy function the same as any other version of Windows 7? Don't plan to resell the computer.

Thanks for the help in advance everyone.

More about : built windows oem

a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 7:48:24 PM

Yes you can most definitely use an OEM version of windows 7.

The main difference between the OEM and the full retail version is that it will be tied to the motherboard inside your computer and can not be transferred to another computer with a different motherboard. So if later on you decide to upgrade your motherboard or build a completely new pc you won't be able to use the OEM version of windows 7 you already installed.

There are cases reported where people were able to transfer the OEM license by calling Microsoft though. Although I wouldn't rely on that method if you planned to use that license on a different system in the future.
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October 24, 2011 7:52:52 PM

Great that's exactly what I wanted to hear. If I install my MB and Windows and all else, and end up RMAing the MB due to a defection a week or so later.. could this pose a problem where I may be out 100 for the copy of Windows?
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October 24, 2011 7:53:02 PM

OEM Win 7 Home! So cheap! Go go go! Do it! It's legal:) 
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October 24, 2011 7:53:56 PM

usncooper said:
Great that's exactly what I wanted to hear. If I install my MB and Windows and all else, and end up RMAing the MB due to a defection a week or so later.. could this pose a problem where I may be out 100 for the copy of Windows?


As long as you have proof of the RMA Seaman, you should be good!
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October 24, 2011 7:56:55 PM

While I can never appreciate the seaman shot enough, it's actually Petty Officer. My seaman days in big Navy are over, thanks. :)  Thanks for the reply either way!
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 7:58:38 PM

usncooper said:
Great that's exactly what I wanted to hear. If I install my MB and Windows and all else, and end up RMAing the MB due to a defection a week or so later.. could this pose a problem where I may be out 100 for the copy of Windows?


Yes it could pose a problem. It is possible that if you received the same exact model replacement and called Microsoft that you might be able to re-use the license. Don't know about if you get a different motherboard all together though.

I personally went for an upgrade version of windows 7 so that I'm able to move the license around.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:00:06 PM

OEM is transferable to a New MB (Same or upgraded makes no difference) as long as the orignal MB is resting-in-peace - that is it died and went to where ever all good DEAD MBs go. It is NOT transferable if you just up and decide to upgrade currently working MB.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:06:37 PM

Pulled from the link area51repopened posted...

"Your copy of Windows is locked to the PC on which you purchased it. You cannot transfer that license to another PC.
You can upgrade any components or peripherals on your PC and keep your license intact. You can replace the motherboard with an identical model or an equivalent model from the OEM if it fails. However, if you personally replace or upgrade the motherboard, your OEM Windows license is null and void. "
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October 24, 2011 8:06:49 PM

Thanks for the input, I believe it's Chief Master Sergeant. Seems to be a general consensus that it will perfectly okay for me to purchase and install Windows 7 OEM on the newly built PC then?
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:07:34 PM

I have it on 2 computers!
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:08:02 PM

Yup, your good.
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:09:08 PM

OEM is the way to go,good luck with the install!
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October 24, 2011 8:12:47 PM

One last question, can an OEM copy be purchased in store? Or specifically online.. have had no luck finding copies in store. (Just a little tired of waiting on UPS/Fedex to ship all this stuff to me here.) If so, where? If not, well then I guess UPS will earn another days pay from me.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 8:20:06 PM

Should be able to find the OEM version at most PC shops that also sell components (though some do require buying system components in order to purchase it since they are only supposed to be sold with a new system) -- As for your original question YEs you can use an OEM version but if you want to be completely Legal the OEM EULA has changed and now states that OEM is for resale systems only no longer for home builders personal use ! -- Here is an exerpt from Maximum PC on the subject :

Quote:
Whenever we recommend a build list for new systems, we inevitably turn to Windows OEM editions for the OS. They are bit for bit just as powerful as their retail cousins, but may require a bit of telephone tag with Microsoft when upgrading and you were stuck with nobody to call if you need support. Overall the experience wasn't so bad given the discount, but an important, albeit subtle change in the Windows 7 EULA could permanently alter this recommendation. The specific clause found in prior OEM editions of Windows is as follows:

"OEM system builder software packs are intended for PC and server manufacturers or assemblers ONLY. They are not intended for distribution to end users. Unless the end user is actually assembling his/her own PC, in which case, that end user is considered a system builder as well."

As you can see from the above passage, prior versions clearly made allowance for those that assembled their own system, sadly, this is no longer the case in Windows 7. Assuming this isn't a mistake (and when do lawyers ever make mistakes), then Windows 7 OEM editions can legally only be installed on machines you intend to sell. I suppose you could always pawn off your new machine to a family member for a song, then politely ask them to return it, but Microsoft clearly wants to push more home users over to the retail edition.

You can still buy OEM editions as easily as before from online retailers such as Newegg, but if your moral compass points true north, you'll need to buy retail editions on new systems you aren't selling from now on. Will this stop you from using OEM editions?
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a b $ Windows 7
October 24, 2011 9:07:44 PM

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/window...

Ref: PC Mag articale. Seems to be dated (old - Nov 15, 2009). Seems like this goes in cycles with the end result, if you are building your own, you are the system builder weather you sell it or not.

At one point newegg required that you buy a computer part before being allowed to buy the OEM version - that went out the window (NO pun intended) pretty quick.
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