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Native Resolution & Synchronizing

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 28, 2010 1:41:43 AM

i am about to build a new rig and buy a new monitor, upgrading from a CRT monitor. i understand that 120hz monitor will display 1 frame for 8.333ms and response time will check for frame updates as often response time is stated. i know that is just displayed portion and video card is signal transmitted to the monitor.

but my question is what is native resolution is it a FIX resolution or is it all the resolution with that ratio? people say native resolution is max resolution of the monitor, while others say it is OS desktop resolution. also how do i make use of the monitor information like response time, hz & native resolution.

but not all games support video cards at max resolution & settings. so how do i setup optimum settings with out bottle necking the video card, while synchronizing with the video card & monitor?
March 30, 2010 12:30:14 AM

can anyone help me with this?
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a b C Monitor
March 30, 2010 12:38:25 AM

Native Resolution states the number of pixels or "dots" in your monitor. If it says 1440x900, it means it has 1440 dots lined up from left to right and 900 dots lined up from top to bottom for a total of 1,296,000 dots.

You can set in Windows the resolution to send to your monitor under "Display Properties". Right click on your Windows "Desktop" and go to "Settings" to see it.
In an LCD monitor, you can not set higher resolution than your monitor native resolution in the Display Settings but you can set it lower.

Let us know of what you got in your PC:
CPU
Video Card
Power SUpply
Motherboard
so we can tell you what resolution you need to get to make the most of your system without bottlenecking it.
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Best solution

a c 358 U Graphics card
a c 195 C Monitor
March 30, 2010 1:17:03 AM

The best resolution to use for any LCD is it's native (or max) resolution which is stated in the monitor's specs. You can always use lower than native resolution like 1680 x 1050 on a 1920 x 1200 or 1920 x 1080 resolution monitor. However, it will not look as sharp as native resolution, then have it stretched to fit the entire screen. FYI, games on Xbox 360 and PS3 are rendered at 1280 x 720 (720p) resolution, then stretched to fit a 1920 x 1080 HDTV.

The greater the difference between the resolution you want to use and the native resolution, the more fuzzy images and text will look. The best "less than max resolution" is whatever the native resolution is divided by 2.

Another FYI, 120Hz HDTVs and 120Hz PC monitors operates differently. 120Hz HDTVs creates and inserts artificial frames to improve smoothness and "visual quality" (giving that "live" look). This increases input lag which is the time it takes for your control reaction to be displayed on the screen.

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April 6, 2010 6:07:18 AM

jaguarskx said:
The greater the difference between the resolution you want to use and the native resolution, the more fuzzy images and text will look. The best "less than max resolution" is whatever the native resolution is divided by 2.


so what is optimal performance for a monitor running at max resolution? i want to run at 1920x1080 (1080p) resolution but reading up on native resolution i see things about adding frames, resizing, stretching, etc... to avoid all this what is the best to way o keep FPS maxed out. because people tell me running native resolution will boost FPS while gaming.

jaguarskx said:
Another FYI, 120Hz HDTVs and 120Hz PC monitors operates differently. 120Hz HDTVs creates and inserts artificial frames to improve smoothness and "visual quality" (giving that "live" look). This increases input lag which is the time it takes for your control reaction to be displayed on the screen.


is there a big difference between running a PC on a LCD TV vs LCD monitor? i notice LCD TVs have higher hz then monitors but i always think monitors are better for PCs. for FPS game people say 120hz is better, while for MMOs people say response time is better.

i know for displaying purpose 120hz = 1 frame displayed for 8.3333ms and response time (RT) checks how often if the frame needs to update. so that i know of a balance of both is needed. 2ms RT will update the next frame for 120hz at 10ms (1.666ms difference or ghosting) ideally 2.1ms will update the next frame at 8.4ms for 120hz (0.066ms difference or ghosting) but 2.1 response time is very rare to find. so 3ms response time will update the frame at 9ms (0.666 difference for ghosting) which is more reasonable. but i was told even if you run at 120hz if the FPS isnt 120+ then you will see tearing. how would you prevent this from happening.
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a c 358 U Graphics card
a c 195 C Monitor
April 6, 2010 7:41:18 AM

shinigami304 said:
so what is optimal performance for a monitor running at max resolution? i want to run at 1920x1080 (1080p) resolution but reading up on native resolution i see things about adding frames, resizing, stretching, etc... to avoid all this what is the best to way o keep FPS maxed out. because people tell me running native resolution will boost FPS while gaming.


Optimal performance depends on the video card and how much you want to spend on it. Generally speaking people usually recommend a HD 5850 for 1920x1080 or 1920x1200. The more pixels there are the more powerful the card you need. Resizing, stretching only applies if you are using less than native resolution and you want to fill the entire screen. The Xbox 360 and PS3 does this with games on a 1080p HDTV 'cause those games are really 720p.


shinigami304 said:
is there a big difference between running a PC on a LCD TV vs LCD monitor? i notice LCD TVs have higher hz then monitors but i always think monitors are better for PCs. for FPS game people say 120hz is better, while for MMOs people say response time is better.

i know for displaying purpose 120hz = 1 frame displayed for 8.3333ms and response time (RT) checks how often if the frame needs to update. so that i know of a balance of both is needed. 2ms RT will update the next frame for 120hz at 10ms (1.666ms difference or ghosting) i deal 2.1ms will update the next frame at 8.4ms for 120hz (0.166ms difference or ghosting) but 2.1 response time is very rare to find. so 3ms response time will update the frame at 9ms (0.666 difference for ghosting) which is more reasonable. but i was told even if you run at 120hz if the FPS isnt 120+ then you will see tearing. how would you prevent this from happening.


As I stated, 120Hz on HDTV and PC monitors work differently. For a 120Hz or 240Hz HDTV you will want to set the refresh rate to 60Hz otherwise the TV's internal electronics will perform some video enhancement. Thus you get additional input lag.
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April 18, 2010 5:46:18 PM

Best answer selected by shinigami304.
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May 30, 2010 10:17:23 AM

I have a 24" iMac with a Radeon HD 4850. The native resolution is 1920x1200@60hz. When running windows and going into the display control panel and listing all modes I see the 1920x1200 is only available at 60hz but I can select 1920x1080@120hz. It doesn't appear fuzzier than the native resolution, in fact it seems to look better. My mouse also seems to move more fluidly.

1920x1080 can be selected at 60hz,65hz,70hz,85hz and 120hz. I would like to be able to play Borderlands in 1920x1080@120hz, but there appears to be no way to select the refresh rate from within the game. When I set the game resolution to 1920x1080 it appears to be in 60hz mode. Can anyone offer advice?
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