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Overclock resets when I restart computer

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 22, 2010 7:45:52 PM

Hello all, I have a Radeon 5850, win 7 64 bit, ASUS p6x deluxe mobo, and an i7 930. I used MSI afterburner to control fan speeds on the card and the AMD gpu overclocking tool to O.C. it (Afterbunrer won't do it for some reason). The only problem is, that it resets to factory defaults everything I restart my computer. Is this normal? And if not what can I do to prevent it. I have afterburner set to use overclock on computer restart so thats not it.

On a side note, I cannot use the sleep function on my win 7 because the monitor will not display after I wake it up from sleep, any help there is appreciated as well.

Thanks
March 22, 2010 8:01:29 PM

By "AMD gpu overclocking tool," do you mean you're using the ATI Catalyst Control Center's OverDrive function to overclock the card? Sounds to me as though the programs are conflicting with each other...

Considering you can manually control the clock and fan speeds from within CCC, I'm not certain you need anything else installed. Try uninstalling the additional programs and just use CCC for the OC and see if it's settings stick.
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March 22, 2010 8:03:44 PM

Afterburner is needed to raise the voltage on the HD5850/70. It can't be done with CCC and so the OCing potential will be severely limited without it.
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March 22, 2010 9:02:07 PM

This is the reason I bought the Asus card.

Current tweaks are
1.2V
950 Core
1250 shader

43C idle
60C full throttle

Running stable for hours on end at 2560x1600 with 4AA and it does not reset after reboot.
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March 22, 2010 9:06:22 PM

That is an impressive Core tweak, but doesn't really answer my question at all as to why it is resetting.
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March 22, 2010 9:34:48 PM

Sorry for the confusion earlier, but I've not used that program, so I'm not sure how it saves it's settings. Does it reprogram the BIOS, or does it run at system start-up and apply it's settings at that time?

I stand by what I said about 2 or more programs that can control such settings running simultaneously, as they could easily conflict with or override each other.

And Afterburner isn't needed. You can BIOS mod voltage settings, rather than leave software to handle it.
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March 23, 2010 2:02:46 AM

If you aren't going to be altering the voltage I recommend rivatuner;
http://www.guru3d.com/index.php?page=rivatuner
Just get the core/memory/fan settings the way you want and save them as a profile. Activate the profile before gaming, deactivate afterward to save power.
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March 23, 2010 12:37:12 PM

After reading that article, I think your settings don't save because you're not actually modding the BIOS, nor are you loading a modified Afterburner profile with those "beyond limitations" parameters saved within it after your system boots. This means you'll have to manually adjust the settings within AMD GPU Clock Tool every time.

I suggest re-reading page 4 of that modding tutorial you linked.
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a b K Overclocking
March 23, 2010 1:59:43 PM

Just because another program appears to allow you to go beyond what CCC does doesn't mean it's safe or correct. I wouldn't push it past the limits that ATI has set or else you risk damaging your card or your motherboard.

Maybe it's resetting because it's not an allowable setting?

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March 23, 2010 4:45:23 PM

Thank you I proly didn't read page four because I didn't want to get into voltage stuff. Thanks!
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March 23, 2010 6:25:19 PM

isamuelson said:
Just because another program appears to allow you to go beyond what CCC does doesn't mean it's safe or correct. I wouldn't push it past the limits that ATI has set or else you risk damaging your card or your motherboard

Eh, you clearly don't know anything about OCing video cards so should refrain from giving advice on the subject.
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March 23, 2010 9:32:08 PM

jyjjy said:
Eh, you clearly don't know anything about OCing video cards so should refrain from giving advice on the subject.

Actually, his advice is sound. He just may not be aware that the 5850/5870 actually have more OC headroom than AMD/ATI has defined for those cards within their BIOS and driver packages. They are two of the few exceptions to that rule.
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March 23, 2010 9:44:34 PM

No, it's not sound. The overclocking limits in CCC are well below the speeds cards can stablely achieve. Also overclocking in general is very safe these days, and almost entirely so if you don't change the voltage. In fact you could purposely set out to ruin a card/motherboard with OCing and you'll find it impossible as long as the hardware isn't faulty to begin with. People only think otherwise because of posts like his.
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March 23, 2010 10:33:42 PM

As for what he said, the first part of it was sound, cautious advice. To paraphrase, he said, "Just cause ya can doesn't mean ya should," and that the OP was putting his hardware at risk by trying to take it outside the pre-defined boundary. There really was nothing wrong with that statement. Though, it was already clear that the OP was intent on doing so regardless of the risk, and that he may not be aware that some cards are very capable of doing so. :) 

Now, about what you said, jyjjy... The overclocking limits within CCC are not always well below the speeds that GPUs are capable of in all situations. While some cards generally do have more headroom than the defined parameters, others, even others of the exact same model or within the same family, do not. In the case of those that do have more headroom, that headroom is often only found on cards with an aggressively tuned, non-reference BIOS, or through modifications to the original BIOS' parameters. Those modifications, or tuning, usually involve voltage step-ups with much more precise clock and power curves. So no, the parameters CCC defines for a card are not always well below the speeds they can achieve. Some cards can't even max out within their pre-defined parameters due to limitations within their BIOS.

I downloaded several different BIOS packages from TechpowerUp for HD4890's, then loaded them into RBE to compare them. I found subtle differences in the BIOS of cards that have higher-than-reference factory OC settings than those which are set to run at reference speeds. The one setting that seemed to always change, though the change was sometimes only minor, was the voltage. But that doesn't mean that every RV790 chip within every 4890 card is capable of running at that voltage, or capable of the same OC clocks and stability. Download some and compare them for yourself. I found it interesting.

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March 24, 2010 6:10:02 AM

In general there are relatively few cards which allow you to modify the voltage and without doing so OCing is almost entirely safe. Furthermore his statement came after the OP specifically said the voltage would be left unchanged. Even if he was upping the voltage it is not something to be afraid of as long as you do a modest amount of research to find out what voltages and temperatures are safe and have a basic level of common sense.
I stand by what I said, urging caution in situations were it is unnecessary is either based in paranoia or ignorance and either way it is misinformation. People should be encouraged to get the most out of their technology within boundaries that are reasonably safe rather than being afraid because of naysayers who don't really understand the subject.
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June 23, 2013 8:47:20 AM

Derbixrace said:
http://www.overclock.net/ati/641299-guide-enabling-unof...

after you do that you can overclock with just afterburner.
just check the "apply overclock at startup" box


hmm, couldn't get this to work, note I am using the very latest beta. I can't modify the voltage, and I can't set the clock higher than 700. I did check the check marks for voltage in msi, if you would like, I can post the entire cfg file.
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