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Monitor not displaying

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June 25, 2010 5:32:19 PM

Just got a new processor, Q8300 quad core 2.5 ghz.. Just put it in, applied thermal compound, did everything, turned it on, and no display on my monitor.. I took out my graphics card, and tried using my MOBO's display, and nothing, i also tried a different monitor, and nothing... and tried different cables, but still nothing... Am I missing something here? My cpu socket is LGA775 and so is my motherboard (P5PE-VM) Do i have enough power? I've got a 335W power supply, and ATI Radeon 4670 AGP graphics card... Thanks guys.

Also I will probably put my old processor in, and see if it works...

Edit: Boots up, and displays with my previous 2.66 ghz dual core... Was the processor i bought dead? Or maybe i don't have enough power?...

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June 25, 2010 6:38:00 PM

The Q8300 is a 95w processor
http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?spec=SLB5W

The Radeon takes ~60w
http://www.anandtech.com/show/2616

What brand is your PSU?

What other loads do you have on your system (multiple Hard Drives, Disk Drives etc.)

Depending on the PSU brand, it may or may not actually deliver 335w constantly. Most generic PSU makers will give the peak wattage, rather than a reliable figure. Your '335w' PSU may only give 250w reliably.

Was this originally a prebuilt system, or a custom build? Prebuilt systems tend to use cheap PSUs that don't leave much room for upgrades.

If you have another system to test the new processor in, that would be a good idea too.
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June 25, 2010 6:38:46 PM

Did you try resetting the bios and giving it a minute before shutting it off? Power supply isn't the issue.

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June 25, 2010 6:42:04 PM

BTW, just assuming it wasn't the power supply because you said you removed the graphics card and tried with onboard video, relieving the power supply the extra watts.
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June 25, 2010 6:45:51 PM

I believe that this is the same as my power supply. http://www.a-power.com/product-12618 How do i reset the bios? Do i take the battery out for 30 sec, then back in? Ill try that. I could possible test the cpu in a different system. Thanks so much for the replies.
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June 25, 2010 6:46:43 PM

Blckhaze said:
BTW, just assuming it wasn't the power supply because you said you removed the graphics card and tried with onboard video, relieving the power supply the extra watts.


That's EXACTLY what I thought too.

EDIT: After looking for the brand, I found that its actually 350W
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June 25, 2010 6:46:57 PM

Blckhaze said:
BTW, just assuming it wasn't the power supply because you said you removed the graphics card and tried with onboard video, relieving the power supply the extra watts.


That makes sense. I'd still check the PSU, especially if it is a generic one. If it is reliable, there shouldn't be any issues even with the new CPU.
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June 25, 2010 6:54:09 PM

Manual here, shows how you can reset that board... it's a jumper, and I would recommend you reading the manual anyways just to be familiar with your board. You can pop out the battery also, just unplug the PSU before you do anything.
http://dlsvr03.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/socket775/P5PE-VM/e...

page 1.9 should be what you're looking for though, but there's also sections on installing a CPU,etc
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June 25, 2010 6:54:38 PM

Arigo said:
I believe that this is the same as my power supply. http://www.a-power.com/product-12618 How do i reset the bios? Do i take the battery out for 30 sec, then back in? Ill try that. I could possible test the cpu in a different system. Thanks so much for the replies.


There should be a jumper on your motherboard that says "CLR_CMOS" or something like that. If you can't find it, remove the battery for maybe a minute or two, then reinsert.

I have never heard of that brand of PSU, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's generic. If you decide to upgrade, brands like Corsair or Thermaltake are usually quite reliable.
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June 25, 2010 6:59:47 PM

Yeah it would be a good idea to upgrade that PSU for futureproof!
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June 25, 2010 7:08:20 PM

Couldn't find CLR_CMOS, but took out battery for like 5 mins (prior to you guys posting that) and put it back in, booted up and nothing happened. Any other ideas, or is it dead?
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June 25, 2010 7:10:20 PM

Look at page 21 on the manual

Also, when you are turning the PC on, are you giving it a couple of minutes? Otherwise this seems to be a problem with the processor or compatibility..

Manual says Dual core, not Quad core
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June 25, 2010 7:24:46 PM

In the manual it says how to enable hyper-threading.. Does that have anything to do with quad core? The socket type is LGA775.. Shouldn't it work?? (cpu is LGA775 aswell)
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June 25, 2010 7:34:35 PM

Even though it is the same socket, does not mean it can support every LGA775 CPU. You can burn out transisters in the motherboard if you're using a processor that takes more voltage than the motherboard is designed to handle.

Not completely sure though... Should call the manufacturer about this
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June 25, 2010 7:42:38 PM

It appears your motherboard (ASUS P5PE-VM?) does not support the Intel Core 2 Quad series; ergo not booting. You could try looking for a BIOS update and flashing to see if that will resolve the issue. Also try pulling the motherboard, CPU, RAM, and PSU out of your case to ensure the parts aren't grounding on anything, testing each part individually if possible (aka. Boot Test). I would also check the motherboard's CPU socket for any bent/broken pins; a system will not "normally" boot if a single pin is even slightly off. As far as clearing CMOS goes, If you decide to pull out the battery, I would recommend leaving it out for a good 15 minutes to be sure or even replacing the battery. Ultimately though, it seems to be a simple matter of not having support for your CPU; and to answer your question about Intel's Hyper Threading technology. It only applies to P4's, Celeron's, Xeon's, Itanium's, i3's, i5's and i7's.
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a b à CPUs
June 25, 2010 7:43:47 PM

Product Right there it shows your board as:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Core 2 Duo / Pentium D / Celeron D

While if you look up other socket 775 boards,
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
it shows:
Core 2 Quad/Duo / Pentium Dual-Core / Celeron
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June 25, 2010 11:42:01 PM

ahhhhhhhhhhhh :( ... I guess my question now, is : Is there any realllly cheap mother boards that support core 2 quad?
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June 26, 2010 12:30:02 AM

If the ASUS P5PE-VM is indeed your motherboard, I would highly recommend upgrading your memory as well from DDR PC 3200 (400 MHz) to DDR2 PC2 5300 (667 MHz) or faster. DDR is typically more expensive (considering it has been phased out in addition to supply and demand). DDR2 and DDR3 are in the "sweet spot" price versus performance-wise. Possibly the cheapest places you'll find online is going to be Craigslist, Ebay, KSL and Pricewatch. However, your more reputable online vendors will be Directron, Geeks, Newegg, Tigerdirect, and Zipzoomfly.

I personally would look for something along the lines of this if your looking for a decent/cheap motherboard: "http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..."

It's always best to take the time to thoroughly investigate the cost/performance ratio as well as the reliability and upgrade path of the system. It just all depends on what you want to be doing now and eventually. Apart from all of this, any luck in your trouble shooting?
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June 26, 2010 12:39:47 AM

Diabolical User said:
If the ASUS P5PE-VM is indeed your motherboard, I would highly recommend upgrading your memory as well from DDR PC 3200 (400 MHz) to DDR2 PC2 5300 (667 MHz) or faster. DDR is typically more expensive (considering it has been phased out in addition to supply and demand). DDR2 and DDR3 are in the "sweet spot" price versus performance-wise. Possibly the cheapest places you'll find online is going to be Craigslist, Ebay, KSL and Pricewatch. However, your more reputable online vendors will be Directron, Geeks, Newegg, Tigerdirect, and Zipzoomfly.

I personally would look for something along the lines of this if your looking for a decent/cheap motherboard: "http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..."

It's always best to take the time to thoroughly investigate the cost/performance ratio as well as the reliability and upgrade path of the system. It just all depends on what you want to be doing now and eventually. Apart from all of this, any luck in your trouble shooting?


After figuring out that my MOBO dosen't support core 2 quad, I figured I need a knew MOBO, but before I took out the battery for a good 5 mins, and nothing.. tried different monitors and things like that. And the motherboard you posted dosen't have an AGP slot.. my video card is AGP

Edit: The only motherboard on the WHOLE site.. that has AGP and core 2 quad..

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

What do you guys think of that? Or is there anything else that you can find that has an AGP slot, and core 2 quad.. And i've never heard of "ASROCK" are they any good? Thanks so much guys!
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June 26, 2010 1:53:45 AM

That looks fine to me, but several reviews say the board was DOA. One advantage that I see with that one is that you can reuse at least some of your current RAM, and upgrade if you wish to at a later date.

At this point, I might be tempted to return the new CPU, and build a completely new system, if your budget allows. It would definitely be faster, more reliable and several components would be much easier to upgrade in the future.
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June 26, 2010 2:05:37 AM

user 18 said:
That looks fine to me, but several reviews say the board was DOA. One advantage that I see with that one is that you can reuse at least some of your current RAM, and upgrade if you wish to at a later date.

At this point, I might be tempted to return the new CPU, and build a completely new system, if your budget allows. It would definitely be faster, more reliable and several components would be much easier to upgrade in the future.


Thanks for the reply, and input. But I don't have the budget to build a new computer. I think I will try that motherboard, and if it arrives DOA, I'll try to replace it, and hopefully get a working one. Unless anybody has a different possible motherboard, or ideas. Thanks again!
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June 26, 2010 2:10:46 AM

Great, good luck with your new motherboard. Glad to help.
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June 26, 2010 2:25:50 AM

Atleast you identified the problem without having to return the CPU or buy a new power supply... saved some money there :) 
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June 26, 2010 3:08:54 PM

Best answer selected by Arigo.
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