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Can I upgrade the CPU in my laptop?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 10:41:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi, I have an almost-3-year-old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with a
Pentium 3 800MHz processor. I want to upgrade to a Penitum 4 2GHz
processor... can I do this? I really need to know soon, because I
found a used processor on eBay that I'm looking to bid on. Thanks in
advance if anyone can help me.

~Erica

More about : upgrade cpu laptop

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 2:32:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You can go to one gig, assuming you have the 100 Mhz FSB/memory in that
machine, and that the BIOS will support it, if the FSB is 133, you could go
to a P3 1.2 gig
That's IT
"Carolyn Dempsey Design" <clyndesign@aol.com> wrote in message
news:e72ab1cd.0409160541.389e6dc2@posting.google.com...
> Hi, I have an almost-3-year-old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with a
> Pentium 3 800MHz processor. I want to upgrade to a Penitum 4 2GHz
> processor... can I do this? I really need to know soon, because I
> found a used processor on eBay that I'm looking to bid on. Thanks in
> advance if anyone can help me.
>
> ~Erica
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 3:00:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

clyndesign@aol.com (Carolyn Dempsey Design) wrote:
>Hi, I have an almost-3-year-old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with a
>Pentium 3 800MHz processor. I want to upgrade to a Penitum 4 2GHz

Laptop CPUs are usually not upgradable (never heard of any that are,
though anything's possible). In general, you can't upgrade from a P3
to a P4 anyway.
Related resources
September 16, 2004 6:13:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

clyndesign@aol.com (Carolyn Dempsey Design) wrote in comp.sys.laptops:

> Hi, I have an almost-3-year-old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with a
> Pentium 3 800MHz processor. I want to upgrade to a Penitum 4 2GHz
> processor... can I do this? I really need to know soon, because I
> found a used processor on eBay that I'm looking to bid on. Thanks in
> advance if anyone can help me.


A laptop mobo and processor socket is something else than a desktop mobo
socket in terms of assembly.
Furthermore I would be surprised if the P4 socket would fit into a PIII
socket, not to mention a possible BIOS incompatibility.


--
CeeBee



Archer: "Houdini could get out of this."
T'Pol: "Perhaps you should invite him on your next mission."


Picard: "Mr. Worf, do you know Gilbert and Sullivan?"
Worf: "No sir, I have not had a chance to meet all the new crew members
since I have been back."
September 16, 2004 7:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Carolyn Dempsey Design <clyndesign@aol.com> wrote:
: Hi, I have an almost-3-year-old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with a
: Pentium 3 800MHz processor. I want to upgrade to a Penitum 4 2GHz
: processor... can I do this? I really need to know soon, because I
: found a used processor on eBay that I'm looking to bid on. Thanks in
: advance if anyone can help me.

Sorry, no can do. The Pentium 3 and Pentium 4 are completely
incompatible hardware-wise. They have different chipsets and socket
arrangements. It would be like trying to play a DVD in your CD
player, except the P3 won't even fit in the P4 socket.

You could upgrade to a P3 1GHZ perhaps but it may not be worth the
effort. Does your machine have the maximum RAM it can handle?

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 12:16:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> Sorry, no can do. The Pentium 3 and Pentium 4 are completely
> incompatible hardware-wise. They have different chipsets and socket
> arrangements. It would be like trying to play a DVD in your CD
> player, except the P3 won't even fit in the P4 socket.
>
> You could upgrade to a P3 1GHZ perhaps but it may not be worth the
> effort. Does your machine have the maximum RAM it can handle?
>
> Andrew

-----------------
Okay, I didn't know that. But I do know that I don't have the maximum
amount of RAM in my laptop. I think I can go up to 500mb, and right
now I only have 256mb. How does that help?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 1:13:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

William P.N. Smith wrote:

> Laptop CPUs are usually not upgradable (never heard of any that are,
> though anything's possible).

Well, I upgraded lots of notebooks with faster CPUs. Mostly not really a
problem...

> In general, you can't upgrade from a P3
> to a P4 anyway.

That's correct.

Benjamin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 4:07:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On or about 9/16/2004 11:16 PM, it came to pass that Carolyn Dempsey Design wrote:
> Okay, I didn't know that. But I do know that I don't have the maximum
> amount of RAM in my laptop. I think I can go up to 500mb, and right
> now I only have 256mb. How does that help?
If your laptop has a 4200rpm hard drive consider replacing it with a 7200 or
5400 rpm drive with an 8 or 16meg buffer. The performance improvement can be
significant.
Arn
September 17, 2004 7:35:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Carolyn Dempsey Design <clyndesign@aol.com> wrote:
: Okay, I didn't know that. But I do know that I don't have the maximum
: amount of RAM in my laptop. I think I can go up to 500mb, and right
: now I only have 256mb. How does that help?

Programs running in Windows consume memory. Windows itself takes up
some minimum amount of memory to do anything (as I type this on my
Windows XP laptop, Windows is using 150MB of RAM all by itself). If
your laptop uses shared Video RAM (many low-end laptops do), even more
of your RAM gets used up for video. If you start opening programs
like MS Office (Word, Excel, etc.) at the same time you are running
Outlook and surfing the web, it is easy to run out of memory. If you
edit a photograph or a document, the program may store a copy of the
"undo" at each stage in memory, so you could run out of memory quickly
if you start editing a large picture, for example.

Windows won't just die if you run out of memory - it will "swap out"
what it thinks are the least important/recently used programs or
documents to your hard disk to "virtual memory". This process of
swapping is not bad but it can really slow you down as you are trying
to do stuff. Laptop hard drives tend to be slow so swapping can be
slow. You'll hear the swapping if your computer kind of slows down
when you try to do something and you hear the hard drive clicking a
lot.

Getting more memory for your computer allows you to open more programs
and/or more documents before Windows runs out of memory and has to
swap. If your computer doesn't have to swap very often, it will be
more responsive and run things faster.

Does that make sense?

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************
!