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Is my e6400 CPU done for?

Last response: in Systems
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April 21, 2010 4:44:27 AM

Hey,

So, my computer was working fine. Then I decided to install a new heatsink.
I 'broke' my old one while re-applying thermal paste a while back, so I had to sit my heartsink on top and lay my computer sideways... I'm dumb, I know.

Regardless, things were working fine. Then, after installing my new heatsink - my computer didn't boot.

I've gone through the standard checklist and troubleshooting thread, useful stuff. I'm finally at the point where I have taken everything out of the case.
What I have is:
- the motherboard with CPU and heatsink fan (I removed the heatsink itself)
- the power supply
- no RAM stuck in
- connected the power source/speakers from my case to the motherboard
- resetted the CMOS, since I did OC my CPU


I turn the power supply switch on, the motherboard light goes up.
I turn the power switch, the CPU fan starts up, and I can hear the power supply going fine.
After 15-30 seconds, everything goes off. No beeps.

The likely cause?
Looking at the CPU socket, it looks like there's some junk in there (I may have clumsily allowed some dust to sneak in and mix with the paste). I've tried cleaning it with a small bit of alcohol but it's no use.

Is it the CPU that's done for? Is there anything else I can do to test and make 100% sure it's the CPU and my stupidity?

My specs:

PS: Corsair HX750
CPU: e6400
MB: ASUS p5b


Thanks!!

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April 21, 2010 6:51:50 AM

Clean it some more, you'd need the cpu and hs surface to be as clean as possible. It may not come off with alcohol and cotton buds on the 1st try, but it would eventually come off with repetitive rubbing, more alcohol and cotton buds.

The way cpu's are made today, you probably haven't killed it (except for static electricity though). Modern cpu's would shut off after a certain high temperature is reached.

You should try reapplying the paste and hsf.
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April 21, 2010 7:11:42 AM

There's a couple things in your post that are sending up huge red flags. I hope I'm just reading your post wrong.
mmilo said:
- the motherboard with CPU and heatsink fan (I removed the heatsink itself)

So are you saying you don't have a heatsink installed on the CPU, you just have a fan blowing on it? I hope that's not what you're saying.

mmilo said:
Looking at the CPU socket, it looks like there's some junk in there (I may have clumsily allowed some dust to sneak in and mix with the paste). I've tried cleaning it with a small bit of alcohol but it's no use.

This sounds like for some reason you put thermal paste in the CPU socket instead of on top of the CPU between the CPU and heatsink. Again, I hope I'm reading this wrong because the thermal paste shouldn't go anywhere near the CPU socket.
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a b à CPUs
April 21, 2010 7:54:20 AM

shortstuff_mt said:
This sounds like for some reason you put thermal paste in the CPU socket instead of on top of the CPU between the CPU and heatsink. Again, I hope I'm reading this wrong because the thermal paste shouldn't go anywhere near the CPU socket.


That's the way I read it.

OP -- If that's the case, the CPU isn't done for, but the motherboard probably is. Dust and encrusted crap in the socket is just plain not going to work. To test this theory, try the CPU (MAKE SURE THE PINS ARE CLEAN FIRST) in another system with a 775 motherboard and see if the thing will turn on.
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April 21, 2010 12:40:38 PM

capt_taco said:
That's the way I read it.

Me too.

To test this theory, try the CPU ([b said:
MAKE SURE THE PINS ARE CLEAN FIRST) in another system with a 775 motherboard and see if the thing will turn on.]To test this theory, try the CPU (MAKE SURE THE PINS ARE CLEAN FIRST) in another system with a 775 motherboard and see if the thing will turn on.
[/b]
That's easy. LGA CPU's do not really have pins.

If there's crud on the bottom of the CPU, place it upside down on a piece of anti-static material, spray it liberally with isoproyl alcohol, and wipe off. Repeat until it is clean.

The motherboard socket is much more difficult.
April 21, 2010 3:41:22 PM

Thanks for the replies!

shortstuff_mt said:

So are you saying you don't have a heatsink installed on the CPU, you just have a fan blowing on it? I hope that's not what you're saying.


Unfortunately no. I've put my HS back on since, but I took it off initially to get everything barebones and to see if I could get a POST.


This sounds like for some reason you put thermal paste in the CPU socket instead of on top of the CPU between the CPU and heatsink. Again, I hope I'm reading this wrong because the thermal paste shouldn't go anywhere near the CPU socket. said:

This sounds like for some reason you put thermal paste in the CPU socket instead of on top of the CPU between the CPU and heatsink. Again, I hope I'm reading this wrong because the thermal paste shouldn't go anywhere near the CPU socket.


This I'm not 100% sure about, but thats what it *looks* like. This of course wasn't intentional.


I'm going to keep cleaning and hope things work out, otherwise it's time to break out the cash. Bah.

April 21, 2010 3:45:20 PM

Is there a way I can tell whether it's my either of my CPU/MB that's done for, other than swapping them out and testing with other hardware?

I figure since my HSF starts spinning (and case fans, if I plug them in), my MB would be working.

Thanks!
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April 21, 2010 3:48:25 PM

Well, if your CPU wasn't damaged before it may be now. Powering a CPU up without a heatsink installed is a VERY bad idea. It only takes a matter of a couple seconds for a CPU to heat up to dangerous levels without a heatsink installed. No amount of air blowing on it is going to keep it cool without a heatsink installed. At least current chips are supposed to shut down before they cook themselves.
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