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Which program should I trust

Last response: in CPUs
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June 26, 2010 9:36:09 PM

Hello
I have an i5 750 at stock speed and these are the temperatures reported by some programs. Which one should i trust as being accurate?


CoreTemp and speedfan are close and CPUID never even went so low as to show me 20C temperatures.
Thanks

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a c 113 à CPUs
June 26, 2010 9:50:49 PM

What's the ambient temperature and what cooler? Even when idle, the core temps should be several degrees above ambient. You should look at the temps when all cores are 100% busy.
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June 26, 2010 10:09:48 PM

I guess ~20C ish (don't have a thermometer nearby). No, it's a Noctua NH-U9B.
In full load: (linx tested ~15 minutes)
The motherboard's own software always gave some annoying error on windows 7 x64 so i uninstalled it, something regarding failure to load driver or similar (it's a gigabyte mainboard)
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a c 113 à CPUs
June 26, 2010 10:17:00 PM

As you can see, they are much closer. None can be 100% accurate until all cores reach TJ. Max (TCC). Most applications assume the TJ. Max temperature and therefore are not very accurate.
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June 26, 2010 10:21:51 PM

Yes. I can see, i guess speed fan is ok then. Thanks
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June 26, 2010 10:23:58 PM

Best answer selected by creat0r79.
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June 27, 2010 10:13:36 PM

use Everest
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a c 113 à CPUs
June 28, 2010 1:10:21 AM

Even Everest can't be 100% accurate.
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a c 81 à CPUs
June 28, 2010 1:37:28 AM

That way no software program will be accurate as they fetch all the relevant info from the other monitoring programs such as motherboard bios readings etc.. May be a hardware solution will give better accurate results such as a front bay fan controller and temperature monitoring system.. The thermocoupled wires take the relevant information from the attached surface and so depending on the placement the results can be most nearest to accurate.. It wont give the voltage info though..
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a c 113 à CPUs
June 28, 2010 1:52:05 AM

As long as software can report temperatures within a few degrees, that's fine. The closer a core is to the TJ. Max., the more accurate the temperature reading is (as long as the software is based on the correct TJ. Max. value, etc.) The primary goal is to protect the CPU, not to provide very accurate temperature readings. The CPU will shutdown way before it gets damaged. I know because a fan failed on one of my systems and it shutdown a few times before I realized that the fan wasn't spinning at all.
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